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Last 5 Posts:
· Fwd: [inlandcountybirds] Ruff (San Bernardino Co.) (Apr 24, 2015)
· Kern Birdiest Count: 3:30pm, Thu, Apr 30-3:30pm, Sun, May 3 (Apr 24, 2015)
· Re: Announcement for special Tricolored Blackbird issue of the CVBC Bulletin (Apr 23, 2015)
· Fw: [CALBIRDS] April 5 Los Angeles Pelagic Trip Report (Apr 22, 2015)
· May 5 Los Angeles Pelagic Trip Report (Apr 22, 2015)
  1. Fwd: [inlandcountybirds] Ruff (San Bernardino Co.) LINK
    DATE: Apr 24, 2015 @ 10:28am, 3 day(s) ago
    Since Sialia seems to be missing several recent posts from inlandcountybirds, I am forwarding this to Calbirds as well. A Ruff was found yesterday in Ontario in San Bernardino County by Michael Woodruff. It was still present this morning (Apr 24).
    Tom Benson
    San Bernardino, CA
    
    
  2. -back to top-
  3. Kern Birdiest Count: 3:30pm, Thu, Apr 30-3:30pm, Sun, May 3 LINK
    DATE: Apr 24, 2015 @ 7:39am, 4 day(s) ago
     Hi,
    
    This second announcement email is being sent to the four California
    list servs
    which cover all or portions of Kern County. My apologies in advance
    to those of you who do not appreciate receiving multiple postings
    with the identical announcement.
    
    The 2015 Kern Birdiest Count will be starting in less than a week. If
    you find yourself in
    Kern County anytime during the 72 hour count period from 3:30pm next
    coming Thursday (April 30th) through 3:30pm this coming Sunday (May
    3rd), even just passing through Kern County, please submit a list of
    your bird detections to eBird and/or send to me via bbarnes@... in
    case one or
    more of the species you detect is new to the overall Kern list for
    the event. Although not absolutely necessary, if you know you plan to
    bird Kern County anytime during the count period and will let me know
    the where and when, it will help determine where coverage will be
    expected to be excellent and where gaps in coverage may be filled.
    Thank you!
    
    Birders from surrounding counties or elsewhere who can squeeze in any
    valuable spring birding hours in Kern into your overall birding plans
    during the count time period are heartily welcome as many of you live
    closer to some critical-to-success Kern birding locations than many
    of the most active birders in Kern Co. (e.g.: Kings, Los Angeles, San
    Luis Obispo, Tulare, and Ventura) - locations such as northern
    Antelope Valley bordered by Los Angeles Co., the Mt. Pinos region
    bordered by Los Angeles Co. and Ventura Co., the Yellow-billed Magpie
    location along CA Hwy 43 just over the border from SLO Co., western
    Kern Co. as accessed from SLO Co., northern Kern County bordered by
    Kings Co., and Tulare Co.
    
    Count updates will be posted on the kerncobirding list serv. The
    first update will be sent out Thursday night or very early Friday
    morning with the list of species reported for 3:30pm Thursday through
    to the time the update is sent. The update will list "missing"
    species first followed by those already reported.
    
    Further updates will take place periodically which in past years was
    either each evening/night and/or early each morning before heading
    out for birding for the day.
    
    The annual Kerncrest Audubon Society Bird-a-thon is interfaced as it
    is set for Sunday, May 3, 2015, the results of which will likely
    add a significant number of species to the overall total as in past
    years.
    
    Regardless of where you go birding in California during the 72 hour
    April 30th-May 3 Kern
    birdiest count period,...
    
    Continued Happy & Productive 2015 Birding,
    
    Bob Barnes, Ridgecrest, Kern County, California
    
    Cell: 760-382-1260
  4. -back to top-
  5. Re: Announcement for special Tricolored Blackbird issue of the CVBC Bulletin LINK
    DATE: Apr 23, 2015 @ 5:35am, 5 day(s) ago
    Hi folks,
    By popular demand, Frances Oliver figured out a way for you to purchase the Tricolored Blackbird issue or join the Central Valley Bird Club online without having to mail a check.
    
    Please note that if you are already a member of the CV Bird Club, you are going to receive a copy as part of your membership (by around May 1).
    
