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  1. Diving ducks in Imperial Valley on Sunday LINK
    DATE: Dec 5, 2016 @ 7:54am, 3 day(s) ago
    I birded various locations in the Imperial Valley on Sunday December 04. Highlights were a variety of diving ducks at a few locations: 4 Common Goldeneye on Singh Reservoir (Albright Rd @ East Highline Canal). 3 Common Goldeneye and 1 Peregrine Falcon at Kate's Lake (or Laura's Pond, Gentry @ Young). 4 Red-breasted Merganser at Willey Reservoir (south of New River and west of Lack Road). 1 Greater White-fronted Goose with 4 Snow Geese at Bevins Reservoir (Cooper Rd at Alamo River). All birding at the reservoirs was done from outside the posted fences.
    Jeremiah Stock Santee, CA jscls@...
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  3. North end Salton Sea, 16 November 2016 LINK
    DATE: Nov 17, 2016 @ 8:02am, 20 day(s) ago
    Chet McGaugh and I relished our weekly survey of the north end of Salton Sea yesterday 16 November 2016, from Salt Creek on the eastern shore to 85 th
    Avenue on the west.  Highlights include: Greater White-fronted Goose (22), Common Goldeneye (2 – our first observation of this species this fall), Surf Scoter (7 - 6 male, 1 female) rafting on the sea off 84 th Ave, Red-breasted Merganser (12), Peregrine
    Falcon (1), Red-necked Phalarope (16 - North end numbers peaked on 5 October 2016 with ±7500),  Western Gull (16), Yellow-footed Gull (2), Lesser Black-backed Gull (1 - 2 nd cycle along the barnacle beaches of North Shore), Glaucous-winged Gull (1
    – 1 st cycle at Salt Creek). Land birds were noticeably absent. We noted a conspicuous change during our observations with large concentrations of
    Aechmophorus sp. (Western/Clark’s Grebe) ± 2000 near the center of the sea, contrasting with counts in middle October 2016 of greater than 8000 observed
    feeding near shore around the North end.  Another noted change was the absence of large concentrations near shore of
    Double-crested Cormorant (2000), American White Pelican (3500), and Brown Pelican (300) during middle October 2016, feeding with
    Aechmophorus sp .  
    Waterfowl numbers have been increasing with 14 species observed during our observations, with an estimated 20,000 ducks rafting
    ± 1 km off shore of 85 th Ave., composed of Northern Shoveler
    and Northern Pintail, and assorted Anas sp. /Aythya sp .  Bob McKernan Redlands    
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  5. Re: [inlandcountybirds] Common Loon at Lake Elsinore LINK
    DATE: Oct 25, 2016 @ 3:23pm, 43 day(s) ago
    I neglected to mention that this morning at Elm Grove beach, on the east side of Lake Elsinore, there were no less than 5 Snowy Plovers and 4 Semipalmated Plovers, all visible in one scope view, on a sandbar that is located just offshore of the outflow channel.Elm Grove beach is located on Lakeshore Dr., just north of Main St.
    Charity Hagen
    Lake Elsinore
    
    Sent from my iPhone 6
    
    On Oct 25, 2016, at 3:17 PM, Charity Hagen daughterofmirkwood@... [inlandcountybirds] < inlandcountybirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
     This afternoon, just offshore of Perrett Park in Lake Elsinore, I found a Common Loon. The bird spent most of its time between the park and the T-peninsula, frequently diving. I lost track of it after a speed boat came along, but it was last seen headed towards the center of the lake. There were numerous peeps, ducks, and gulls along the shore between the park and the T-peninsula, including one Snowy Plover and 2 Semipalmated Plovers. Perrett Park is located on Grand. Ave. on the west side of the lake.
    
    Charity Hagen
    
    Lake Elsinore
    
    Sent from my iPhone 6
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  7. Common Loon at Lake Elsinore LINK
    DATE: Oct 25, 2016 @ 3:17pm, 43 day(s) ago
    This afternoon, just offshore of Perrett Park in Lake Elsinore, I found a Common Loon. The bird spent most of its time between the park and the T-peninsula, frequently diving. I lost track of it after a speed boat came along, but it was last seen headed towards the center of the lake. There were numerous peeps, ducks, and gulls along the shore between the park and the T-peninsula, including one Snowy Plover and 2 Semipalmated Plovers. Perrett Park is located on Grand. Ave. on the west side of the lake.
    
    Charity Hagen
    
    Lake Elsinore
    
    Sent from my iPhone 6
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  9. Re: SJWA Solitary Sandpipers LINK
    DATE: Aug 24, 2016 @ 1:51pm, 4 month(s) ago
    Of course, today is August 24, not August 25...
    Sandy
    From: inlandcountybirds@yahoogroups.com on behalf of 'Koonce, Sandy' sandy_koonce@... [inlandcountybirds]
    
    Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2016 1:16 PM
    
    To: inlandcountybirds@yahoogroups.com
    
    Subject: [inlandcountybirds] SJWA Solitary Sandpipers
    
     This morning, August 25, I was able to relocate the four juvenile SOLITARY SANDPIPERS found late yesterday afternoon by Curtis Marantz.They were in pond C1.To get there, go to the northernmost ponds, park by the port-a-potty, and take the trail north
    from there.At the first trail junction, go right.The pond to the north of you is now pond C1.The birds moved around a lot, but mostly were on the west side of this pond. At one point, three of the birds were together, kind of contradicting their species
    name.
    Pond B4 (on the west as you walk north from the parking area) had around 400 ducks, mostly Northern Shovelers, but smaller numbers of other species, including one Northern Pintail that I was able to make out. There were also several migrant flycatchers
    along the trails (Western Wood-Pewee, Willow and Pacific-slope Flycatchers, Ash-throated Flycatcher).
    I didn't have time to bird the Walker ponds, but Curtis reports that there is quite a bit of good shorebird habitat there now.
    Sandy
    
    Sandy Koonce
    
    Department of Mathematics
    
    University of Redlands, Redlands, CA 92373
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  11. SJWA Solitary Sandpipers LINK
    DATE: Aug 24, 2016 @ 1:16pm, 4 month(s) ago
    This morning, August 25, I was able to relocate the four juvenile SOLITARY SANDPIPERS found late yesterday afternoon by Curtis Marantz.They were in pond C1.To get there, go to the northernmost ponds, park by the port-a-potty, and take the trail north
    from there.At the first trail junction, go right.The pond to the north of you is now pond C1.The birds moved around a lot, but mostly were on the west side of this pond. At one point, three of the birds were together, kind of contradicting their species
    name.
    Pond B4 (on the west as you walk north from the parking area) had around 400 ducks, mostly Northern Shovelers, but smaller numbers of other species, including one Northern Pintail that I was able to make out. There were also several migrant flycatchers
    along the trails (Western Wood-Pewee, Willow and Pacific-slope Flycatchers, Ash-throated Flycatcher).
    I didn't have time to bird the Walker ponds, but Curtis reports that there is quite a bit of good shorebird habitat there now.
    Sandy
    
