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 Month/Year Breakdown (Top 15):

 Feb, 2008 - 19 e-mail(s)...
 Nov, 2005 - 15 e-mail(s)...
 Nov, 2004 - 15 e-mail(s)...
 Oct, 2006 - 15 e-mail(s)...
 Dec, 2008 - 12 e-mail(s)...
 Feb, 2009 - 12 e-mail(s)...
 Jan, 2015 - 11 e-mail(s)...
 Feb, 2005 - 10 e-mail(s)...
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 Nov, 2010 - 10 e-mail(s)...
 Apr, 2008 - 9 e-mail(s)...
 Jun, 2008 - 9 e-mail(s)...
 Feb, 2013 - 9 e-mail(s)...
 Apr, 2006 - 9 e-mail(s)...
 Nov, 2015 - 9 e-mail(s)...


  1. Salton Sea (south) -19 Apr 2017 LINK
    DATE: Apr 20, 2017 @ 8:32am, 5 day(s) ago
    I spent Wednesday, 19 April
    2017 (6:00 AM to 6:00 PM), birding a few select locations along the south shore
    of the Salton Sea and within the Imperial Valley. I started the day at Fig
    Lagoon, Lakeview Golfcourse and Sunbeam Lake, then drove north into Brawley,
    stopping along the way briefly at Sheldon Reservoir and for much longer in the
    area around the intersection of Carter and Fites Roads. In Brawley I looked
    briefly at the hummingbird feeders on Willard Avenue, then spent a little more
    time in Cattle Call Park. I then drove north to Niland, stopping at the east end
    of Date Street in Calipatria and at the northeast corner of the IID Wetlands on
    the way. In Niland I birded quickly northward along International Avenue, west
    along the western part of 4 th Street, and southward along Luna
    Avenue. I then drove westward by way of Alcott, Pound and Davis Roads to the
    southwestern corner of the Wister Unit. From here I drove south along Davis Road
    and west along Schrimpf Road to Morton Bay, then south on Garst and west on
    Sinclair Roads to the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ and Rock Hill. I
    then checked for water birds along the shoreline of the Salton Sea from Rock
    Hill to Obsidian Butte and, from Obsidian Butte along the south shore of the
    Salton Sea to the north end of Poe Road, spending a little time in the area
    around the intersection of Lack and Lindsey Roads, the west end of Young Road,
    at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge and at Carter Reservoir. I
    then drove southeastward through Westmorland into Brawley and south on Dogwood
    Road to near the southeastern corner of El Centro. After spending time in El
    Centro, I drove west, and looked at Fig Lagoon before heading west to San
    Diego.
    It was mostly clear
    throughout the day, with some wind in the morning, and with temperatures ranging
    from 65 to 95 degrees. Numbers of ducks have
    continued to decline as these birds depart for breeding grounds to the north,
    and the number and variety of shorebirds was noticeably less than on 14 April.
    Migrant land-birds were still present in small numbers, but the variety was much
    reduced.     Species seen and/or heard –
    Brant (105 – a flock of 105 on Fig
    Lagoon all day), Gadwall (15), American Wigeon (25 – most at the southwest
    corner of the Wister Unit), Mallard (15), Cinnamon Teal (30), Northern Shoveler
    (150), Northern Pintail (5), Green-winged Teal (5), Redhead (4), Lesser Scaup
    (3), Ruddy Duck (300), Gambel’s Quail (15), Pied-billed Grebe (10), Eared Grebe
    (75), Western Grebe (2), Clark’s Grebe (2), Rock Pigeon (150), Eurasian
    Collared-Dove (200), Inca Dove (30), Common Ground-Dove (20), White-winged Dove
    (20), Mourning Dove (75), Greater
    Roadrunner (2), Lesser Nighthawk (1), Black-chinned Hummingbird (15), Anna’s
    Hummingbird (15), Costa’s Hummingbird (2), Rufous Hummingbird (2), Sora (1),
    Common Gallinule (5), American Coot (350), Black-necked Stilt (50), American
    Avocet (150), Black-bellied Plover (30), Snowy Plover (1), Semipalmated Plover
    (5), Killdeer (25), Whimbrel (250), Long-billed Curlew (5), Marbled Godwit (2),
    Least Sandpiper (25), Western Sandpiper (1500), Long-billed Dowitcher (150),
    Spotted Sandpiper (3), Willet (20), Red-necked Phalarope (75), Franklin’s Gull (3 – three adults in
    alternate plumage with Ring-billed Gulls at the east end of Date Street in
    Calipatria), Ring-billed Gull (500), California Gull (30), Herring Gull (1),
    Gull-billed Tern (75 – most in the
    area of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ and only one, a white-headed
    second-year bird, at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National
    Wildlife Refuge), Caspian Tern (1), Forster’s Tern (10), Black Skimmer (3 –
    two together at Rock Hill and one at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife
    Refuge), Neotropic Cormorant (13 –
    three on the Salton Sea near the north end of Lack Road and ten at Fig
    Lagoon/Sunbeam Lake), Double-crested Cormorant (100), American White Pelican
    (15), Least Bittern (1), Great Blue Heron (50), Great Egret (75), Snowy Egret
    (30), Cattle Egret (1500), Green
    Heron (2), Black-crowned Night-Heron (3), White-faced Ibis (750), Turkey Vulture
    (10), Osprey (1 – one at Carter Reservoir), Northern Harrier (1), Swainson’s Hawk (1 – one dark-morph
    near the intersection of Fites and Carter Roads southwest of Brawley), Barn Owl
    (1), Great Horned Owl (1 – one near a nest at Cattle Call Park in Brawley),
    Burrowing Owl (15), Gila Woodpecker (10), Ladder-backed Woodpecker (3), American
    Kestrel (15), Pacific-slope Flycatcher (1), Black Phoebe (20), Vermilion
    Flycatcher (6 – two pairs at Lakeview Golfcourse and another pair at Sunbeam
    Lake), Ash-throated Flycatcher (10), Western Kingbird (50), Cassin’s Vireo (2), Warbling