    If you wish to join the Club (and receive the Tricolored issue and the rest of the Bulletin volume, plus other Club benefits) or solely purchase the Tricolored Blackbird issue, you can do so through the same Online Reg site used to sign up for the Central Valley Birding Symposium:
    http://www.regonline.com/centralvalleybirdingsymposium2014
    
    We hope this makes it more convenient to purchase this important publication.
    
    Chris Conard
    Sacramento
    On Tue, Apr 21, 2015 at 7:58 AM, Chris Conard <conardc@...> wrote:Hi folks,
    
    Please excuse the posting to several listserves. I think the importance of the information warrants wide distribution:The Central Valley Bird Club Bulletin has just published an expanded issue dedicated to Tricolored Blackbird Ecology and Conservation.
    
    Please distribute this announcement to all you think might be interested:
                    The Tricolored Blackbird, one of California?s most emblematic species, was recently listed as Endangered under the California Endangered Species Act and has been petitioned for Federal ESA listing.  The species has declined dramatically in recent years. The Central Valley Bird Club has recently published a special expanded issue of the Central Valley Bird Club Bulletin on the Tricolored Blackbird.  The issue includes nine articles by species authorities Dr. Robert Meese and Edward C. (Ted) Beedy and other active researchers and conservationists.The special issue issue provides the most up-to-date information on the status of the Tricolored Blackbird, previous and new techniques for estimating the size of the population, and ecology of Central Valley and Sierra foothill populations. Importantly, the issue also includes key conservation recommendations regarding species recovery needs and guidelines for managing nesting and foraging habitats. Finally, it also reports on several new programs designed to protect and recover the species on agricultural and grazing lands. The special issue is required reading for anyone interested or involved in Tricolored Blackbird conservation.  Central Valley Bird Club members will receive the special issue as a part of their normal membership subscription to the Bulletin.  Others may receive the issue by joining the Central Valley Bird Club ($25/year, which includes quarterly issues of the Bulletin) or may order an individual copy of the Tricolored Blackbird special issue for $15.  Proceeds from the sale of the special issue will be earmarked for Tricolored Blackbird conservation projects. To join the club or purchase the special issue, send mailing information, and email address and a check ($25 membership or $15 to purchase special issue) to:Central Valley Bird Clubc/o Frances Oliver1817 Songbird PlaceLodi, CA 95240Congratulations to the authors and everyone who worked on this issue and especially to the Bulletin's editor, Dan Airola, who has worked for many months bringing everything together and completing this important and timely publication.
    
    Thank you,
    
    Chris Conard
    Sacramento
    President, Central Valley Bird Club
    
    
  6. -back to top-
  7. Fw: [CALBIRDS] April 5 Los Angeles Pelagic Trip Report LINK
    DATE: Apr 22, 2015 @ 9:45pm, 5 day(s) ago
    Sorry for getting the date wrong twice.-----Forwarded Message-----
    From: "Bernardo Alps whalephoto@... [CALBIRDS]"
    Sent: Apr 21, 2015 8:13 PM
    To: LACoBirds , Calbirds
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] May 5 Los Angeles Pelagic Trip Report
    
    Hi all.
    
    Sorry for the seriously late report. Twenty seven of us had an awesome
    inaugural Los Angeles area pelagic birding trip aboard the Catalina Explorer
    (Magician) on Sunday, April 5.
    
    We left 22nd Street Landing, exited the harbor
    through Angel?s Gate, headed east along the outside of the breakwater for just
    under a mile, then turned southeast towards the oil rigs. About halfway along
    this transect we crossed into Orange County waters. From the oil rigs we turned
    west northwest and followed the escarpment, a route that took us close to shore
    at Point Vicente and then further offshore again to the mouth of the Redondo
    Canyon. We followed the canyon east for a short while and then returned to San
    Pedro closer to the peninsula. A big thank you David Ellsworth, whose track can
    be found here: 2015-04-05
    07.19.30 to 16.16.35 PDT - Pelagic birding trip.kmz
    
    On the breakwater we picked up Black and Ruddy Turnstone,
    Surfbird and Pelagic Cormorant. Throughout the trip there was a constant
    trickle of northbound loons, mainly Pacific, but also at least one Red-throated
    and a handful of Common. Flocks of Brant were also flying past, as were huge
    flocks of Surf Scoters. We also found hundreds of phalaropes of both species.
    Red-necked Phalaropes were practically the only species seen during the trip
    out to the oil rigs and back, while Red Phalaropes became more common on the
    trip around the peninsula. A flock of about 30 dowitchers flew by at altitude.
    