    Sandy Koonce
    
    Department of Mathematics
    
    University of Redlands, Redlands, CA 92373
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  13. Salton Sea (south) - 23 Aug 2016 LINK
    DATE: Aug 24, 2016 @ 1:16pm, 4 month(s) ago
    I spent Thursday, 23 August 2016 (6:00 AM-4:30 PM) in the Imperial Valley and along part of the south shore of the Salton Sea. I started the day Ramer Lake, then moving on northward through Calipatria to the IID Wetlands near Niland. I then proceeded northward to Niland where I birded north along International Avenue, then westward along 4 th Street and southward along Luna Avenue. I then drove westward by way Pound, Davis Roads and Schrimpf Roads to the north end of Garst Road and checked for birds on Morton Bay. I then moved southwestward to the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ and checked for birds around Rock Hill. From here I checked for water birds along the shoreline of the Salton Sea from Obsidian Butte southwestward to the west end of Young Road, spending the most time in the areas around the eastern side of Obsidian Butte and the intersection of Lack and Lindsey Roads. I then drove southwestward to Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge and on westward to the north end of Poe Road. From here I drove southeastward through Westmorland into Brawley and spent time at Cattle Call Park and elsewhere in the southwest portion of Brawley. I then proceeded southward along Forrester and Ross Roads to Sunbeam Lake, Lakeview Golf Course and Fig Lagoon before leaving the Imperial Valley. It was clear with little to no wind, and with temperatures ranging from 75 to 105 degrees. Numbers of dabbling ducks have increased during the past week as wintering birds arrive. Species seen and/or heard – Gadwall (5), American Wigeon (3 – three together at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge were the first that I have encountered this fall), Mallard (150), Blue-winged Teal (2 – two together at the intersection of Pound and Davis Roads), Cinnamon Teal (75), Northern Shoveler (200), Northern Pintail (35), Green-winged Teal (50), Redhead (5), Ruddy Duck (50), Gambel’s Quail (25 – including five one-day old chicks at the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ), Pied-billed Grebe (15), Eared Grebe (25), Western Grebe (5), Clark’s Grebe (5), Aechmophorus sp. (10), Neotropic Cormorant (15 – fifteen together at Ramer Lake where two adults appeared to be on nests incubating eggs), Double-crested Cormorant (1500), American White Pelican (1000), Brown Pelican (350), Least Bittern (5), Great Blue Heron (50), Great Egret (100), Snowy Egret (75), Reddish Egret (1 – one hatch-year bird at the west end of Young Road was the same bird seen here on 31 July), Cattle Egret (1500), Green Heron (5), Black-crowned Night-Heron (35), White-faced Ibis (2500), Turkey Vulture (15), Osprey (2), Northern Harrier (1), Red-tailed Hawk (1), Ridgway’s Rail (2), Sora (5), Common Gallinule (5), American Coot (200), Black-necked Stilt (75), American Avocet (500), Black-bellied Plover (75), Snowy Plover (5), Semipalmated Plover (1), Killdeer (25), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Solitary Sandpiper (1 – one juvenile at a wet meadow along Luna Avenue in the western part of Niland), Greater Yellowlegs (60), Willet (50), Lesser Yellowlegs (50), Whimbrel (1), Long-billed Curlew (75), Marbled Godwit (150), Stilt Sandpiper (5 – including two juveniles at a nearly dry water holding basin at the intersection of Lack Road and Highway 86), Baird’s Sandpiper (1 – one juvenile with a small group of Least and Western Sandpipers in an irrigated field at the intersection of Lack and Young Roads was the first that I have encountered this fall), Least Sandpiper (250), Semipalmated Sandpiper (1 – one noticeably short-billed and plump looking juvenile with mostly Western Sandpipers feeding along the shore of the Salton Sea between Rock Hill and Obsidian Butte), Western Sandpiper (2000), Long-billed Dowitcher (200), Wilson’s Snipe (1 – one in an irrigated field at the intersection of Lack and Young Roads was the first encountered locally this fall), Red-necked Phalarope (75), Wilson’s Phalarope (50), Bonaparte’s Gull (1), Laughing Gull (350 – most in an irrigated field at the intersection of Lack and Young Roads), Franklin’s Gull (2 – one adult and one first-winter bird in an irrigated field at the intersection of Lack and Young Roads were the first that I have encountered this fall), Ring-billed Gull (1000), Yellow-footed Gull (15), California Gull (75), Herring Gull (1 – one worn and faded first-summer bird at Obsidian Butte was the same bird first seen here on 20 July), Caspian Tern (50), Black Tern (400), Common Tern (1 – one hatch-year bird at Fig Lagoon was the first that I have encountered locally this fall), Forster’s Tern (50), Black Skimmer (2), Rock Pigeon (50), Eurasian Collared-Dove (200), Inca Dove (10), Common Ground-Dove (35), White-winged Dove (75), Mourning Dove (50), Greater Roadrunner (2), Burrowing Owl (10), Lesser Nighthawk (1), Black-chinned Hummingbird (2), Anna’s Hummingbird (6), Costa’s Hummingbird (1), Gila Woodpecker (5), Ladder-backed Woodpecker (2), American Kestrel (25), Merlin (1 – a female of the nominate subspecies columbarius perched in a dead tree at the intersection of Davis and Schrimpf Roads was probably the same bird present here last winter and establishes the earliest date for a fall migrant/wintering bird at the Salton Sink), Peregrine Falcon (1), Willow Flycatcher (2), Black Phoebe (15), Vermilion Flycatcher (3 – two males and a female at the Lakeview Golf Course adjacent to Fig Lagoon where this species is now a permanent resident), Western Kingbird (20), Loggerhead Shrike (5), Cassin’s Vireo (1 – one that responded to my “pishing” along the southern portion of International Avenue in Niland establishes the earliest date for a fall migrant at the Salton Sink), Warbling Vireo (1), Common Raven (2), Horned Lark (1), Tree Swallow (35), Northern Rough-winged Swallow (5), Bank Swallow (1 – one with Tree Swallows near the New River mouth), Cliff Swallow (300), Verdin (15), Marsh Wren (10), Black-tailed Gnatcatcher (1), Northern Mockingbird (25), European Starling (200), Phainopepla (1 – one in the western part of Niland), Orange-crowned Warbler (5), Yellow Warbler (5), Common Yellowthroat (5), Wilson’s Warbler (3), Abert’s Towhee (20), Savannah Sparrow (1 – one nevadensis near Brawley was the first that I have encountered locally this fall), Song Sparrow (15), Western Tanager (5), Black-headed Grosbeak (1), Red-winged Blackbird (500), Western Meadowlark (10), Yellow-headed Blackbird (30), Brewer’s Blackbird (10), Great-tailed Grackle (150), Brown-headed Cowbird (5), Hooded Oriole (1 – one adult male near the southern end of International Avenue in Niland), Bullock’s Oriole (2), House Finch (50), Lesser Goldfinch (10) and House Sparrow (50) - 127 species.   Guy McCaskie  
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  15. Lake Elsinore and SJWA LINK
    DATE: Aug 13, 2016 @ 6:13pm, 4 month(s) ago
    Today Julie Szabo and I birded at Lake Elsinore and the San Jacinto Wildlife Area. This morning at Lake Elsinore we failed to find any of the Baird's Sandpipers found the previous evening by Jeff Rash. We did find 1 Snowy Plover, 4 Semipalmated Plovers, 9 Red-necked Phalaropes, 1 Willet and 1 Long-billed Curlew. Later at San Jacinto Wildlife Area we were able to re-locate the Pectoral Sandpiper found earlier today by Mark Chappell, and we also found one Baird's Sandpiper. Both were in the Walker Ponds, in the pond northeast of the blue porta potty at the 90 degree bend. Other good birds included one Red-necked Phalarope, a Peregrine Falcon, over 300 California Gulls, and a female type Vermilion Flycatcher along the path between Ponds B and C. There is a substantial increase in water since I was there 2 weeks ago, that is now attracting numerous ducks, sandpipers, dowitchers, etc.
    