    Vireo (10), Common Raven (3), Horned Lark (1), Tree Swallow (50), Northern
    Rough-winged Swallow (30), Bank Swallow (2 – one with Tree Swallows at Rock Hill
    and one with other swallows near the north end of Garst Road), Cliff Swallow
    (350), Barn Swallow (15 – including four with Cliff Swallows at the intersection
    of Carter and Fites Roads southwest of Brawley where this species has nested in
    recent years), Verdin (15), Marsh Wren (15), Black-tailed Gnatcatcher (1),
    Mockingbird (25), European Starling (300), Phainopepla (1 – one adult male at
    Lakeview Golfcourse), House Sparrow (50), House Finch (35), Orange-crowned
    Warbler (25), Nashville Warbler (15), Common Yellowthroat (6), American Redstart (1 - one adult male
    in the willows at the northeast corner of the IID Wetlands was first seen here
    on 23 September), Yellow-rumped Warbler (30), Wilson’s Warbler (35), Yellow-breasted Chat (1 – one singing
    near the intersection of Fites and Carter Roads southwest
    of Brawley where this species persists and probably nests), Abert’s Towhee
    (25), Chipping Sparrow (1), Song Sparrow (15), Lincoln’s Sparrow (1),
    White-crowned Sparrow (5 – including three black-lored oriantha near the south end of
    International in Niland), Western Tanager (5), Black-headed Grosbeak (5), Lazuli
    Bunting (5), Red-winged Blackbird (1500), Western Meadowlark (30), Yellow-headed
    Blackbird (2 – two adult males at the old sewage treatment pond adjacent to
    Highway 111 at the southern end of Calipatria where this species has nested in
    recent years), Brewer’s Blackbird (50), Great-tailed Grackle (200), Brown-headed
    Cowbird (30), Hooded Oriole (1) and Bullock’s Oriole (5) - 119 species.   Guy
    McCaskie
  2. -back to top-
  3. Salton Sea (south) - 14 Apr 2017 LINK
    DATE: Apr 15, 2017 @ 10:03am, 10 day(s) ago
    I spent Friday, 14 April
    2017 (6:00 AM to 6:00 PM), birding a few select locations along the south shore
    of the Salton Sea and within the Imperial Valley. I started the day at Fig
    Lagoon, Lakeview Golfcourse and Sunbeam Lake, then drove north into Brawley,
    stopping along the way briefly at Sheldon Reservoir and for much longer in the
    area around the intersection of Carter and Fites Roads. In Brawley I looked
    briefly at the hummingbird feeders on Willard Avenue, then spent a little time
    around part of southwestern Brawley and in Cattle Call Park. I then drove north
    to Niland, stopping at the east end of Date Street in Calipatria and at the
    northeast corner of the IID Wetlands on the way. In Niland I birded quickly
    northward along International Avenue, west along Noffsinger Road, and southward
    along Luna Avenue. I then drove westward by way of Alcott, Pound, Davis and
    Schrimpf Roads to Morton Bay, then south on Garst and west on Sinclair Roads to
    the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ and Rock Hill. I then checked for
    water birds along the shoreline of the Salton Sea from Rock Hill to Obsidian
    Butte and, from Obsidian Butte along the south shore of the Salton Sea to Unit 1
    of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge, spending a little time in the area
    around the intersection of Lack and Lindsey Roads and at the west end of Young
    Road. I then drove southeastward through Westmorland into Brawley and south on
    Dogwood Road to near the southeastern corner of El Centro. After spending time
    in El Centro, I drove west, and looked at Fig Lagoon before heading west to San
    Diego.
    There some high cloud-cover
    part of the day, with some light wind in the morning, and with temperatures
    ranging from 55 to 85 degrees. Numbers of ducks have
    continued to decline as these birds depart for breeding grounds to the north; I
    encountered a nice variety of shorebirds, and the number and variety of migrant
    passerines was to me impressive.      Species seen and/or
    heard – Snow Goose (11 – eleven, including two blue-morph birds, at Unit 1 of
    the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge were all probably wounded during the
    hunting season), Gadwall (6), American Wigeon (4), Mallard (15), Cinnamon Teal
    (60), Northern Shoveler (250), Northern Pintail (4), Green-winged Teal (6),
    Redhead (4), Lesser Scaup (6), Ruddy Duck (300), Gambel’s Quail (15),
    Pied-billed Grebe (10), Eared Grebe (75), Western Grebe (2), Clark’s Grebe (4),
    Rock Pigeon (150), Eurasian Collared-Dove (200), Inca Dove (20), Common
    Ground-Dove (25), White-winged Dove (15), Mourning Dove (75), Greater Roadrunner
    (2), Black-chinned Hummingbird (15), Anna’s Hummingbird (10), Costa’s
    Hummingbird (2), Calliope Hummingbird
    (1 – one female frequenting feeders near the southeastern corner of El
    Centro), Rufous Hummingbird (1), Ridgway’s Rail (2), Virginia Rail (1 – one
    calling at the northeastern corner of the IID Wetlands), Sora (2), Common
    Gallinule (1), American Coot (350), Black-necked Stilt (50), American Avocet
    (150), Black-bellied Plover (60 – including a flock of 35 in alternate-plumage
    at a recently irrigated field Kramer Road between Silsbee
    and Drew Roads ), Snowy Plover (2), Semipalmated Plover (5), Killdeer (20),
    Whimbrel (750), Long-billed Curlew (25), Marbled Godwit (20), Red Knot (1 – one in alternate-plumage
    at the northeast corner of Obsidian Butte), Stilt Sandpiper (1 – one adult in
    alternate-plumage at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Sanderling (2 – two in basic-plumage
    near the southwest corner of Obsidian Butte), Dunlin (5 – five at Unit 1 of the
    Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Least Sandpiper (70), Western Sandpiper
    (3500), Short-billed Dowitcher (2 –
    two in alternate-plumage, showing much white on their bellies, near the
    intersection of Lack and Lindsey Roads are the first that I have encountered
    locally this year), Long-billed Dowitcher (200), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Greater
    Yellowlegs (20), Willet (25), Lesser Yellowlegs (2), Red-necked Phalarope (350 –
    about 350 at Morton Bay are the first that I have encountered locally this
    year), Franklin’s Gull (20 – twenty
    in alternate plumage with Ring-billed Gulls at the east end of Date Street in
    Calipatria), Ring-billed Gull (500), California Gull (30), Herring Gull (3),
    Gull-billed Tern (60 – about fifty
    at the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ but only about ten at Unit 1 of
    the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Caspian Tern (10), Forster’s Tern
    (10), Common Loon (3 – two in
    alternate-plumage and one in basic-plumage together on Fig Lagoon at dawn),
    Neotropic Cormorant (10 – one on the
    Salton Sea near the north end of Lack Road and nine together on a snag at Fig
    Lagoon), Double-crested Cormorant (150), American White Pelican (15), Least
    Bittern (1), Great Blue Heron (50), Great Egret (75), Snowy Egret (30), Cattle Egret (2500), Green Heron (3),
    Black-crowned Night-Heron (5), White-faced Ibis (1000), Turkey Vulture (10),
    Northern Harrier (1), Cooper’s Hawk (1 – near the southeast corner of El Centro
    was believed to be a bird present through the winter at this location), Barn Owl
    (1), Great Horned Owl (1 – one down-covered young at a nest at Cattle Call Park
    in Brawley), Burrowing Owl (15), Belted Kingfisher (1), Gila Woodpecker (6),
    Ladder-backed Woodpecker (1), American Kestrel (15), Olive-sided Flycatcher (1 – one near the intersection of Fites and Carter Roads southwest of
    Brawley establishes the earliest date by one day for
    a spring migrant at the Salton Sink ), Western Wood-Pewee (1 - one near the
    intersection of Fites and Carter Roads southwest of Brawley establishes one of
    the earliest dates for a spring migrant at the Salton Sink), Hammond’s
    Flycatcher (1), Pacific-slope Flycatcher (2), Black Phoebe (20), Vermilion
    Flycatcher (6 – two pairs at Lakeview Golfcourse and another pair at Sunbeam
    Lake), Ash-throated Flycatcher (1), Western Kingbird (60), Warbling Vireo (15), Common
    Raven (3), Horned Lark (5), Tree Swallow (500), Northern Rough-winged Swallow
    (30), Bank Swallow (2 – one with Tree Swallows at Rock Hill and one with other
    swallows at Fig Lagoon), Cliff Swallow (350), Barn Swallow (35 – including four
    with Cliff Swallows at the intersection of Carter and Fites Roads southwest of
    Brawley where this species has nested in recent years), Verdin (15), Marsh Wren
    (15), Black-tailed Gnatcatcher (2), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (1), Swainson’s Thrush (1 – one at the
    northeastern corner of the IID Wetlands establishes one of the earliest dates
    for a spring migrant at the Salton Sink), Crissal Thrasher (2 – two chasing each
    other near the intersection of Fites and Carter Roads
    southwest of Brawley where this species persists and no doubt still nests),
    Northern Mockingbird (25), European Starling (300), Phainopepla (1 – one female
    near the intersection of Fites and Carter Roads southwest of Brawley), House
    Sparrow (50), American Pipit (150 – most at a recently irrigated field Kramer
    Road between Silsbee and Drew Roads), House Finch (35), Northern Waterthrush (1 – one giving
    the diagnostic metallic “chink” call-notes at the northeastern corner of the IID
    Wetlands had most likely wintered undetected locally and was under observation
    by Steve Hampton as I arrived), Orange-crowned Warbler (5), Nashville Warbler
    (20), MacGillivray’s Warbler (1 – one female near the
    southeastern corner of El Centro), Common Yellowthroat (6), American Redstart (1 - one adult male
    singing from the willows at the northeast corner of the IID Wetlands was first
    seen here on 23 September), Yellow
    Warbler (1 – one female near the southeastern corner of El Centro was the
    earliest known spring migrant this year), Yellow-rumped Warbler (35),
    Black-throated Gray Warbler (3), Townsend’s Warbler (1), Hermit Warbler (1 – one adult male at
    Cattle Call Park in Brawley establishes the earliest date by one day for a
    spring migrant at the Salton Sink), Wilson’s Warbler (15), Abert’s Towhee (20),
    Song Sparrow (15), Lincoln’s Sparrow (1), White-crowned Sparrow (5 – all
    white-lored gambelli ), Western
    Tanager (2 – single adult males at the intersection of
    Fites and Carter Roads southwest of Brawley and near the southern edge of Niland
    were the
    first that I have encountered locally this year ), Black-headed Grosbeak (5 - the
    first that I have encountered locally this year), Lazuli Bunting (15 - the first
    that I have encountered locally this year), Red-winged Blackbird (1500), Western
    Meadowlark (30), Yellow-headed Blackbird (2 – two adult males at the old sewage
    treatment pond adjacent to Highway 111 at the southern end of Calipatria where
    this species has nested in recent years), Brewer’s Blackbird (50), Great-tailed
    Grackle (200), Bronzed Cowbird (1 –
    one adult male at the intersection of Fites and Carter Roads southwest of
    Brawley was the first that I have encountered locally this year), Brown-headed
    Cowbird (35) and Bullock’s Oriole
    (5) - 139 species.
     
