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Last 5 Posts:
· Lassen NP and Burney Falls: Hits and Misses (Jun 26, 2017)
· Franklins gull colony (Jun 22, 2017)
· Re: [CALBIRDS] Grackle or Blackbird? (Jun 22, 2017)
· Re: [CALBIRDS] Continuing Long-tailed Jaeger, Bridgeport Reservoir, Mono Co. 6/19 (Jun 20, 2017)
· Continuing Long-tailed Jaeger, Bridgeport Reservoir, and other Mono Co. rarities (Jun 20, 2017)
  1. Lassen NP and Burney Falls: Hits and Misses LINK
    DATE: Jun 26, 2017 @ 8:27pm, 2 day(s) ago
    Last week we headed up to the mountains after scoring one of the camping cabins along Manzanita lake. Here are a few lake highlights: a supposedly rare in the area white breasted nuthatch, behaving like an inexperienced bird, and dwarved by the giant ponderosa pine cone on which it was perched and pecking, a young Mountain chickadee popping in and out of its nest hole in a horizontal stump on the ground. To fledge or not to fledge: that was the question. A beautiful male Yellow Warbler in a willow thicket along the lake. Many willow flycatchers making their explosive "fitz-beeeew!" calls in the tree tops. White headed woodpeckers in our campsite, and many Hairy woodpeckers and both hairy and pileated holes in many trees, and a red breasted sapsucker, and best of show, bits of bark flying in the wind which led me to look up and see the jet black back of a black backed woodpecker.
    Dusk on the lake brought out ten common nighthawks, peenting against the fading light of the mountain sky, and a fly by by an osprey. The osprey's favorite former perch, a tall bleached white snag near the boat launch, was down and floating near shore, and we saw neither osprey not eagles hunting Manzanitalake this time.
    At Burney Falls we were treated to the sight of the resident nesting black swifts, watching them flit overhead and hearing their distinctive chitter once we were away from the thunder of the falls. Above the falls, we watched a dipper forage for many long minutes, riding the rapids with head immersed, popping up with microseconds to spare to jump onto a rock in its path, and then diving underneath to walk along the bottom, foraging for bugs. This was right at the lip of these dramatically high falls, and the current was swift! It swam across the stream and worked the reeds by the opposite bank, too. Never noticed us, agog on the opposite shore.
    Big water everywhere, and wildflowers, too.
    Debbie Viess
  2. -back to top-
  3. Franklins gull colony LINK
    DATE: Jun 22, 2017 @ 7:50pm, 6 day(s) ago
    I just counted 71 Franklin's Gulls on the se corner of Meiss Lake in the Butte Valley Wildlife Area in Siskiyou County. I didn't see any nests but I suspect that this is a breeding colony at this time of the year unless they are visiting from a colony in the Klamath basin.
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    John Sterling
    
    530 908-3836
    
    26 Palm Ave
    
    Woodland, CA 95695
  4. -back to top-
  5. Re: [CALBIRDS] Grackle or Blackbird? LINK
    DATE: Jun 22, 2017 @ 1:42pm, 6 day(s) ago
    At 11:01 AM 6/18/2017, kris wood sfbaybreezes@... [CALBIRDS] wrote:
    >Do Brewer's Blackbirds sometimes appear solid black without any
    
    >green iridescence
    
    They absolutely do. As previously mentioned, gloss on nearly any
    
    species bird becomes difficult or impossible when the sun isn't
    
    shining on the bird.
    > That could explain it. Or are there any other blackbirds that
    
    > would look like that
    
    It's easy to confuse Brewer's & Rusty and Red-winged & Tri-colored
    
    Blackbirds and I've seen very experienced birders (including myself)
    
    get them confused. They don't always display their various
    
    distinguishing characteristics. Examination with a good field guide
    
    close at hand is essential.
    