    Charity Hagen
    Lake Elsinore
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  17. really Sora....... LINK
    DATE: Jul 25, 2016, 5 month(s) ago
    I was really Sora last Thursday evening…………..okay, no more wincingly
    lame and oblique political ‘humor.’ That said, I did find another Sora on the
    opposite side (>100m away) of the same densely-vegetated, shallow pond that
    hosted another Sora on 18 July (RIV CO). I’m thus satisfied that both birds represent
    early ‘fall’ migrants and not much-hoped-for (by me) summering/breeding birds. Interestingly,
    as had occurred when I first heard the 18 July bird, I clapped my hands and got
    both the Sora and a previously undetected Virginia Rail to respond. It isn’t
    overly unusual to get summering/breeding Virginia Rails within the pond-system,
    but I hadn’t been aware of any individuals/pairs this season. One thing I have
    found especially odd this season is the paucity of American Coot nests and
    young. I’ve seen hardly any of the latter to-date, while seeing more young
    produced by the far less common Common Gallinule (an unanticipated pun, but I’ll
    take what I can get). Their habitat requirements are remarkably similar and I
    have no explanation for my observation, especially given that I have paid closer attention
    to the ponds and their inhabitants than I have in previous seasons spanning the
    past 27 years. I saw no ducklings in the ponds other than those produced by
    Mallards, Gadwalls and Wood Ducks, which thus means I saw no young of the Cinnamon
    Teal, Ruddy Duck and Redhead (the latter being a “Species of Special Concern”).
    There is still time for at least the Ruddy Duck to produce young within the
    ponds, but I won’t be around to see them (=vacation).
    I didn’t see any Black Skimmers or Glossy Ibis today, but
    heat waves and distant viewing conditions continue to be a significant issue. I
    learned that a biological survey in Anaheim this morning revealed that the 30
    or so skimmers that were present and nesting last week in Burris Basin (OR CO) had
    plummeted to 3 individuals today. All skimmer reproductive attempts had failed,
    with most of the nesting efforts not advancing beyond the egg-stage. No facile explanation
    for the failure was readily at hand. I think it is clear as to the source of
    the birds that have been showing up at Prado Regional Park and the adjacent
    Prado Basin wetlands in recent weeks.
    
    “Make America Grin Again”
    Jim Pike HB
    Only 3 more days until vacation…….
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  19. Pond Park Least Bitterns continue 7/8/16 LINK
    DATE: Jul 8, 2016 @ 8:41pm, 5 month(s) ago
    This evening, Friday 7/8/16 from 6:40 to 8:00 PM, Charity & Alan Hagen and I birded Pond Park in Murrieta. We were able to see the continuing Least Bittern family (male, female and 4 juveniles). The juveniles were seen and heard calling from the bulrush at the north east side of the park, adjacent to the blue/gray home with the gray picket fence (the home nearest the end of the sidewalk path.)When theadultswould flyin with foodfromother areas of the pond, all 4 juveniles could be seen together. The evening time is the best light if you are trying to get photos.
    
    Alsocontinuing at the park are3 Wood Ducks,two males and a female. We did not try to look for the Mountain Chickadees this evening, they areusually seen and heardalong the dirt path that goes east from the end of the sidewalk.
    
    Pond Park is on north side Murrieta Hot Springs Road, between Whitewood and Via Princessa. Park at the west end of the medical office parking lot, look for the large American flag. During the week, during business hours, avoid the 10 parking spaces nearest the park (there are signs regarding parking in those spaces during the week.)
    
    Julie Szabo
    Wildomar, CA
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  21. Western Gull, Wood Ducks, Lake Elsinore 6/5/16 LINK
    DATE: Jun 5, 2016 @ 3:54pm, 6 month(s) ago
    Today, Sunday 6/5/16I birded around the shoreline of Lake Elsinore. Despitelots of boats on the lake, there were some birds to see.
    
    Of note were a pair of Wood Ducks just south of Perret Park (on the south west side of the lake off of Grand Ave.)From Perret Park, I could also view over 100 apparent California Gulls there were all along the southwest shoreline.
    
    An adult Western Gull, probably the same one that has been seen for a while,was at the usual location, along the east shoreline just south of the outflow channel. This is just west of where Spring Street and West Lakeshore meet.
    
    I also spent some time checking on the nestingHeron's and Egrets. Historically,four species of Herons/Egretsnested along Nebraska Streetnear the corner of Lakeshore and Riverside Drives. For the past two years, they all have moved to private property along the south west side of the lake. After getting permissionto access the private properties,I was able to see several young Great Blue and Great Egrets, whilesomeadults appear to continue to incubate.
    
    I only found 2 nesting Snowing Egrets, and no nestingBlack-crowned Night-Herons.
    
    I did not bird along the southlevee, as there was a baseball game at the stadium scheduled for the afternoon.
    
    Julie Szabo
    Wildomar, CA
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  23. NESS March 11 LINK
    DATE: Mar 12, 2016 @ 9:34am, 9 month(s) ago
    Bob McKernan and I spent the day on the beaches around the north end of the Salton Sea, from Salt Creek on the east side to 84th Ave on the west. Excellent conditions in the morning went south, as they say, in the afternoon, with winds and rough water. We put a focused effort on the gull flocks,  especially the ones at Salt Creek where we spent three hours, as well as on the barnacle beaches for shorebird migrants, and scanning the open Sea for whatever happened by.
    
    Highlights of close to 100 species:
    
    Waterfowl: Fifteen species of ducks included two female Surf Scoters at Salt Creek, 32 Red-breasted Mergansers (many males) at various locations, 3 female Common Mergansers, 2+ male Blue-winged Teals at Salt Creek, a few Common Goldeneyes.
    
    Gulls: Nine species included Lesser-Black-backed Gull - 5 at Salt Creek (3+ adults, 2 first cycle), Yellow-footed Gull - 2 at Salt Creek (one adult), Western Gull - 6 (single adults at Salt Creek and 84th Ave), Thayer's Gull, Glaucous-winged Gull.
    
    Shorebirds: two Sanderlings, a Red Knot, several Dunlins (including black speckle-bellies) at Salt Creek, increasing Western Sandpipers and Snowy Plovers, lots of Willets, a breeding-plumage Black-bellied Plover.
    
    Clearly the same Neotropic Cormorant continues at the SRA  after a sabbatical. The last date I can find in my notes is January 27. (Reminds me to remind -- significant Riverside County observations for inclusion in the  "North American Birds" winter season report need to be to me this week.
    
    One more good bird - a  continuing male Tricolored Blackbird -  was findable at 81st Ave in the windstorm. 
    