    Guy McCaskie
  4. -back to top-
  5. Salton Sea (south) - 9 April 2017 LINK
    DATE: Apr 10, 2017 @ 8:44am, 15 day(s) ago
    I spent Sunday, 9 April 2017
    (6:15 AM to 5:15 PM), birding a few select locations along the south shore of
    the Salton Sea and within the Imperial Valley. I started the day at Fig Lagoon,
    Lakeview Golfcourse and Sunbeam Lake, then drove north into Brawley, stopping
    along the way at Sheldon Reservoir and in the area near the intersection of Carter
    and Fites Roads. I stopping briefly at the hummingbird feeders on Willard
    Avenue in Brawley, then looked around part of southwestern Brawley and Cattle
    Call Park. I then drove north to Niland, stopping at the east end of Date
    Street in Calipatria on the way. In Niland I birded quickly northward along
    International Avenue, west along the western part of 4 th Street, and
    southward along Luna Avenue. I then drove westward by way of Alcott, Pound,
    Davis and Schrimpf Roads to Morton Bay, then south on Garst and west on
    Sinclair Roads to the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ and Rock Hill. I
    then checked for water birds along the shoreline of the Salton Sea from Rock Hill
    to Obsidian Butte and, from Obsidian Butte along the south shore of the Salton
    Sea to Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge, spending a little
    time in the area around the intersection of Lack and Lindsey Roads and at the
    west end of Young Road. I then drove southeastward through Westmorland into
    Brawley, then south on Dogwood Road to near the southeastern corner of El
    Centro. After spending time in El Centro, I drove west, and looked at Lakeview
    Golfcourse and Fig Lagoon before heading west to San Diego. There was high cloud-cover
    through the day, with light winds, strongest in the late morning, and with
    temperatures ranging from 50 to 80 degrees. Numbers of ducks and
    shorebirds have declined in the last week, but migrant passerines were more in
    evidence. Species seen and/or heard – Snow Goose (11
    – eleven, including two blue-morph birds, at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea
    National Wildlife Refuge were all probably wounded during the hunting season),
    Gadwall (15), American Wigeon (1), Mallard (20), Blue-winged Teal (2 – a
    pair at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Cinnamon Teal (75),
    Northern Shoveler (500), Northern Pintail (2), Green-winged Teal (10), Redhead
    (2), Lesser Scaup (15), Bufflehead (1), Ruddy Duck (300), Gambel’s Quail
    (15), Pied-billed Grebe (10), Eared Grebe (100), Western Grebe (2),
    Clark’s Grebe (4), Rock Pigeon (150), Eurasian Collared-Dove (200), Inca
    Dove (20), Common Ground-Dove (25), White-winged Dove (15), Mourning Dove (75), Greater Roadrunner
    (1), Vaux’s Swift (1 –
    one at the north end of Garst Road establishes one of the earliest dated for a
    spring migrant at the Salton Sink), Black-chinned Hummingbird (10),
    Anna’s Hummingbird (15), Costa’s Hummingbird (1), Rufous
    Hummingbird (1), Ridgway’s Rail (1), Sora (5), Common Gallinule (1),
    American Coot (350), Black-necked Stilt (50), American Avocet (150),
    Black-bellied Plover (2), Snowy Plover (1), Killdeer (20), Whimbrel (75), Long-billed
    Curlew (5), Marbled Godwit (20), Stilt Sandpiper (1 – one adult in
    alternate-plumage at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Dunlin
    (35 – about thirty-five, all acquiring black on their bellies, at Unit 1
    of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Least Sandpiper (50), Western
    Sandpiper (500), Long-billed Dowitcher (250), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Greater
    Yellowlegs (25), Willet (15), Lesser Yellowlegs (1), Bonaparte’s Gull