    Brown Boobies have become the new pelagic trash bird in the
    Southern California bight, and we found at least four, probably five. One circled
    the boat on the first leg, still in Los Angeles County waters, two were seen as
    we approached the oil rigs and two were roosting on one of the oil rigs. One of
    the roosting birds flew in while we were already there and might have been one of
    the two birds seen in the vicinity.
    
    We had a few Black-vented Shearwaters, most having already
    departed for Baja California, and one Sooty and two Pink-footed Shearwaters.
    Both southern hemisphere shearwaters have been scarce off our coast. We also
    saw surprisingly few alcids. Rhinoceros Auklet was the most abundant species
    for the day, complemented by one sighting of four Cassin?s auklets and a couple
    of Common Murres. There were a few unconfirmed sightings of Synthliboramphus
    murrelets by single observers. As has been the case this winter, the few Eared
    Grebes seen were far offshore, when this species is usually much more common in
    harbors and estuaries.
    
    Western and California Gulls were numerous throughout the
    day, but the most abundant larids were the Bonaparte?s Gulls. We say then
    throughout the trip and there was a large aggregation feeding with at least ten
    fin whales along the escarpment near the mouth of the Redondo Canyon, about
    five miles west of Point Vicente. There were some Heermann?s Gulls around,
    including a few adults; the only other species were a couple of Herring Gulls
    and a single Glaucus-winged Gull. We had really good looks at several Pomarine
    and Parasitic jaegers throughout the day. Elegant Terns were abundant; we only
    saw a few Royal Terns.
    
    We did have one epic cetacean encounter, a fin whale that
    breached five times as it raced towards our boat. Seeing a breaching fin whale
    is epic in itself, but this encounter was very close. We had another close
    encounter with a second fin whale and then had some good looks at some surface
    lunges from the group of ten. A few scattered small groups of long-beaked
    common dolphins rounded out the cetacean sightings.
    
    Thank you to the friendly and professional crew of the Catalina
    Explorer (we had fresh brownies with ice cream for midafternoon snack), to awesome
    co-leader Jon Feenstra who kept the official list and posted it to eBird, and
    to all who participants who helped make this trip such a success.
    
    Take care,
    
    Bernardo
    
    PS: There is a CalCOFI trip off our coast right now and the reports are very encouraging for the area the Condor Express out of SEA Landing in Santa Barbara is going to visit on Sunday, May 17. For example, numerous Murphy's Petrels and Laysan albatrosses are being sighted. http://condorexpress.com/reservations/
    
    Bernardo Alpswww.photocetus.comWhalephoto@...310.597.0449P.O. Box 1667San Pedro, CA 90733
    
    
  8. -back to top-
  9. May 5 Los Angeles Pelagic Trip Report LINK
    DATE: Apr 22, 2015 @ 8:13pm, 5 day(s) ago
    Hi all.
    
    Sorry for the seriously late report. Twenty seven of us had an awesome
    inaugural Los Angeles area pelagic birding trip aboard the Catalina Explorer
    (Magician) on Sunday, March 5.
    
    We left 22nd Street Landing, exited the harbor
    through Angel?s Gate, headed east along the outside of the breakwater for just
    under a mile, then turned southeast towards the oil rigs. About halfway along
    this transect we crossed into Orange County waters. From the oil rigs we turned
    west northwest and followed the escarpment, a route that took us close to shore
    at Point Vicente and then further offshore again to the mouth of the Redondo
    Canyon. We followed the canyon east for a short while and then returned to San
    Pedro closer to the peninsula. A big thank you David Ellsworth, whose track can
    be found here: 2015-04-05
    07.19.30 to 16.16.35 PDT - Pelagic birding trip.kmz
    
    On the breakwater we picked up Black and Ruddy Turnstone,
    Surfbird and Pelagic Cormorant. Throughout the trip there was a constant
    trickle of northbound loons, mainly Pacific, but also at least one Red-throated
    and a handful of Common. Flocks of Brant were also flying past, as were huge
    flocks of Surf Scoters. We also found hundreds of phalaropes of both species.
    Red-necked Phalaropes were practically the only species seen during the trip
    out to the oil rigs and back, while Red Phalaropes became more common on the
    trip around the peninsula. A flock of about 30 dowitchers flew by at altitude.
    