    Chet
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  25. Santa Rosa Plateau birds LINK
    DATE: Mar 10, 2016 @ 9:01pm, 9 month(s) ago
    Today Julie Szabo, my husband Alan and I hiked on the Los Santos trail on the Santa Rosa Plateau Ecological Reserve in Murrieta. In addition to loads of flowers, we found a Yellow-shafted Flicker at the southern end of Los Santos Trail, not far from the junction with Vernal Pool trail. At the northern end of Los Santos we found 3 Grasshopper Sparrows, hearing 2 singing and calling and getting a visual on another. The calling birds were near the junction of Los Santos trail and Hidden Valley Rd. Just before hearing the second two sparrows we had a close encounter with a Southern Pacific Rattlesnake, so watch your step if you venture onto the Reserve. The Vernal Pools are shrinking fast, with a small assortment of ducks and shorebirds remaining. The Reserve is located on Clinton Keith Rd. 4 miles west of Interstate 15.
    
    Charity Hagen
    
    Lake Elsinore
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  27. Salton Sea (south) - 9 March 2016 LINK
    DATE: Mar 10, 2016 @ 2:37pm, 9 month(s) ago
    I spent Wednesday, 9 March 2016 (6:00 AM to 4:30 PM), at and around the south end of the Salton Sea. I started the day at Fig Lagoon and Sunbeam Lake then drove northward to Brawley, with quick stops at Sheldon Reservoir and the area around the intersection of Carter and Fites Roads. In Brawley I checked the hummingbird feeders on Willard Avenue and looked around Cattle Call Park. I then drove north to Ramer Lake and on northward through Calipatria to Morton Bay by way of English, Pound, Davis and Schrimpf Roads. From here I drove southwestward to the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ and Rock Hill. From here I checked for water birds along the shoreline of the Salton Sea southwestward from Obsidian Butte to the west end of Young Road, stopping in the area around the intersection of Lack and Lindsey Roads. I then drove southwestward to Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge. From here I drove southward through Westmorland into Brawley, then on south to El Centro. I then looked at Lakeview Golfcourse and Fig Lagoon before heading west to San Diego. The sky was clear in the morning, but with scattered high overcast in the afternoon, there was little to no wind, and temperatures ranging from 45 to 85 degrees. Many ducks appear to have left the area during the past week, and all of the Sandhill Cranes have departed. I spent much time unsuccessfully looking through swallows for Violet-green Swallows – this species is evidently rare in the Imperial Valley, even during times of migration. Species seen and/or heard – Snow Goose (95 – including one “Blue Geese”), Ross’s Goose (5), Gadwall (10), American Wigeon (10), Mallard (75), Cinnamon Teal (50), Northern Shoveler (1500), Northern Pintail (25), Green-winged Teal (250), Redhead (20 – twenty on Sheldon Reservoir), Ring-necked Duck (25 – twenty-five on Sheldon Reservoir), Lesser Scaup (6), Surf Scoter (2 – one adult male and a female together on Fig Lagoon), Bufflehead (5), Ruddy Duck (400), Gambel’s Quail (10), Pied-billed Grebe (5), Eared Grebe (200), Western Grebe (10), Clark’s Grebe (2), Aechmophorus sp (10), Neotropic Cormorant (36 – thirty counted at Sunbeam Lake first thing in the morning, single birds at the north end of Garst Road and at Obsidian Butte, two together at the north end of Lack Road, and two more at the west end of Young Road), Double-crested Cormorant (1500 – including many on nests at Ramer Lake), American White Pelican (150), Brown Pelican (150), Least Bittern (1 – one calling at Fig Lagoon), Great Blue Heron (75 – many now attending nests along the shoreline), Great Egret (75), Snowy Egret (50), Cattle Egret (2500), Green Heron (2), Black-crowned Night-Heron (25), White-faced Ibis (500), Turkey Vulture (15), Osprey (1), Northern Harrier (15), Sharp-shinned Hawk (1), Cooper’s Hawk (2), Swainson’s Hawk (1 – one dark-morph bird near Sunbeam Lake), Red-tailed Hawk (15), Ridgway’s Rail (1), Sora (5), Common Gallinule (2), American Coot (500), Black-necked Stilt (50), American Avocet (150), Black-bellied Plover (25), Killdeer (20), Spotted Sandpiper (2), Greater Yellowlegs (15), Willet (25), Lesser Yellowlegs (5), Whimbrel (5 – five with Long-billed Curlews near Imperial were the first that I have encountered at the Salton Sink this spring), Long-billed Curlew (750), Marbled Godwit (75), Stilt Sandpiper (75 – at least seventy-five with Long-billed Dowitchers at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Dunlin (2), Least Sandpiper (500), Western Sandpiper (10), Long-billed Dowitcher (1000), Ring-billed Gull (5000), Yellow-footed Gull (1 – one second-winter bird near the intersection of Lack and Lindsey Roads), California Gull (75), Herring Gull (75), Glaucous-winged Gull (2 - single first-winter birds along the shore of the Salton Sea near the intersection of Lack and Lindsey Roads and at the west end of Young Road), Caspian Tern (10), Rock Pigeon (150), Eurasian Collared-Dove (200), Inca Dove (10), Common Ground-Dove (25), White-winged Dove (15), Mourning Dove (150), Greater Roadrunner (2), Great Horned Owl (1 – one at Cattle Call Park in Brawley), Burrowing Owl (5), Anna’s Hummingbird (15), Costa’s Hummingbird (2), Belted Kingfisher (5), Gila Woodpecker (5), Ladder-backed Woodpecker (1), Northern Flicker (15), American Kestrel (35), Black Phoebe (15), Eastern Phoebe (1 – one at Sunbeam Lake was the same bird first found and photographed here by Ron Cyger on 31 January), Say’s Phoebe (10), Vermilion Flycatcher (1 – one adult male at the Lakeview Golf Course adjacent to Fig Lagoon), Loggerhead Shrike (1), Common Raven (5), Horned Lark (5), Tree Swallow (3000), Northern Rough-winged Swallow (40), Cliff Swallow (500), Barn Swallow (75), Verdin (10), Marsh Wren (5), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (1), Black-tailed Gnatcatcher (2), American Robin (10), Northern Mockingbird (25), European Starling (250), American Pipit (10), Phainopepla (1), Orange-crowned Warbler (2), Common Yellowthroat (5), Yellow-rumped Warbler (75), Abert’s Towhee (25), Savannah Sparrow (30), Song Sparrow (15), Lincoln’s Sparrow (1), White-crowned Sparrow (200), Golden-crowned Sparrow (1 – one with White-crowned Sparrows at the entrance area to Ramer Lake), Red-winged Blackbird (1500), Western Meadowlark (30), Yellow-headed Blackbird (2), Brewer’s Blackbird (50), Great-tailed Grackle (150), Brown-headed Cowbird (75), Bullock’s Oriole (5 – five adult males together at Sunbeam Lake were obvious spring migrants), House Finch (30) and House Sparrow (75) - 119 species.   Guy McCaskie
  28. -back to top-
  29. NESS March 3 LINK
    DATE: Mar 4, 2016 @ 6:23am, 9 month(s) ago
    Bob McKernan and I spent a spring-like day at points around the north end of the Salton Sea on Thursday, March 3. Signs of spring migration: the many thousands of gulls reduced to just thousands (including Lesser Black-backed Gulls (two at Salt Creek), Western Gulls (at least two at 84th Avenue, and Glaucous-winged Gull (first cycle at 84th Avenue); less waterfowl,  we did find thirteen species of ducks including three male Surf Scoters (North Shore, the earliest spring date I am aware of), three male Blue-winged Teals (Salt Creek), several Red-breasted Mergansers, Common Goldeneye, and twenty Common Mergansers (a good winter for them in the Sink).  Shorebirds included approximately one hundred  Sanderlings at Salt Creek, and a seeming influx of Snowy Plovers.  We did not look away from the Sea so landbirds were not searched for, still we encountered Peregrine Falcon, several Red-shouldered Hawks acting couplish, Inca Doves and remarkably, three male Tricolored Blackbirds at the 81st Avenue fish farm. With few records of  Tricolored Blackbirds in the Salton Sink (I know of only three at NESS and a couple further south) and increasing conservation interest in the species, range expansions (see Jaramillo and Burke 1999), a rather exploratory/nomadic tendency... very interesting to me as a perfectly fine photo (my assessment, with California support)  of a male taken in Tucson (by Bill Hopson, July 20, 2002) failed to make it through the Arizona Bird Committee. Chet
  30. -back to top-
  31. Bird Walk this Saturday on the Santa Rosa Plateau LINK
    DATE: Jan 17, 2016 @ 12:06pm, 11 month(s) ago
    Just a reminder that there will be a public bird walk on the Santa Rosa Plateau Ecological Reserve in Murrieta this upcoming Saturday the 23rd. We will likely be walking out to check out the Vernal Pools, looking for ducks, shorebirds, and whatever else we can find. Meet at the Visitor Center at 8AM, which is located on Clinton Keith Road, 4 miles west of Interstate 15.
    