    (2), Franklin’s Gull (25
    – twenty-five in alternate plumage with Ring-billed Gulls at the east end
    of Date Street in Calipatria), Heermann’s
    Gull (1 – one adult in alternate-plumage at Rock Hill),
    Ring-billed Gull (1000), California Gull (15), Herring Gull (3), Gull-billed
    Tern (75 – about fifty at
    the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ and about twenty-five at Unit 1 of
    the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Black Skimmer (2), Neotropic
    Cormorant (10 – one on the
    Salton Sea near the north end of Lack Road and nine together on a snag at Fig
    Lagoon), Double-crested Cormorant (250), American White Pelican (50), Least
    Bittern (2), Great Blue Heron (35), Great Egret (75), Snowy Egret (50), Cattle Egret (2000), Green Heron (2),
    Black-crowned Night-Heron (5), White-faced Ibis (1500), Turkey Vulture (10),
    Northern Harrier (6), Sharp-shinned Hawk (1 – one adult near the
    southeast corner of El Centro), Cooper’s Hawk (1 – one Harassing a
    Northern Harrier near the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ), Red-tailed
    Hawk (2), Barn Owl (1 – one at the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge
    HQ), Great Horned Owl (1 – one down-covered juvenile on a nest at Cattle
    Call Park in Brawley), Burrowing Owl (15), Gila Woodpecker (5), American
    Kestrel (15), Hammond’s Flycatcher (1 – one near the southeast
    corner of El Centro is the first that I have encountered locally this spring),
    Pacific-slope Flycatcher (1), Black Phoebe (20), Vermilion Flycatcher (6
    – three pairs at Lakeview Golfcourse where now resident), Ash-throated
    Flycatcher (2), Western Kingbird (50),
    Common Raven (5), Horned Lark (1), Tree Swallow (1500), Northern Rough-winged
    Swallow (30), Bank Swallow (2 – one with other swallows near the
    intersection of Young and Lack Roads and one with other swallows at Fig Lagoon
    were the first that I have encountered this year), Cliff Swallow (350), Barn
    Swallow (30 – including two with Cliff Swallows at the intersection of Carter
    and Fites Roads southwest of Brawley where this species has nested in recent
    years), Verdin (15), Marsh Wren (15), Black-tailed Gnatcatcher (2),
    Ruby-crowned Kinglet (1), Northern Mockingbird (15), European Starling (300),
    Phainopepla (1 – one male at Lakeview Golfcourse), House Sparrow (50),
    American Pipit (1), House Finch (30), Orange-crowned Warbler (3), Nashville
    Warbler (10), Common Yellowthroat (5), Yellow-rumped Warbler (35),
    Black-throated Gray Warbler (1), Townsend’s Warbler (1 – a somewhat
    early adult near the intersection of Carter and Fites Roads southwest of
    Brawley was the first that I have encountered locally this spring),
    Wilson’s Warbler (6), Abert’s Towhee (15), Chipping Sparrow (5
    – five together at Lakeview Golfcourse), Song Sparrow (15),
    Lincoln’s Sparrow (1), White-crowned Sparrow (2), Red-winged Blackbird
    (1500), Western Meadowlark (30), Yellow-headed Blackbird (2), Brewer’s
    Blackbird (35), Great-tailed Grackle (200), Brown-headed Cowbird (30) and Bullock’s
    Oriole (10) - 122 species.   Guy McCaskie  
  6. -back to top-
  7. Wood Ducks, Lake Elsinore, etc 4/4/2017 LINK
    DATE: Apr 4, 2017 @ 8:08pm, 21 day(s) ago
    Late this afternoon, Tuesday 4/4/2017, there were two male Wood Ducks on a wooden dock that is on the shoreline just north of Perret Park on the west side of Lake Elsinore. Perret Park and the lake were otherwise very quiet (probably due to the numerous people using the park.)Note: sincethe winter rains, the lake level has risen to cover the fences on the north and south sides of the park, so there is no longer anyshoreline walking access other than at the park.
    