    Brown Boobies have become the new pelagic trash bird in the
    Southern California bight, and we found at least four, probably five. One circled
    the boat on the first leg, still in Los Angeles County waters, two were seen as
    we approached the oil rigs and two were roosting on one of the oil rigs. One of
    the roosting birds flew in while we were already there and might have been one of
    the two birds seen in the vicinity.
    
    We had a few Black-vented Shearwaters, most having already
    departed for Baja California, and one Sooty and two Pink-footed Shearwaters.
    Both southern hemisphere shearwaters have been scarce off our coast. We also
    saw surprisingly few alcids. Rhinoceros Auklet was the most abundant species
    for the day, complemented by one sighting of four Cassin?s auklets and a couple
    of Common Murres. There were a few unconfirmed sightings of Synthliboramphus
    murrelets by single observers. As has been the case this winter, the few Eared
    Grebes seen were far offshore, when this species is usually much more common in
    harbors and estuaries.
    
    Western and California Gulls were numerous throughout the
    day, but the most abundant larids were the Bonaparte?s Gulls. We say then
    throughout the trip and there was a large aggregation feeding with at least ten
    fin whales along the escarpment near the mouth of the Redondo Canyon, about
    five miles west of Point Vicente. There were some Heermann?s Gulls around,
    including a few adults; the only other species were a couple of Herring Gulls
    and a single Glaucus-winged Gull. We had really good looks at several Pomarine
    and Parasitic jaegers throughout the day. Elegant Terns were abundant; we only
    saw a few Royal Terns.
    
    We did have one epic cetacean encounter, a fin whale that
    breached five times as it raced towards our boat. Seeing a breaching fin whale
    is epic in itself, but this encounter was very close. We had another close
    encounter with a second fin whale and then had some good looks at some surface
    lunges from the group of ten. A few scattered small groups of long-beaked
    common dolphins rounded out the cetacean sightings.
    
    Thank you to the friendly and professional crew of the Catalina
    Explorer (we had fresh brownies with ice cream for midafternoon snack), to awesome
    co-leader Jon Feenstra who kept the official list and posted it to eBird, and
    to all who participants who helped make this trip such a success.
    
    Take care,
    
    Bernardo
    
    PS: There is a CalCOFI trip off our coast right now and the reports are very encouraging for the area the Condor Express out of SEA Landing in Santa Barbara is going to visit on Sunday, May 17. For example, numerous Murphy's Petrels and Laysan albatrosses are being sighted. http://condorexpress.com/reservations/
    
    Bernardo Alpswww.photocetus.comWhalephoto@...310.597.0449P.O. Box 1667San Pedro, CA 90733
  10. -back to top-
  11. Announcement for special Tricolored Blackbird issue of the CVBC Bulletin LINK
    DATE: Apr 21, 2015 @ 11:51am, 6 day(s) ago
    Hi folks,Please excuse the posting to several listserves. I think the importance of the information warrants wide distribution:The Central Valley Bird Club Bulletin has just published an expanded issue dedicated to Tricolored Blackbird Ecology and Conservation.Please distribute this announcement to all you think might be interested:The Tricolored Blackbird, one of California?s most emblematic species, was recently listed as Endangered under the California Endangered Species Act and has been petitioned for Federal ESA listing.  The species has declined dramatically in recent years.The Central Valley Bird Club has recently published a special expanded issue of the Central Valley Bird Club Bulletin on the Tricolored Blackbird.  The issue includes nine articles by species authorities Dr. Robert Meese and Edward C. (Ted) Beedy and other active researchers and conservationists.The special issue issue provides the most up-to-date information on the status of the Tricolored Blackbird, previous and new techniques for estimating the size of the population, and ecology of Central Valley and Sierra foothill populations. Importantly, the issue also includes key conservation recommendations regarding species recovery needs and guidelines for managing nesting and foraging habitats. Finally, it also reports on several new programs designed to protect and recover the species on agricultural and grazing lands.The special issue is required reading for anyone interested or involved in Tricolored Blackbird conservation.  Central Valley Bird Club members will receive the special issue as a part of their normal membership subscription to the Bulletin.  Others may receive the issue by joining the Central Valley Bird Club ($25/year, which includes quarterly issues of the Bulletin) or may order an individual copy of the Tricolored Blackbird special issue for $15.  Proceeds from the sale of the special issue will be earmarked for Tricolored Blackbird conservation projects.To join the club or purchase the special issue, send mailing information, and email address and a check ($25 membership or $15 to purchase special issue) to:Central Valley Bird Clubc/o Frances Oliver1817 Songbird PlaceLodi, CA 95240Congratulations to the authors and everyone who worked on this issue and especially to the Bulletin's editor, Dan Airola, who has worked for many months bringing everything together and completing this important and timely publication.Thank you,Chris ConardSacramentoPresident, Central Valley Bird Club
    