    Chuck Almdale
  6. -back to top-
  7. Re: [CALBIRDS] Continuing Long-tailed Jaeger, Bridgeport Reservoir, Mono Co. 6/19 LINK
    DATE: Jun 20, 2017 @ 3:33pm, 8 day(s) ago
    I was with Peter Metropolis when the bird was found.We were extremely lucky that it flew right by us not 20 feet away, after many distant looks.It is a stunning bird in breeding plumage! One person got a not so great photos with a not so great camera but proof of the bird and the condition.
    
    On Jun 19, 2017, at 11:56 AM, Frances hummer52@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
    Posting for John Luther:
    
    The continuing LONG-TAILED JAEGER was refound today at 1045AM at theBridgeport Reservoir by John Luther. He observed it from the parking area North of the Bridgeport Reservoir RV Park which is along the east side of the reservoir. This area is South of the previously reported location. A scope is needed since the bird tends to be out in the middle of the reservoir. It flew around several times, allowing him to get good looks.
    
    Good Birding! John Luther Oakland, CA
    
    Frances serving as the messenger.
  8. -back to top-
  9. Continuing Long-tailed Jaeger, Bridgeport Reservoir, and other Mono Co. rarities LINK
    DATE: Jun 20, 2017 @ 8:01am, 8 day(s) ago
    Hi All,
    
    I wanted to follow-up on the post below regarding the LONG-TAILED JAEGER and a few other rarities that we saw during the Mono Basin Bird Chautauqua last weekend. The jaeger was originally found at Bridgeport Reservoir by Peter Metropulos on a field trip on Friday, June 16, and he told me it was seen and photographed from the boat launch at the county park about ½-mile west of the dam. Our group was able to relocate it the following day by scanning the reservoir from a turn-out on the north  side of  Highway 182, just east of the air strip (i.e., about 2 miles west of where it was originally seen). It was an adult in breeding plumage, and seen by our entire group.  It was at least 1/2-mile away far out on the reservoir so we didn't try for any ID photos. We also found an adult female COSTA’S HUMMINGBIRD foraging on flowering shrubs at a large rock outcrop, approximately 1 mile east of the dam on Highway 182. Our complete checklist for the day:   http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37697971
    
    Mary Anne Flett told us that she had found a singing male INDIGO BUNTING on Lundy Lake Road, just off Highway 395 last week which we were able to relocate on Saturday and Sunday. It was singing from dead branches in a sagebrush swale, approximately 200 yards up the road from Highway 395, adjacent to a small dirt road on the left (west) side of Lundy Lake Road, labeled with a brown sign “1N13” and was moving back and forth with a male Lazuli Bunting.  The exact location is shown on this checklist:   http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37698126
    
    When we returned to Lee Vining we were told about a singing male CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER  that was found that morning at the Reversed Creek Campground, at campsite 17 on the June Lake loop. Keith, John Harris, and I went out there and met up with Karen Amstutz and  Sarah Stock and searched this area together for about 1/2 –hour before we found the bird. It was originally along the creek below the campsite (which is closed due to flooding and blocked by yellow tape), but later flew around the campsite and gave us good looks and photo ops:   http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37698335
    
    I also heard about a male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK  at the first beaver pond just up the trail from Lundy Lake Lodge, and know that a bunch of birders saw it, but I did not chase this bird. I also heard from John Harris that he had seen a previously reported LEAST FLYCATCHER on a small, dirt access road just south of Topaz Lake, off Highway 395, on Friday, but I was unable to relocate this bird, possibly because I was looking in the wrong place.
    
    Overall, a good weekend for rarities in Mono County!
    
    Ted Beedy Nevada County
    
    P.S. I apologize for cross-postings, but wanted to get the word out in case folks want to find any of these birds.
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Frances hummer52@... [CALBIRDS]
    Sent: Monday, June 19, 2017 11:57 AM
    To: easternsierrabirds list; County Birders; CALBIRDS
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] Continuing Long-tailed Jaeger, Bridgeport Reservoir, Mono Co. 6/19
    
    
    
    Posting for John Luther:
    
    The continuing LONG-TAILED JAEGER was refound today at 1045AM at theBridgeport Reservoir by John Luther. He observed it from the parking area North of the Bridgeport Reservoir RV Park which is along the east side of the reservoir. This area is South of the previously reported location. A scope is needed since the bird tends to be out in the middle of the reservoir. It flew around several times, allowing him to get good looks.
    