    A few Great Egrets & Great Blue Herons are starting to nest at the historical locationon private property along Grand Avenue south of Perret Park.
    
    At Pond Park in Murrieta this morning 4/4/2017,there was a singing Bell's Vireo and a singing Yellow Warbler. There was still no sign of any Least Bitterns seen last year, but there are some White-faced Ibis that are starting to nest.
    
    Julie Szabo
    Wildomar, CA
  8. -back to top-
  9. Salton Sea (south) - 3 March 2017 LINK
    DATE: Mar 4, 2017 @ 2:27pm, 52 day(s) ago
    I spent Wednesday, 3 March 2017 (6:00 AM to 4:00 PM), birding a few select locations within the Imperial Valley and along part of the south shore of the Salton Sea. I started the day at Fig Lagoon and Sunbeam Lake, then drove north into Brawley, stopping briefly to look at Sheldon Reservoir and the area around the intersection of Carter and Fites Roads. In Brawley I stopping briefly at the hummingbird feeders on Willard Avenue and spent some time in Cattle Call Park. I then continued north to Niland, stopping briefly to look for land-birds at the northeastern corner of the IID Wetlands. In Niland I birded north along International Avenue, west along the western part of 4 th Street, and southward along Luna Avenue. I then drove westward by way of Alcott, Pound, Davis, Schrimpf, Garst and Sinclair Roads to Morton Bay and the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ. I then checked for water birds along the shoreline of the Salton Sea from Rock Hill to Obsidian Butte, and from Obsidian Butte along the south shore of the Salton Sea to Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge, spending a little time in the area around the intersection of Lack and Lindsey Roads and at the west end of Young Road. I then drove westward to nearby Carter Reservoir and southeastward to into Westmorland. From here I drove southward by way of Forrester and Ross Roads to Sunbeam Lake and Fig Lagoon, then heading west to San Diego at about 4:00 PM. There was some high broken cloud-cover part of the day, with virtually no wind, and temperatures ranging from 45 to 80 degrees. It was apparent that a number of the wintering waterbirds had left, diving ducks were on reservoirs and ditches rather than on the Salton Sea itself, raptors were few and far between, and land-birds were hard to find. Species seen and/or heard – Snow Goose (1500 – including at least 10 blue-morph birds), Ross’s Goose (6 – one with eleven presumed “cripples” at the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge HQ and five identified with the somewhat distant Snow Geese at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Gadwall (10), American Wigeon (20), Mallard (25), Cinnamon Teal (75), Northern Shoveler (1500), Northern Pintail (25), Green-winged Teal (150), Greater Scaup (2 – two with Lesser Scaup and Common Goldeneye in the ditch on the east side of the very northern part of Lack Road) Lesser Scaup (20), Bufflehead (2), Common Goldeneye (15 – four in the ditch on the east side of the very northern part of Lack Road, five at Carter Reservoir and six on Fig Lagoon), Red-breasted Merganser (1 – a female at Rock Hill), Ruddy Duck (500), Gambel’s Quail (15), Pied-billed Grebe (10), Eared Grebe (15), Western Grebe (2 – one on Fig Lagoon), Clark’s Grebe (5 – five at Morton Bay), Rock Pigeon (150), Eurasian Collared-Dove (150), Inca Dove (5), Common Ground-Dove (15), White-winged Dove (10 – ten in the southwestern part of Brawley where now regular in small numbers in winter), Mourning Dove (50), Greater Roadrunner (2), Anna’s Hummingbird (10), Costa’s Hummingbird (3), Ridgway’s Rail (1), Sora (3), Common Gallinule (2), American Coot (500), Sandhill Crane (50 – fifty at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Black-necked Stilt (25), American Avocet (200), Black-bellied Plover (5), Killdeer (25), Whimbrel (6 – six with Long-billed Curlews near Fig Lagoon are the earliest of the spring migrants I have encountered this year), Long-billed Curlew (500), Marbled Godwit (100), Stilt Sandpiper (15 – at least fifteen with Long-billed Dowitchers at Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge), Least Sandpiper (250), Western Sandpiper (1 – one with Least Sandpipers near the intersection of Lack and Lindsey Roads was all that I was able to find), Long-billed Dowitcher (1500), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Greater Yellowlegs (15), Willet (2), Ring-billed Gull (2500), Western Gull (2 – one adult at the northeast corner of Obsidian Butte and one adult near the north end of Lack Road), California Gull (15), Herring Gull (50), Lesser Black-backed Gull (1 – one adult with virtually no head markings at the northeast corner of Obsidian Butte), Neotropic Cormorant (6 – five with Double-crested Cormorants at Sunbeam Lake and one perched on a boat dock at the north end of Garst Road), Double-crested Cormorant (150), American White Pelican (50), Brown Pelican (50), Least Bittern (2), Great Blue Heron (30), Great Egret (50), Snowy Egret (50), Cattle Egret (750), Green Heron (2), Black-crowned Night-Heron (6), White-faced Ibis (3500), Turkey Vulture (25), Northern Harrier (2), Red-tailed Hawk (4), Ferruginous Hawk (1 – one adult near the entrance to Unit 1 of the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge was probably the same adult first seen here on 4 January), Great Horned Owl (1 – one at Cattle Call Park in Brawley where suspected nesting), Burrowing Owl (15), Belted Kingfisher (1), Gila Woodpecker (4), Ladder-backed Woodpecker (1), Northern Flicker (10), American Kestrel (25), Merlin (1 – One perched in a dead tree at the intersection of Davis and Schrimpf Roads), Black Phoebe (10), Say’s Phoebe (5), Vermilion Flycatcher (1 – one male at Sunbeam Lake), Loggerhead Shrike (2), Common Raven (3), Horned Lark (5), Tree Swallow (1500), Rough-winged Swallow (10), Cliff Swallow (15 – a total of about fifteen at scattered locations in the Imperial Valley are the earliest of the spring migrants I have encountered this year), Barn Swallow (15), Verdin (5), House Wren (1), Marsh Wren (10), Black-tailed Gnatcatcher (1), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (5), Northern Mockingbird (20), European Starling (350), House Sparrow (50), American Pipit (100 – a large flock near Fig Lagoon), House Finch (25), Orange-crowned Warbler (2), Common Yellowthroat (3), Yellow-rumped Warbler (35), Abert’s Towhee (10), Chipping Sparrow (15 – a flock at Cattle Call Park in Brawley), Savannah Sparrow (5), Song Sparrow (5), Lincoln’s Sparrow (2), White-crowned Sparrow (50), Red-winged Blackbird (2500), Western Meadowlark (35), Yellow-headed Blackbird (2), Brewer’s Blackbird (75), Great-tailed Grackle (100) and Brown-headed Cowbird (5) – 113 species.   Guy McCaskie  
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  11. San Timoteo Birding March 1st LINK
    DATE: Mar 1, 2017 @ 3:56pm, 55 day(s) ago
    I spent 2+ hours birding in San Timoteo Canyon today. Beautiful day, fairly birdy. At the pond near Fern Ave entrance, there were Mallards and Am Coot, but unexpected were about 8 Ring-necked Ducks. Also near the pond were a couple of Scaly-breasted Munias. Common Yellow-throats were singing.
    