    
  12. -back to top-
  13. Mendocino County shrike -negative report LINK
    DATE: Apr 20, 2015 @ 7:36pm, 7 day(s) ago
    Sunday - 19 April 2015 - 8:00AM to 11:30AM Light fog adorned the coast along Alder Creek for about a mile inland, however visibility was excellent. Despite three other observers plus myself from 8:00AM to 11:30 AM, no shrike was to be found. Now the last report was last Thursday. However, this bird has completely disappeared before, only to mysteriously reappear at the same location across from the trail at Alder Creek Beach overlooking the last big "fishing" hole before the trail turns west to the beach. So don't assume that the bird has left quite yet. When I left at 11:30 AM there was no one else looking ...so I don't know if there were observers this afternoon. Good birding. Bob Keiffer rjkeiffer@... rjkeiffer@... Hopland MEN CA
  14. -back to top-
  15. Re: [CALBIRDS] No shrike today LINK
    DATE: Apr 19, 2015 @ 11:06pm, 8 day(s) ago
    
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  16. -back to top-
  17. No shrike today LINK
    DATE: Apr 19, 2015 @ 10:02pm, 8 day(s) ago
    Today (4/18), Vernon Howe and I (and a cadre of other birders) missed the shrike through 2pm, when we left. Others may have more to report from later in the afternoon. We were there from 7am on; fog in the morning and an ocean breeze made birding difficult.
    Andrew Howe
    Riverside, CA
    howe395@...Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
    
    
  18. -back to top-
  19. Shrike photos 4/17/2015 LINK
    DATE: Apr 17, 2015 @ 12:48pm, 10 day(s) ago
    Arriving just after Mark R left yesterday, the shrike was refound around 12:20 on the opposite bank. It would disappear for a while, but then flew to the vegetation on the near side of the creek. It was still present until 2 PM, but actively moving back and forth across the river.
    
    Here's a link to some uncropped frames from a digiscoped video. The bird was on the near bank and flew, providing good views of the rump and tail. Unfortunately, it was a very bright day with heat shimmer, but this is a contribution toward future identification. The video is included, as well. Flight occurs in the last 2 seconds.
    
    pbacchettifims
    
    pbacchettifims Explore pbacchettifims' photostream on Flickr. This user has 153 photos on Flickr.
    
    View on www.flickr.com
    Preview by Yahoo
    
    Patricia Bacchetti
    Oakland
    
    
  20. -back to top-
  21. Mendo Shrike Photos from today LINK
    DATE: Apr 17, 2015 @ 8:39pm, 10 day(s) ago
    The Shrike was spending time on the near shore of Alder Creek where Dan Nelson and I spotted it at 10:15. For the next hour or so it flew back and forth across the creek hunting in the shrubs, ambushing bumble bees in flowers, sallying out from the ridge top. The morning light was very good for discerning color difference in its plumage, and in these photos the graduated tail, wing molt and rump, crown and body color is evident.
    http://rauzon.zenfolio.com/p859914566/h42933276#h42933125
    