    Charity Hagen
    Lake Elsinore
  32. -back to top-
  33. January 8, 2016, Cucamonga and Devore LINK
    DATE: Jan 9, 2016 @ 1:39pm, 11 month(s) ago
    Started at Guasti regional Park, immediately spotted 30 Double Crested
    Cormorants in the NE corner of the main parking area in a tree. That's
    normal, then A Hermit Thrush and a Black And White Warbler near the
    bridge in a Pine Tree. About thirty Northern Shovelers in the Flood
    control channel on the north side near Archibald, with 6 Ruddy ducks.
    Black Phoebes and Says Phoebes were abundant.
    
    Moved on to Glen Helen Regional Park in Devore. One Golden Eagle flew
    over as we arrived at 3:30 PM. Very few birds spotted after the three
    days of heavy rain, The Meadowlarks seem to have moved on, from the
    area near the main entrance, on the west north perimeter.
    
    15 DC Cormorants, one Sharp-shinned Hawk near the "wild life" trail. 8
    California Thrashers near the white dumpster container, east of the
    pool. Several Coastal Scrub Jays, same area, as well as an Oak Titmouse,
    which is recurring from last week. The Red Shafted Northern Flickers
    are near the pool gate. Oregon Juncos are now absent, there was a large
    flock ground feeding by the east parking area, near the lakes, four days
    ago... Park virtually deserted. They were stocking Trout.
    
    Jeffery G Scism
    San Bernardino
    
    
  34. -back to top-
  35. New Year's weekend Western Coachella Valley odds and ends LINK
    DATE: Jan 4, 2016 @ 12:01pm, 11 month(s) ago
    Hello everyone. I hope this does not find you folks west of the mountains out looking for an Ark to rent. In typical fashion, despite weather forecasts to the contrary, no rain yet over here in the Coachella valley. I had a very nice New year's day, with two 2 to 2 and a half hours of bird watching twice that day, sandwiched in between watching on TV a Ohio State win over Notre Dame in the Fiesta bowl (thank goodness.). New Year's morning I was in Palm Springs and the afternoon Desert Hot Springs.
    
    In Palm Springs, walking along the bike trail south of Demuth Park, which runs right along the Tahquitz Creek public Golf course, I had a flock of Cedar Waxwings, a few Dark-eyed Junco's, a ton of Western Bluebirds, a Loggerhead Shrike, about 110 Canada Geese, but not the one Snow goose that was in with them a week earlier on Christmas day, a few Cattle Egret and a Cinnamon Teal at the Palm Springs Sewage Ponds which runs along this bike trail, but which for the first time in ages had one of the ponds with water in it. Even one of the still dry ponds had about 12 or 13 American Pipits in it. The golf course ponds beside the "wet and Wild " waterpark had 6 buffleheads in it.
    
    There were 2 Red-tailed hawks in Demuth Park up on light poles, but at the edge of the water at the Palm Springs Sewage ponds, maybe 1/6th of a mile or so away, was a raptor that just sat still for like 15 minutes right on he bank of the water, and of course, it was extremely hard to get pictures of between fencing and a distance of probably 300 to 400 feet or more away from. I suspect it was a female Northern Harrier, based on what little I could see. I have not yet been able to look at my pictures as my wife has been heavily using the home computer lately looking heavily into that ancestry stuff. She's back so far to the 1720's with both sides of her family tree.
    
    At Ruth Hardy park in central Palm Springs, I re-located 14 Lark Sparrows, and a Ladder-backed Woodpecker, both of which I had seen on December 31st when I only had my scope and not my camera with me. Now I have an early start with them also on my 2016 bird list. After the football game, I went to the Desert Hot Springs sewage ponds, only to sadly see the two ones I have been looking into being emptied, and two new ones way further out of view being filled. Nothing really exciting there, but a week earlier on Christmas eve, just a day and a half out of Christmas bird count week, there was a Great Egret, and a Bufflehead at the DHS sewage ponds, neither one of which made our CBC.
    
    Finishing the afternoon at the place first called by Steve Ritt the DHS Fish Hatchery south of Dillon Rd, and about 1 mile too far south to be in our Christmas bird count, there was a Loggerhead Shrike, a Belted Kingfisher, an American Robin, a Wilson's Snipe, and a Lincoln Sparrow as well as the usual cast of characters, about 9 of which sadly exist there regularly, yet can't be added to our somewhat mediocre waterbird species total for the CBC. As of yesterday the 3rd, the Lincoln Sparrow, the kingfisher and the snipe continued.
    
    At the newly filled up two new ponds at the DHS Sewage ponds, yesterday, there were 4 Hooded Mergansers, two male and two female, and suddenly now out of no where about 50 or so Lesser Scaup, and a modest flock of Ruddy Ducks. The Scaup weren't on the CBC. We had 6 Ring-necked Ducks at the CBC and they may have been mixed in with the Scaup. One of the almost dried up ponds at least now had 3 Least sandpipers, when we only had one for the CBC.
    
    Saturday the 2nd I enjoyed helping in the North end of the Salton Sea CBC. A Dunlin, four Semi-palmated Plovers, and two Snowy Plovers were my best personal additions to that very successful CBC that Chet recently reported on.
    
    Good luck this next week with the supposed super heavy rain. Maybe some of us will get some good drop down bird species with it. Bye for now.
    