    Good Birding! John Luther Oakland, CA
    
    Frances serving as the messenger.
  10. -back to top-
  11. Continuing Long-tailed Jaeger, Bridgeport Reservoir, Mono Co. 6/19 LINK
    DATE: Jun 19, 2017 @ 11:56am, 9 day(s) ago
    Posting for John Luther:
    
    The continuing LONG-TAILED JAEGER was refound today at 1045AM at the  Bridgeport Reservoir by John Luther. He observed it from the parking area North of the Bridgeport Reservoir RV Park which is along the east side of the reservoir. This area is South of the previously reported location. A scope is needed since the bird tends to be out in the middle of the reservoir. It flew around several times, allowing him to get good looks.
    
    Good Birding! John Luther Oakland, CA
    
    Frances serving as the messenger.
  12. -back to top-
  13. Re: [CALBIRDS] Grackle or Blackbird? LINK
    DATE: Jun 18, 2017 @ 3:26pm, 10 day(s) ago
    Hi Kris,
    
    Right now I’ve got families of Brewer’s Blackbirds coming in for suet and
    seed to my yard. Females and the kids are all black or black-dark brown
    mixes. Have you considered them Totally agree with others to
    getting an updated field guide- Sibley is good!
    
    Denise Hamilton
    Napa
    
    From: sfbaybreezes@... [CALBIRDS]
    Sent: Sunday, June 18, 2017 7:24 AM
    To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] Grackle or Blackbird
    
    
    
     Hi !
    
    I am totally new to
    this forum, but am enthusiastic about learning about birds, so I am hoping that
    some of you may help me.
    
    I am not coming into
    this without having done some homework.
    
    I am a biologist and
    have worked many years in this field.
    
    However, ornithology is
    new to me.
    
    I have studied the National Audubon Society Field
    Guide to North American Birds (ASFG) for the past few months, in hopes of
    learning the birds in my locale.
    
    I do have a popular
    bird feeder, which I love.
    
    But I also see other birds in the
    neighborhood and sometimes have questions.
    
    That TOO longintroduction being said, I have been seeing a black bird, that is much like a
    Brewer's blackbird in size, but it is ALL black, no iridescent green or any
    other colors.
    
     Do any of you know what
    kind of bird this could be It kind of looks like a
    grackle from the ASFG, though they are not supposed to be in this area per the
    maps.
    
    But these may be out of date.
    
    I did
    search for grackles and it seems they may be local.
    
    I would welcome any and
    all shares.
    
    Thanks very much.
    
    kris wood
    richmond,
    ca
  14. -back to top-
  15. Re: [CALBIRDS] Grackle or Blackbird? LINK
    DATE: Jun 18, 2017 @ 11:01am, 10 day(s) ago
    Thanks for the great responses, folks! So it definitely is not a grackle.
    
    Do Brewer's Blackbirds sometimes appear solid black without any green iridescence That could explain it. Or are there any other blackbirds that would look like that
    
    I will check out the resources you suggested. Thanks very much!
    
    Kris Wood
    
    Richmond, CA
    
    On Sunday, June 18, 2017 8:43 AM, C Snyder wrote:
    
    Hi Kris,
    
    In addition to acquiring one of David Sibley's most recent field guides, I'd recommend Cornell's website All About Birds and be sure to study the range map for each species.
    
    Check out classes with Golden Gate Audubon.July should bring a list of fall classes, with registration in August.
    
    If you buy Sibley's Birds of North America, be sure to get the 2nd edition's 2nd printing (because the 1st printing has issues with incorrect color for some plates).
    
    Good birding,
    
    Tate Snyder
    Menlo Park
    
    On Jun 18, 2017, at 10:24 AM, sfbaybreezes@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
  16. -back to top-
  17. Re: [CALBIRDS] Grackle or Blackbird? LINK
    DATE: Jun 18, 2017 @ 7:52am, 11 day(s) ago
    Kris,
    
    Welcome to the group.
    