    Near the pond area, had N Rough-winged Swallows--only a couple--swooping around. Also, about 6 or more White-throated Swifts flying over and flitting around the bridge at the San Tim Rroad crossing. Not sure I've seen swifts in the canyon before.
    
    I hiked the upper trail that starts near the eucalyptus grove and loops up into the canyon edges. Quite a way along past the grove, up hillside I saw a CA Gnatcatcher in a shrub--first time I've seen one in the canyon. Also, along that trail I had two Rufous-crowned Sparrows, Cassin's KB, several Say's Phoebes. The unexpected FC was what sure looked like an Ash-throated FC--seems early to me, but had the yellow under, reddish tail, brown back.
    
    At least 2 Kildeer were in the creek bottom. Had flyover Cooper's Hawk, RT Hawks, one DC Cormorant. A mangy-looking coyote was encountered.
    
    Judith Sparhawk
    Redlands
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  13. Whitewater Delta Orchard Oriole NESS LINK
    DATE: Feb 15, 2017 @ 2:17pm, 2 month(s) ago
    This morning we made the long slog out to the Whitewater River Delta at the NESS,, and were rewarded for our efforts by finding a female-type Orchard Oriole where the river empties into the sea. The bird was quite small for an Oriole, not much larger than nearby Yellow-rumped Warblers. It was very green, with a short tail, and thin white wing bars. It never vocalized, and I lost track of it after about 5 minutes of observation. Other notables at the Delta were 650 American White Pelicans, and a flock of 12 Snow Geese that included 2 Blue Morphs. Large numbers of wintering ducks were just offshore.
    
    Charity Hagen
    
    Lake Elsinore
    
    Sent from my iPhone
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  15. February 10, 2017 Salton Sea LINK
    DATE: Feb 10, 2017 @ 3:49pm, 2 month(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    If you've been putting off a trip to the Salton Sea because of recent
    inclement weather, delay no more. Today was a beautiful day at the Sea with
    temperatures ranging between 60-82. The roads are back to "normal" and the birds
    are there.
    
    Highlights of today:
    
    81st Avenue -- 7-8:30 am: the gull flock was easily visible from 81st
    Avenue this morning, but after an hour of scoping the Ring-bills and Herring
    Gulls I couldn't take any more. Then the Laughing Gull raised his head and I
    figured if I could miss that gull, the other could still be there. Fifteen
    minutes later, the head markings on a Bonapartes's Gull got my heart racing. For
    naught.
    
    Vendel Road delivered fields of Snow andRoss's and Sandhill Cranes
    and loads of ducks. Ridgeway's Rails serenaded near the parking area.
    
    10:00 Guy McCaskie's large flock of Mountain Plovers was still working the
    dirt field on the east side of Gentry just south of New River (although they
    were no longer present when I passed by there this afternoon).
    
    I did NOT see the Harriss's Sparrow at HQ but enjoyed Black-tailed
    Gnatcacther, Aberts Towhee, Gambels Quail and the other expected species.
    
    A Sora was singing at the north end of Garst.
    
    On Lack, just north of Lindsey, there was a Neotropic Cormornant (as
    reported yesterday by Guy McCaskie).
    
    Finally (saving the best for last), I stopped back at 81st Avenue on my way
    home to La Quinta for one more try (2:00). The gulls were in the rear of the
    field so I got permission to bird from inside Aqua Farming Technology. The
    Bonapartes and Laughing Gulls were close to the fence and then ... sure enough
    ... the BLACK-HEADED GULL (a new ABA bird for me).
    
    As I headed out with great satisfaction and turned north on Harrison (86),
    a Greater Roadrunner finished off my day.
    
    Good birding,
    
    Tom Harrison
    La Quinta, CA USA
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  17. Desert Center birds LINK
    DATE: Feb 3, 2017 @ 5:10pm, 3 month(s) ago
    Chet McGaugh, Bill Hopson and I birded Desert Center today in 70 degree weather, birdier than we expected for February. Turkey Vultures were migrating north, and the lakes had good numbers of ducks, including a continuing Common Goldeneye. 22 Canada Geese had set up residence for the last two weeks according to a golfer.A Harris's Sparrow was probably a continuing bird, though we need to compare photographs with the November sighting on eBird.It was in various yards and along the edge of the golf course west of the northern lake, traveling with White-crowns.Other land birds of interest: Gray flycatcher, Vermilion flycatcher and Mountain bluebirds. Dave Goodward
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  19. Seccombe Lake - Egyptian Geese, Redheads LINK
    DATE: Jan 29, 2017, 3 month(s) ago
    6 Redheaded Ducks
    