    John McCallister CPA
    Desert Hot Springs, CA
    
    
  36. -back to top-
  37. Re: [inlandcountybirds] Riverside Year 2015 LINK
    DATE: Jan 3, 2016 @ 7:32am, 11 month(s) ago
    I neglected to say thanks for a great year Julie! I look forward to our adventures in 2016!
    Charity
    
    From: "Charity Hagen daughterofmirkwood@... [inlandcountybirds]" <inlandcountybirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com> To: Inlandcountybirds <inlandcountybirds@yahoogroups.com> Sent: Sunday, January 3, 2016 7:27 AM Subject: Re: [inlandcountybirds] Riverside Year 2015
    
    To add to Julie's post, we put on at least a thousand miles on our car in our effort to boost her big year total, with several trips to the Salton Sea, Corn Springs, Joshua Tree, Lake Hemet, UCR, etc. I thoroughly enjoyed our trips together, as not only did I get to experience great birding destinations I had only read about, but was able to meet many birders whose names I had only read on this list. It's sure nice to put faces to names. Plus Julie is just a pleasant and fun person to be around, I lost track of all our high fives! Great birding at great places with a great birder, what could be better
    Charity Hagen
    Lake Elsinore
    
    From: "Julie Szabo jsszabo1@... [inlandcountybirds]" <inlandcountybirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com> To: yahoogroups <inlandcountybirds@yahoogroups.com> Sent: Friday, January 1, 2016 8:30 PM Subject: [inlandcountybirds] Riverside Year 2015
    
    Thank you so much to Chet McGaugh for your very thoughtful
    recognition! I was asked by several to
    post a summary of my 2015 big year. I
    end 2015 with 311 species seen in Riverside County. This could not have been possible without the
    help of several people who encouraged me, called me when rare birds were seen,
    and drove or rode with me long distances all over the county. A special thank you to my very patient and
    supportive husband Dale. He also would
    hear the numerous calls and text alerts at all hours of the day when a bird I “needed”
    was seen. He knew I was chasing birds
    the next day when he saw me making sandwiches the night before. And a
    very special thank you to Charity & Alan Hagen, Chet McGaugh, Howard King (301
    in 2011), Tony Metcalf, Curtis Marantz, Ninad Thakoor, David Rankin and Tom
    Benson, and many others. Bob McKernan
    (306 in 1990) was very gracious and helpful by looking at several photos, and
    sending words of encouragement!
    During 2015, I put over 17,000 miles on my car that
    included 20 trips to either the Salton Sea, or Chiriaco Summit/Desert Center. Note:
    if you do a big year, it is probably best to live in the center of the
    county, instead of at the extreme southwest corner of the county. Everything good is at least 2 or 3 hours
    away. Dale and I did a 14 hour “one day trip” to
    Blythe in May (Ridgway’s Rail, Indigo Bunting). Charity & Alan Hagen and I made an overnight
    trip to Blythe in August, and birded when it was 114° (finding Brown-crested
    Flycatchers), followed by getting up at 4:00 AM the next morning so we could
    listen for Yellow-billed Cuckoo at dawn. We successfully heard a few and saw
    one! Oh, and did I mention the flies and smell at
    the Salton Sea in the summer I had at
    least 100 flies in my car along with me while riding with the windows down at
    freeway speed trying to eject them. On
    one trip in early August, a radiator hose sprung a leak, and I limped home,
    adding water to the overflow bottle every 20 miles.
    Counting the birds was easy at first. I used eBird to keep track and entered 730 check lists. In January, I had 175 species, and at the end
    of March, 222. By the end of June, I had
    273 species. I had seen 275 in 2014, so
    I decided to just keep going to see how many were possible in one year. During the summer months, the law of diminishing
    returns kicked in, and it took me until the end of September to reach 288
    species. In October I added 6, November I
    added 13, and in December another 4. The
    last bird I saw was the Black-and-white Warbler at UC Riverside on 12/28/15. It took me 4 trips and 8 hours of looking
    into trees, and thanks to Ninad Thakoor, both Charity and I finally saw the
    bird.
    During 2015, I added 30 county birds, including 12 life
    birds. Some notables were the Bendire’s
    Thrasher that Charity & I found at Joshua Tree on 5/26/15; a Stilt Sandpiper
    at Lake Elsinore on 7/31/15, & McCown’s Longspurs on 12/6/15. Others highlights were Evening Grosbeaks at Lake
    Hemet; American Redstart & Gila Woodpecker at Corn Springs; Bobolink &
    Mew Gull at Lake Perris; Ruddy Ground-dove and Broad-billed Hummingbird at
    Chiriaco Summit; Long-eared Owl at San
    Jacinto Wildlife: Tundra Swans at Indio
    and Nuevo; Long-tailed Ducks &
    White-winged Scoters at the Whitewater River Delta; Bronzed Cowbird on 81st
    St; Gray Catbird at Cactus City; Yellow-bellied
    Sapsucker at Lake Elsinore.
    I topped the year of by participating in 4 Christmas Bird
    Counts, one of which I am the compiler for the count. At the Elsinore CBC on 12/26/15, I had no new
    birds, but we did have 121 species, plus 7 count week species, with extremely windy
    conditions.
    Thanks again to everyone who supported me 2015 in my
    crazy quest. If you would like to have a
    copy of “the list” please send me a direct email.
    Happy New Year, and good birding in 2016!
    Julie Szabo, Wildomar, CA
    
    
  38. -back to top-
  39. Re: [inlandcountybirds] Riverside Year 2015 LINK
    DATE: Jan 3, 2016 @ 7:27am, 11 month(s) ago
    To add to Julie's post, we put on at least a thousand miles on our car in our effort to boost her big year total, with several trips to the Salton Sea, Corn Springs, Joshua Tree, Lake Hemet, UCR, etc. I thoroughly enjoyed our trips together, as not only did I get to experience great birding destinations I had only read about, but was able to meet many birders whose names I had only read on this list. It's sure nice to put faces to names. Plus Julie is just a pleasant and fun person to be around, I lost track of all our high fives! Great birding at great places with a great birder, what could be better
    Charity Hagen
    Lake Elsinore
    
    From: "Julie Szabo jsszabo1@... [inlandcountybirds]" <inlandcountybirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com> To: yahoogroups <inlandcountybirds@yahoogroups.com> Sent: Friday, January 1, 2016 8:30 PM Subject: [inlandcountybirds] Riverside Year 2015
    