    I can't tell you what you're seeing, but I can tell you that your field guide is hopelessly out of date and, IMHO, wasn't very good to begin with.  There are excellent, modern books available and you should get (at least) one!
    
    Also, Great-tailed Grackles have expanded their range considerably since your book was published.  I've created a map of recent sightings in your area here:   http://ebird.org/ebird/map/grtgraneg=true&env.minX=-122.57439344091796&env.minY=37.87772424929477&env.maxX=-122.10541455908202&env.maxY=38.02851234285631&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=range&byr=2013&eyr=2017 .  However, this species is way bigger than Brewer's Blackbird.
    
    Perhaps you can get a photo and post it.
    
    Ken Burton
    Klamath
    
    On Sun, Jun 18, 2017 at 7:24 AM, sfbaybreezes@... [CALBIRDS] < CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
      Hi
    !   I
    am totally new to this forum, but am enthusiastic about learning about birds,
    so I am hoping that some of you may help me.   I
    am not coming into this without having done some homework.   I am a biologist and have worked many years
    in this field.   However, ornithology is
    new to me.   I have studied the National
    Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Birds (ASFG) for the past few
    months, in hopes of learning the birds in my locale.   I
    do have a popular bird feeder, which I love.  
    But I also see other birds in the neighborhood and sometimes have
    questions.   That
    TOO long introduction being said, I have been seeing a black bird, that is much
    like a Brewer's blackbird in size, but it is ALL black, no iridescent green or
    any other colors.     Do
    any of you know what kind of bird this could be    It kind of looks like a grackle from the ASFG,
    though they are not supposed to be in this area per the maps.   But these may be out of date.   I did search for grackles and it seems they
    may be local.   I
    would welcome any and all shares.   Thanks
    very much.   kris wood
    richmond, ca
  18. -back to top-
  19. Grackle or Blackbird? LINK
    DATE: Jun 18, 2017 @ 7:24am, 11 day(s) ago
    Hi
    !
    
    I
    am totally new to this forum, but am enthusiastic about learning about birds,
    so I am hoping that some of you may help me.
    
    I
    am not coming into this without having done some homework.
    
    I am a biologist and have worked many years
    in this field.
    
    However, ornithology is
    new to me.
    
    I have studied the National
    Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Birds (ASFG) for the past few
    months, in hopes of learning the birds in my locale.
    
    I
    do have a popular bird feeder, which I love.
    But I also see other birds in the neighborhood and sometimes have
    questions.
    
    That
    TOO long introduction being said, I have been seeing a black bird, that is much
    like a Brewer's blackbird in size, but it is ALL black, no iridescent green or
    any other colors.
    
     Do
    any of you know what kind of bird this could be It kind of looks like a grackle from the ASFG,
    though they are not supposed to be in this area per the maps.
    
    But these may be out of date.
    
    I did search for grackles and it seems they
    may be local.
    
    I
    would welcome any and all shares.
    
    Thanks
    very much.
    
    kris wood
    richmond, ca
  20. -back to top-
  21. Chestnut-sided Warbler- Bodega Bay, 6/13. LINK
    DATE: Jun 13, 2017 @ 1:56pm, 15 day(s) ago
    Hello Birders,
    This morning just after 8 AM I found a singing male CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER in Bodega Bay, Sonoma County.
    It was seenprimarily in the willows just N. of path leading up Owl Canyon. It sang with loudpersistence from 8:08 until about 9:00, and was the first bird Idetectedupon exiting the vehicle, along with E. Collared-Dove.
    I left briefly, returning around9:30. It was heard again between 9:30 - 11:00, but more subdued in volume, much less persistent.
    The weatherwas clear, and mostly windless here overnight. Cool temps with bright sunshine this morning, it heated up early so bird activity dwindled accordingly. Wind was increasing a little by noon.
    Good Birding,
    ~ Dan Nelson, Sonoma County
  22. -back to top-
  23. Blackpoll Warbler - Bodega Bay, Sonoma Co. June 7-8, 2017. LINK
    DATE: Jun 8, 2017 @ 7:02pm, 20 day(s) ago
    Hi Birders,
    Yesterday while birding Owl Canyon on the W. side of Bodega Harbor, my ears twice detected atune I took to be aBLACKPOLL WARBLER song, but despite waiting for 3 hrs. the bird was never seen or heard again for confirmation. With drizzle, rain and SE windarriving overnight, luck was in my favor and the singing adult male BLACKPOLL WARBLER was re-found today, around mid-day as the rain and wind began to let up. It sang mostlythe typical brief "whisper" song,but would occasionally shorten the song further into a5 - 6 note pattern.
    It was audio-recorded, and posed for a few photos in rather dismal light and drizzle. When not singing, the Blackpoll seemed to hang outand follow a small party of 4-5 Chestnut-backed Chickadees and8-10 Bushtits. This party would eventually return to feed inthe Eucalyptus guarding the canyon entrance, where many flowers adorn the treetop.
    