    Mark. RauzonOakland
    
    
  22. -back to top-
  23. Mendo mystery Brown (-ish) Shrike photos from 4-15-15 LINK
    DATE: Apr 16, 2015 @ 9:16am, 11 day(s) ago
    Hi all. Here's a link to my heavily cropped, low res images of the Alder Creek shrike. Although low res, they provide information on the current state of the bird's plumage, such as, tail gradation, wing markings, rump color and crown color. I hope they will be useful in getting a positive ID on this bird! Below the link is some added observations from our time with the bird yesterday.
    Bird rarities and vagrants - naturestoc
    
    Bird rarities and vagrants - naturestoc Rare and out of range birds, currently of the west only.
    
    View on naturestoc.smugmug...
    Preview by Yahoo
    
    Gil Ewing and I spend 2 hours yesterday afternoon observing and photographing the Alder Creek Shrike. Gil has thoroughly described the bird and our encounter in his previous post. I do want to add a previously unreported detail of the birds behavior though. When we first spotted the bird on the north slope above of the creek, it had just sallied out and back, but rather than perching up in sight, it dove into the heavy brush out of sight completely. With in a minute or so, it reappeared and perched up, sallying out occasionally (expected behavior) for about 1 1/2 hours. We observed this disappearing behavior several more times. At one point, the bird flew from the slope's west cliff, directly south, over the creek and landed on the trail that leads down to the beach from the original overlook, where it was briefly mobbed by some swallows and disappeared from sight. We headed up to where it had disappeared and although it had dropped right down near the old gate, we could not find it. I went up the trail, while Gil circled around to the gravel beach below the overlook but we could not find it. As I was walking back down to the beach, Gil spotted the bird right where it had originally disappeared! It had allowed me to walk right past it within feet! It flew down into the area with all the large driftwood and went to several of the willow thickets where it would dive into the thickets and then emerge after a few minutes. So, this bird could be spending a lot of time down in the brush just sitting around? BE PATIENT!
    
    Dan Brown,
    Sacramento,
    www.naturestoc.smugmug.com
    
    
  24. -back to top-
  25. Shrike in Mendocino LINK
    DATE: Apr 16, 2015 @ 5:22pm, 11 day(s) ago
    The Brown (?) Shrike at Alder Creek was seen shortly after our arrival at 2:35PM today and was visible almost all the time for the next two hours when we decided to leave.
    It first appeared in the usual hollow across the creek, just above the patch of yellow mustard flowers. It preened and gave its whisper song, flew at one time to the bush lupine atop the seaside bluff, and flew over to the near side of the creek, preening just below the observation lookout.
    We were never very close to it, but Dan Brown got some more photos. The rump is brown. The back is dull brown and not reddish. The crown is grayish with some brown in it. I would have trouble calling any of the tail feathers black. They looked brown, much darker at their distal ends. The undertail looked grayer, and strongly graduated.
    Dan will post some photos later.
    
    Gil Ewing
    Fair Oaks, CA
    
    
  26. -back to top-
  27. Re: [CALBIRDS] Mendo Shrike YES LINK
    DATE: Apr 15, 2015 @ 3:02pm, 12 day(s) ago
    Hi Lee, Here are photos taken Monday 4/13 of the shrike. These are the
    latest (I did not take them but saw the bird yesterday) I heard the bird
    singing and it was a warbly call not a chatter like a Brown Shrike.
    Very interesting. LINK: Here is a link to more Shrike photos.
    http://www.bluemelon.com/caramia/californiaapril2015shrikeandothers#page-0/photo-5447818nwoo
    
    Does the Brown Shrike have a black tail in any plumage? Or another
    possible species?
    