    2 Egyptian Geese
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34030824
    
    Jeff Scism, San Bernardino
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  21. Diving ducks in Imperial Valley on Sunday LINK
    DATE: Dec 5, 2016 @ 7:54am, 5 month(s) ago
    I birded various locations in the Imperial Valley on Sunday December 04. Highlights were a variety of diving ducks at a few locations: 4 Common Goldeneye on Singh Reservoir (Albright Rd @ East Highline Canal). 3 Common Goldeneye and 1 Peregrine Falcon at Kate's Lake (or Laura's Pond, Gentry @ Young). 4 Red-breasted Merganser at Willey Reservoir (south of New River and west of Lack Road). 1 Greater White-fronted Goose with 4 Snow Geese at Bevins Reservoir (Cooper Rd at Alamo River). All birding at the reservoirs was done from outside the posted fences.
    Jeremiah Stock Santee, CA jscls@...
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  23. North end Salton Sea, 16 November 2016 LINK
    DATE: Nov 17, 2016 @ 8:02am, 5 month(s) ago
    Chet McGaugh and I relished our weekly survey of the north end of Salton Sea yesterday 16 November 2016, from Salt Creek on the eastern shore to 85 th
    Avenue on the west.  Highlights include: Greater White-fronted Goose (22), Common Goldeneye (2 – our first observation of this species this fall), Surf Scoter (7 - 6 male, 1 female) rafting on the sea off 84 th Ave, Red-breasted Merganser (12), Peregrine
    Falcon (1), Red-necked Phalarope (16 - North end numbers peaked on 5 October 2016 with ±7500),  Western Gull (16), Yellow-footed Gull (2), Lesser Black-backed Gull (1 - 2 nd cycle along the barnacle beaches of North Shore), Glaucous-winged Gull (1
    – 1 st cycle at Salt Creek). Land birds were noticeably absent. We noted a conspicuous change during our observations with large concentrations of
    Aechmophorus sp. (Western/Clark’s Grebe) ± 2000 near the center of the sea, contrasting with counts in middle October 2016 of greater than 8000 observed
    feeding near shore around the North end.  Another noted change was the absence of large concentrations near shore of
    Double-crested Cormorant (2000), American White Pelican (3500), and Brown Pelican (300) during middle October 2016, feeding with
    Aechmophorus sp .  
    Waterfowl numbers have been increasing with 14 species observed during our observations, with an estimated 20,000 ducks rafting
    ± 1 km off shore of 85 th Ave., composed of Northern Shoveler
    and Northern Pintail, and assorted Anas sp. /Aythya sp .  Bob McKernan Redlands    
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  25. Re: [inlandcountybirds] Common Loon at Lake Elsinore LINK
    DATE: Oct 25, 2016 @ 3:23pm, 6 month(s) ago
    I neglected to mention that this morning at Elm Grove beach, on the east side of Lake Elsinore, there were no less than 5 Snowy Plovers and 4 Semipalmated Plovers, all visible in one scope view, on a sandbar that is located just offshore of the outflow channel.Elm Grove beach is located on Lakeshore Dr., just north of Main St.
    Charity Hagen
    Lake Elsinore
    
    Sent from my iPhone 6
    
    On Oct 25, 2016, at 3:17 PM, Charity Hagen daughterofmirkwood@... [inlandcountybirds] < inlandcountybirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
     This afternoon, just offshore of Perrett Park in Lake Elsinore, I found a Common Loon. The bird spent most of its time between the park and the T-peninsula, frequently diving. I lost track of it after a speed boat came along, but it was last seen headed towards the center of the lake. There were numerous peeps, ducks, and gulls along the shore between the park and the T-peninsula, including one Snowy Plover and 2 Semipalmated Plovers. Perrett Park is located on Grand. Ave. on the west side of the lake.
    
    Charity Hagen
    
    Lake Elsinore
    
    Sent from my iPhone 6
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  27. Common Loon at Lake Elsinore LINK
    DATE: Oct 25, 2016 @ 3:17pm, 6 month(s) ago
    This afternoon, just offshore of Perrett Park in Lake Elsinore, I found a Common Loon. The bird spent most of its time between the park and the T-peninsula, frequently diving. I lost track of it after a speed boat came along, but it was last seen headed towards the center of the lake. There were numerous peeps, ducks, and gulls along the shore between the park and the T-peninsula, including one Snowy Plover and 2 Semipalmated Plovers. Perrett Park is located on Grand. Ave. on the west side of the lake.
    
    Charity Hagen
    
    Lake Elsinore
    
    Sent from my iPhone 6
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  29. Re: SJWA Solitary Sandpipers LINK
    DATE: Aug 24, 2016 @ 1:51pm, 8 month(s) ago
    Of course, today is August 24, not August 25...
    Sandy
    From: inlandcountybirds@yahoogroups.com on behalf of 'Koonce, Sandy' sandy_koonce@... [inlandcountybirds]
    
    Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2016 1:16 PM
    
    To: inlandcountybirds@yahoogroups.com
    
    Subject: [inlandcountybirds] SJWA Solitary Sandpipers
    
     This morning, August 25, I was able to relocate the four juvenile SOLITARY SANDPIPERS found late yesterday afternoon by Curtis Marantz.They were in pond C1.To get there, go to the northernmost ponds, park by the port-a-potty, and take the trail north
    from there.At the first trail junction, go right.The pond to the north of you is now pond C1.The birds moved around a lot, but mostly were on the west side of this pond. At one point, three of the birds were together, kind of contradicting their species
    name.
    Pond B4 (on the west as you walk north from the parking area) had around 400 ducks, mostly Northern Shovelers, but smaller numbers of other species, including one Northern Pintail that I was able to make out. There were also several migrant flycatchers
    along the trails (Western Wood-Pewee, Willow and Pacific-slope Flycatchers, Ash-throated Flycatcher).
    I didn't have time to bird the Walker ponds, but Curtis reports that there is quite a bit of good shorebird habitat there now.
    Sandy
    
    Sandy Koonce
    
    Department of Mathematics
    
    University of Redlands, Redlands, CA 92373
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-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.