    Thank you so much to Chet McGaugh for your very thoughtful
    recognition! I was asked by several to
    post a summary of my 2015 big year. I
    end 2015 with 311 species seen in Riverside County. This could not have been possible without the
    help of several people who encouraged me, called me when rare birds were seen,
    and drove or rode with me long distances all over the county. A special thank you to my very patient and
    supportive husband Dale. He also would
    hear the numerous calls and text alerts at all hours of the day when a bird I “needed”
    was seen. He knew I was chasing birds
    the next day when he saw me making sandwiches the night before. And a
    very special thank you to Charity & Alan Hagen, Chet McGaugh, Howard King (301
    in 2011), Tony Metcalf, Curtis Marantz, Ninad Thakoor, David Rankin and Tom
    Benson, and many others. Bob McKernan
    (306 in 1990) was very gracious and helpful by looking at several photos, and
    sending words of encouragement!
    During 2015, I put over 17,000 miles on my car that
    included 20 trips to either the Salton Sea, or Chiriaco Summit/Desert Center. Note:
    if you do a big year, it is probably best to live in the center of the
    county, instead of at the extreme southwest corner of the county. Everything good is at least 2 or 3 hours
    away. Dale and I did a 14 hour “one day trip” to
    Blythe in May (Ridgway’s Rail, Indigo Bunting). Charity & Alan Hagen and I made an overnight
    trip to Blythe in August, and birded when it was 114° (finding Brown-crested
    Flycatchers), followed by getting up at 4:00 AM the next morning so we could
    listen for Yellow-billed Cuckoo at dawn. We successfully heard a few and saw
    one! Oh, and did I mention the flies and smell at
    the Salton Sea in the summer I had at
    least 100 flies in my car along with me while riding with the windows down at
    freeway speed trying to eject them. On
    one trip in early August, a radiator hose sprung a leak, and I limped home,
    adding water to the overflow bottle every 20 miles.
    Counting the birds was easy at first. I used eBird to keep track and entered 730 check lists. In January, I had 175 species, and at the end
    of March, 222. By the end of June, I had
    273 species. I had seen 275 in 2014, so
    I decided to just keep going to see how many were possible in one year. During the summer months, the law of diminishing
    returns kicked in, and it took me until the end of September to reach 288
    species. In October I added 6, November I
    added 13, and in December another 4. The
    last bird I saw was the Black-and-white Warbler at UC Riverside on 12/28/15. It took me 4 trips and 8 hours of looking
    into trees, and thanks to Ninad Thakoor, both Charity and I finally saw the
    bird.
    During 2015, I added 30 county birds, including 12 life
    birds. Some notables were the Bendire’s
    Thrasher that Charity & I found at Joshua Tree on 5/26/15; a Stilt Sandpiper
    at Lake Elsinore on 7/31/15, & McCown’s Longspurs on 12/6/15. Others highlights were Evening Grosbeaks at Lake
    Hemet; American Redstart & Gila Woodpecker at Corn Springs; Bobolink &
    Mew Gull at Lake Perris; Ruddy Ground-dove and Broad-billed Hummingbird at
    Chiriaco Summit; Long-eared Owl at San
    Jacinto Wildlife: Tundra Swans at Indio
    and Nuevo; Long-tailed Ducks &
    White-winged Scoters at the Whitewater River Delta; Bronzed Cowbird on 81st
    St; Gray Catbird at Cactus City; Yellow-bellied
    Sapsucker at Lake Elsinore.
    I topped the year of by participating in 4 Christmas Bird
    Counts, one of which I am the compiler for the count. At the Elsinore CBC on 12/26/15, I had no new
    birds, but we did have 121 species, plus 7 count week species, with extremely windy
    conditions.
    Thanks again to everyone who supported me 2015 in my
    crazy quest. If you would like to have a
    copy of “the list” please send me a direct email.
    Happy New Year, and good birding in 2016!
    Julie Szabo, Wildomar, CA
    
    
  40. -back to top-
  41. Riverside Year 2015 LINK
    DATE: Jan 2, 2016 @ 8:30pm, 11 month(s) ago
      Thank you so much to Chet McGaugh for your very thoughtful
    recognition!  I was asked by several to
    post a summary of my 2015 big year.   I
    end 2015 with 311 species seen in Riverside County.  This could not have been possible without the
    help of several people who encouraged me, called me when rare birds were seen,
    and drove or rode with me long distances all over the county.  A special thank you to my very patient and
    supportive husband Dale.  He also would
    hear the numerous calls and text alerts at all hours of the day when a bird I “needed”
    was seen.  He knew I was chasing birds
    the next day when he saw me making sandwiches the night before.   And a
    very special thank you to Charity & Alan Hagen, Chet McGaugh, Howard King (301
    in 2011), Tony Metcalf, Curtis Marantz, Ninad Thakoor, David Rankin and Tom
    Benson, and many others.   Bob McKernan
    (306 in 1990) was very gracious and helpful by looking at several photos, and
    sending words of encouragement! 
    During 2015, I put over 17,000 miles on my car that
    included 20 trips to either the Salton Sea, or Chiriaco Summit/Desert Center.  Note:
    if you do a big year, it is probably best to live in the center of the
    county, instead of at the extreme southwest corner of the county.  Everything good is at least 2 or 3 hours
    away.   Dale and I did a 14 hour “one day trip” to
    Blythe in May (Ridgway’s Rail, Indigo Bunting).  Charity & Alan Hagen and I made an overnight
    trip to Blythe in August, and birded when it was 114° (finding Brown-crested
    Flycatchers), followed by getting up at 4:00 AM the next morning so we could
    listen for Yellow-billed Cuckoo at dawn. We successfully heard a few and saw
    one!   Oh, and did I mention the flies and smell at
    the Salton Sea in the summer  I had at
    least 100 flies in my car along with me while riding with the windows down at
    freeway speed trying to eject them.   On
    one trip in early August, a radiator hose sprung a leak, and I limped home,
    adding water to the overflow bottle every 20 miles. 
    Counting the birds was easy at first.  I used eBird to keep track and entered 730 check lists. In January, I had 175 species, and at the end
    of March, 222.  By the end of June, I had
    273 species.  I had seen 275 in 2014, so
    I decided to just keep going to see how many were possible in one year.   During the summer months, the law of diminishing
    returns kicked in, and it took me until the end of September to reach 288
    species.  In October I added 6, November I
    added 13, and in December another 4.  The
    last bird I saw was the Black-and-white Warbler at UC Riverside on 12/28/15.  It took me 4 trips and 8 hours of looking
    into trees, and thanks to Ninad Thakoor, both Charity and I finally saw the
    bird.  
    During 2015, I added 30 county birds, including 12 life
    birds.  Some notables were the Bendire’s
    Thrasher that Charity & I found at Joshua Tree on 5/26/15; a Stilt Sandpiper
    at Lake Elsinore on 7/31/15, & McCown’s Longspurs on 12/6/15.  Others highlights were Evening Grosbeaks at Lake
    Hemet; American Redstart & Gila Woodpecker at Corn Springs; Bobolink &
    Mew Gull at Lake Perris; Ruddy Ground-dove and Broad-billed Hummingbird at
    Chiriaco Summit;  Long-eared Owl at San
    Jacinto Wildlife:  Tundra Swans at Indio
    and Nuevo;   Long-tailed Ducks &
    White-winged Scoters at the Whitewater River Delta; Bronzed Cowbird on 81st
    St;  Gray Catbird at Cactus City; Yellow-bellied
    Sapsucker at Lake Elsinore.  
    I topped the year of by participating in 4 Christmas Bird
    Counts, one of which I am the compiler for the count.  At the Elsinore CBC on 12/26/15, I had no new
    birds, but we did have 121 species, plus 7 count week species, with extremely windy
    conditions.
    Thanks again to everyone who supported me 2015 in my
    crazy quest.  If you would like to have a
    copy of “the list” please send me a direct email. 
    Happy New Year, and good birding in 2016!
    Julie Szabo, Wildomar, CA
    
  42. -back to top-
  43. Re: [inlandcountybirds] last week of 2015 in RIV LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 2015 @ 11:32am, 11 month(s) ago
    To add one bird to Chet's list
    A second year bald eagle on the beach at north shore yacht club yesterday morning
    Kurt Leuschner
    On Dec 31, 2015, at 9:55 AM, Chet McGaugh chetmcgaugh@...<mailto:chetmcgaugh@...> [inlandcountybirds] <inlandcountybirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com<mailto:inlandcountybirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:
    
    Big congratulations to Julie Szabo for completing her Riverside County year list with 311 species. Her effort, energy, and persistence, and results have been impressive and amazing!
    