    The only other record for spring Blackpollin Sonoma County was June 4-7, 1991,in the cypresses formerly present in the "old" Bodega Marine Lab parking lot. (Dan Nelson, Wini Nelson, Nancy Conzett)Also a singing male.
    
    Good Birding, great memories...
    
    ~Dan Nelson, Sonoma County
  24. -back to top-
  25. Grace's Warbler in Mariposa County, June 2 LINK
    DATE: Jun 8, 2017 @ 4:27pm, 20 day(s) ago
    Birders,   I just received a report of a Grace’s Warbler photographed in Yosemite National Park (Mariposa County) on June 2. I had not seen it reported elsewhere, so thought it may be of interest, even though a week after the fact. The location was
    reported as the Tunnel View parking lot, and the bird described as “feeding on and near ground in dry ponderosa pine/white fir forest with live and black oaks and brushy understory of manzanita and other shrubs.” Given the date and habitat, it may still be
    in the area. If I get any additional information from the observer, I will pass it along. I’m not sure to which of the local listservs this was appropriate to post, so please forward as necessary.   Tom   Thomas A. Benson Secretary, California Bird Records Committee secretary@...        
  26. -back to top-
  27. Need sightings of Redheads LINK
    DATE: Jun 4, 2017 @ 8:50pm, 24 day(s) ago
    I'm working on a statewide survey for breeding season Redheads and would greatly appreciate info on sightings since May 10th and any sightings through June. Please send me location, date, number of adults and whether young were seen or not.
    
    Thanks.
    
    John
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    John Sterling
    
    530 908-3836
    
    26 Palm Ave
    
    Woodland, CA 95695
  28. -back to top-
  29. San Diego Pelagic June 11 LINK
    DATE: Jun 1, 2017 @ 5:02pm, 27 day(s) ago
    The next San Diego Pelagics/Buena Vista Audubon offshore
    adventure is Sunday June 11, 2017. Just two weeks away.This is a 12-hour
    trip departing at 6 a.m. from Point Loma Sportfishing Landing in San Diego Bay.
    Cost is $105.We will be heading out to the Nine and 30 Mile Banks, where
    expected species include Pink-footed and Sooty Shearwaters; Black, Ashy and
    Leach's Storm-Petrels; Brown Booby; Elegant, Common, and Least Terns; and Cassin's
    Auklets.Possible species include Black-footed Albatross, N. Fulmar,
    Black-vented Shearwater, Red-billed Tropicbird,Red and Red-necked
    Phalaropes, South Polar Skua, Pomarine Jaeger, and Scripps's Murrelet.The
    last two years we have had early Craveri's Murrelets on this trip. The recent
    May 21st. trip had the secondcounty record for Cook's Petrel (the other
    record is from June 13, 1997). Could this be the "right" time of year
    for that speciesLast year's June trip also got good looks at a
    Red-billed Tropicbird. I've always liked the mid May to mid June time periodfor
    South Polar Skua. Who knows what might show up!For details and past trip
    reports go to www.sandiegopelagics.com.
    
    I hope you will join us. Call (619) 223-1627 to make your
    reservation.
    
    Dave Povey Dulzura
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
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v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.