    Tanks for the help,
    Ruth Rudesill
    Kenwood CA
    
    On 2015-04-15 13:03, LGREUK400@... [CALBIRDS] wrote:
    > Many, many thanks for this link Monte - an intriguing bird
    >
    > http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/shrike_red-backed [1]
    >
    > This individual has all of the hallmarks of a _lucionensis_ ASIATIC
    > BROWN SHRIKE - a first-winter moulting through to first-summer.
    > Certainly doesn't strike me as being a Red-backed Shrike of any form
    > but intergrades between Isabelline, Red-backed and Asiatic Brown
    > Shrikes can come in all guises in the overlap zones. My vote would be
    > for ABS
    >
    > Very best wishes
    >
    > Lee Evans
    >
    > You can now follow Lee on Twitter at LeeEvansBirding
    >
    > Make your records go much further and contribute towards the
    > protection, knowledge and further education of our native wildlife -
    > join up to BIRDTRACK today - you know it makes sense -
    > http://blx1.bto.org/birdtrack/main/data-home.jsp
    >
    > Lee G R Evans, Ornithological Consultant, Author, Bird Guide & Tour
    > Leader
    > General Ornithology - www.uk400clubonline.co.uk [2]
    > British Birding Association - http://bbabirding.blogspot.co.uk [3]
    > Professional Guiding - Latest Tour Information -
    > http://ultimateguidingbirdwise.blogspot.co.uk/ [4]
    > Breaking News/Bird Information/Announcements -
    > http://uk400clubrarebirdalert.blogspot.co.uk [5]
    > Rare Birds in Britain - http://rarebirdsinbritain.blogspot.co.uk/ [6]
    > Western Palearctic Bird News -
    > http://rarebirdsinthewesternpalearctic.blogspot.co.uk/ [7]
    > Items For Sale or Exchange -
    > http://leesmemorabiliaandcollectables.blogspot.co.uk/ [8]
    >
    > Local Websites
    > Bedfordshire Birding - http://bedfordshirebirding.blogspot.co.uk/ [9]
    > Hertfordshire Birding - http://hertfordshirebirding.blogspot.co.uk/
    > [10]
    > Buckinghamshire Birding -
    > http://buckinghamshirebirding.blogspot.co.uk/ [11]
    > Birds of Tring Reservoirs -
    > http://birdingtringreservoirs.blogspot.co.uk/ [12]
    > Amersham Birding - http://birdingamersham.blogspot.co.uk/ [13]
    >
    >
    > Links:
    > ------
    > [1] http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/shrike_red-backed
    > [2] http://www.uk400clubonline.co.uk/
    > [3] http://bbabirding.blogspot.co.uk/
    > [4] http://ultimateguidingbirdwise.blogspot.co.uk/
    > [5] http://uk400clubrarebirdalert.blogspot.co.uk/
    > [6] http://rarebirdsinbritain.blogspot.co.uk/
    > [7] http://rarebirdsinthewesternpalearctic.blogspot.co.uk/
    > [8] http://leesmemorabiliaandcollectables.blogspot.co.uk/
    > [9] http://bedfordshirebirding.blogspot.co.uk/
    > [10] http://hertfordshirebirding.blogspot.co.uk/
    > [11] http://buckinghamshirebirding.blogspot.co.uk/
    > [12] http://birdingtringreservoirs.blogspot.co.uk/
    > [13] http://birdingamersham.blogspot.co.uk/
    > [14]
    > https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/CALBIRDS/conversations/messages/11953;_ylc=X3oDMTJxZ3VmbXNmBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM0ODI0NjQEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BG1zZ0lkAzExOTUzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3JwbHkEc3RpbWUDMTQyOTEyODIzNg--?act=reply&messageNum=11953
    > [15]
    > https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/CALBIRDS/conversations/newtopic;_ylc=X3oDMTJlcWNmdXJhBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM0ODI0NjQEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA250cGMEc3RpbWUDMTQyOTEyODIzNg--
    > [16]
    > https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/CALBIRDS/conversations/topics/11951;_ylc=X3oDMTM2cWV1MGxuBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM0ODI0NjQEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BG1zZ0lkAzExOTUzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3Z0cGMEc3RpbWUDMTQyOTEyODIzNgR0cGNJZAMxMTk1MQ--
    > [17] http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CALBIRDS
    > [18]
    > https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/CALBIRDS/info;_ylc=X3oDMTJlNmJlYThsBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM0ODI0NjQEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZnaHAEc3RpbWUDMTQyOTEyODIzNQ--
    > [19]
    > https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/CALBIRDS/members/all;_ylc=X3oDMTJmdTFrMGF0BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM0ODI0NjQEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZtYnJzBHN0aW1lAzE0MjkxMjgyMzU-
    > [20]
    > https://groups.yahoo.com/neo;_ylc=X3oDMTJkaXU2YmRzBF9TAzk3NDc2NTkwBGdycElkAzM0ODI0NjQEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg3BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2dmcARzdGltZQMxNDI5MTI4MjM2
    > [21] https://info.yahoo.com/privacy/us/yahoo/groups/details.html
    > [22] https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/
    