    Former county year list record holder Bob McKernan (306 in 1990) and I spent yesterday at sites around the north end of the Salton Sea; scouting for the CBC. Highlights of a cold (but not windy! 32-60F) day starting at Salt Creek included three adult Lesser Black-backed Gulls in view at once, shared with Pat and Phil Gordan from the Bay Area, and an adult Yellow-footed Gull, Glaucous-winged Gull, Thayer's Gull. An incredible mile+ long beach full of gulls, with ducks (including Blue-winged Teal, Common Goldeneyes, 16 Red-breasted Mergansers), shorebirds, Sagebrush Sparrows. At the State Recreation Area we drove up on a Neotropic Cormorant, alone, close, good light on the defunct boat dock, as opposed to the usual conditions of Neotropic observations -- distance, heat waves, wind, Double-crested shadows, backlit. In the afternoon we wandered a bit for CBC access and managed to refind the Bronzed Cowbird (count week, so close to a January record and CBC first).
    
    On Monday, Mark Chappell and I took Matts Lindbladh out to the San Jacinto Wildlife Area and Lake Perris in search of North American birds for Mark's Swedish colleague. 89 species included American Bittern, Snow Goose, Cinnamon Teal (much desired as it appears in European guides), Clark's Grebe, 2 Common Loons/Great Northern Divers, Golden Eagles -3, Peregrine and Prairie falcons, Ferruginous Hawk, White-tailed Kite, Northern Flicker, Downy and Nuttall's woodpeckers, Bell's Sparrow, Rock Wren, Tricolored Blackbird, Vermilion Flycatchers, Sora, Lesser Black-backed Gull (not a big deal in Sweden; adult first found on the CBC Dec 22 by Noah Arthur), much more.
    
    On Xmas day I went looking for San Jacinto Lake CBC count week birds at Lake Perris and found a few, maybe - Horned Grebe, Gray Flycatcher, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Greater Scaup.
    
    Also on Dec 25, Emilie Strauss reported a female Long-tailed Duck in the SRA marina and a Sanderling at Salt Creek; neither seen on Dec 31, but the Sanderling could be easily missed at Salt Creek.
    
    Chet
    
    
  44. -back to top-
  45. last week of 2015 in RIV LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 2015 @ 9:55am, 11 month(s) ago
    Big congratulations to Julie Szabo for completing her Riverside County year list with 311 species. Her effort, energy, and persistence, and results have been impressive and amazing! 
    Former county year list record holder Bob McKernan (306 in 1990) and I  spent yesterday at sites around the north end of the Salton Sea; scouting for the CBC. Highlights of a cold (but not windy! 32-60F) day starting at Salt Creek included three adult Lesser Black-backed Gulls in view at once, shared with Pat and Phil Gordan from the Bay Area, and an adult Yellow-footed Gull, Glaucous-winged Gull, Thayer's Gull. An incredible mile+ long beach full of gulls, with ducks (including Blue-winged Teal, Common Goldeneyes, 16 Red-breasted Mergansers), shorebirds, Sagebrush Sparrows. At the State Recreation Area we drove up on a Neotropic Cormorant,  alone, close, good light on the defunct boat dock, as opposed to the usual conditions of Neotropic observations -- distance, heat waves, wind, Double-crested shadows, backlit. In the afternoon we wandered a bit for CBC access and managed to refind the Bronzed Cowbird (count week, so close to a January record and CBC first).
    
    On Monday, Mark Chappell and I took Matts Lindbladh out to the San Jacinto Wildlife Area and Lake Perris in search of North American birds for Mark's Swedish colleague. 89 species included American Bittern, Snow Goose, Cinnamon Teal (much desired as it appears in European guides), Clark's Grebe, 2 Common Loons/Great Northern Divers, Golden Eagles -3, Peregrine and Prairie falcons, Ferruginous Hawk, White-tailed Kite, Northern Flicker, Downy and Nuttall's woodpeckers, Bell's Sparrow, Rock Wren, Tricolored Blackbird, Vermilion Flycatchers, Sora, Lesser Black-backed Gull (not a big deal in Sweden; adult first found on the CBC Dec 22 by Noah Arthur), much more.
    
    On Xmas day I went looking for San Jacinto Lake CBC count week birds at Lake Perris and found a few, maybe - Horned Grebe, Gray Flycatcher, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Greater Scaup.
    
    Also on Dec 25, Emilie Strauss reported a female Long-tailed Duck in the SRA marina and a Sanderling at Salt Creek; neither seen on Dec 31, but the Sanderling could be easily missed at Salt Creek.
    
    Chet
    
     
    
    
  46. -back to top-
  47. Imperial Co. Curve-billed Thrasher, Purple Finch, Red-thr Loon, Barrow's, Surf Scoter LINK
    DATE: Dec 22, 2015 @ 2:26pm, 12 month(s) ago
    On Monday the 21st I birded from Brawley to Bard and Imperial Dam in
    Imperial County. The only things of any note in residential sw. Brawley
    were a Plumbeous Vireo and a Black-throated Gray Warbler, plus
    ever-increasing numbers of wintering White-winged Doves (20+). Farther
    east along I-8, the Warren Brock Reservoir at the old Brock Research
    Center Rd exit had a RED-THROATED LOON, 1 Horned Grebe, 2 Red-breasted
    and 1 Common Merganser, and a Herring Gull. The pond at the Andrade exit
    had a very impressive 500 (FIVE HUNDRED) Ring-necked Ducks! In Bard,
    the yard near the ne. corner of Colby and Flood--where the Brown
    Thrasher has wintered the past three years--that bird was MIA but has
    been replaced by a CURVE-BILLED THRASHER in exactly the same bushes!
    (The thrasher continues on Dec 22, and both days was seen best along
    concrete-lined irrigation ditch that runs along west edge of property.)
    Nearby at the Living Waters Ministry there was a PURPLE FINCH, plus the
    usual Red-shouldered Hawk and a Slate-colored Dark-eyed Junco. At
    Senator Wash Reservoir there was a female SURF SCOTER and 2 BARROW'S
    GOLDENEYES with the large numbers of Common Goldeneyes there and along
    the nearby All American Canal--all still present on Dec 22 as well. Also
    1 Common Loon. And at Imperial Dam proper there were 2 Caspian Terns, 1
    Red-br. Merganser, and 4 Barn Swallows.
    
    Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  48. -back to top-
  49. Lark Bunting at Silver Lakes LINK
    DATE: Dec 12, 2015 @ 11:20am, 12 month(s) ago
    While scoping a flock of about two hundred White-crowned Sparrows at the Silver Lakes WTP, my dad Roger and I simultaneously spotted a LARK BUNTING. Just south of the plant is a haystack, and all the sparrows are feeding in the fields near it. A scope is definitely needed as there's a fence by the road.  The sparrow flock does seem to be moving around though so not sure if it will remain by the haystack. There are also two Snow Geese in the fields.
    At the Silver Lakes Country Club (just south of the clubhouse) , we had one male EURASIAN WIGEON in a large Wigeon flock. 18 RED CROSSBILLS were in the pines. The Silver Lakes had many ducks including 1 Greater Scaup, 13 Hooded Mergansers, and good numbers of many other species.
    Michael Woodruff
    Loma Linda, CA
    
    
  50. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
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