    
  28. -back to top-
  29. Re: [CALBIRDS] Mendo Shrike YES LINK
    DATE: Apr 15, 2015 @ 1:03pm, 12 day(s) ago
    Many, many thanks for this link Monte - an intriguing bird
    http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/shrike_red-backed
    
    This individual has all of the hallmarks of a lucionensis ASIATIC
    BROWN SHRIKE - a first-winter moulting through to first-summer. Certainly
    doesn't strike me as being a Red-backed Shrike of any form but intergrades
    between Isabelline, Red-backed and Asiatic Brown Shrikes can come in all guises
    in the overlap zones. My vote would be for ABS
    
    Very best wishes
    Lee Evans
    
    You can now follow Lee on Twitter at LeeEvansBirdingMake
    your records go much further and contribute towards the protection, knowledge
    and further education of our native wildlife - join up to BIRDTRACK today - you
    know it makes sense -
    http://blx1.bto.org/birdtrack/main/data-home.jspLee G
    R Evans, Ornithological Consultant, Author, Bird Guide & Tour
    LeaderGeneral Ornithology - www.uk400clubonline.co.ukBritish
    Birding Association - http://bbabirding.blogspot.co.ukProfessional
    Guiding - Latest Tour Information - http://ultimateguidingbirdwise.blogspot.co.uk/Breaking
    News/Bird Information/Announcements - http://uk400clubrarebirdalert.blogspot.co.ukRare
    Birds in Britain - http://rarebirdsinbritain.blogspot.co.uk/Western
    Palearctic Bird News - http://rarebirdsinthewesternpalearctic.blogspot.co.uk/Items
    For Sale or Exchange - http://leesmemorabiliaandcollectables.blogspot.co.uk/Local
    WebsitesBedfordshire Birding - http://bedfordshirebirding.blogspot.co.uk/Hertfordshire
    Birding - http://hertfordshirebirding.blogspot.co.uk/Buckinghamshire
    Birding - http://buckinghamshirebirding.blogspot.co.uk/Birds
    of Tring Reservoirs - http://birdingtringreservoirs.blogspot.co.uk/Amersham
    Birding - http://birdingamersham.blogspot.co.uk/
  30. -back to top-
  31. Re: [CALBIRDS] Mendo Shrike YES LINK
    DATE: Apr 15, 2015 @ 11:19am, 12 day(s) ago
    Can anyone direct me to recent images taken of this shrike. From what
    people are describing, sounds like an intergrade. Asiatic Brown Shrike of any
    age has a diagnostic tail shape, graduated towards the outers
    
    Best wishes
    
    Lee Evans
    You can now follow Lee on Twitter at LeeEvansBirdingMake
    your records go much further and contribute towards the protection, knowledge
    and further education of our native wildlife - join up to BIRDTRACK today - you
    know it makes sense -
    http://blx1.bto.org/birdtrack/main/data-home.jspLee G
    R Evans, Ornithological Consultant, Author, Bird Guide & Tour
    LeaderGeneral Ornithology - www.uk400clubonline.co.ukBritish
    Birding Association - http://bbabirding.blogspot.co.ukProfessional
    Guiding - Latest Tour Information - http://ultimateguidingbirdwise.blogspot.co.uk/Breaking
    News/Bird Information/Announcements - http://uk400clubrarebirdalert.blogspot.co.ukRare
    Birds in Britain - http://rarebirdsinbritain.blogspot.co.uk/Western
    Palearctic Bird News - http://rarebirdsinthewesternpalearctic.blogspot.co.uk/Items
    For Sale or Exchange - http://leesmemorabiliaandcollectables.blogspot.co.uk/Local
    WebsitesBedfordshire Birding - http://bedfordshirebirding.blogspot.co.uk/Hertfordshire
    Birding - http://hertfordshirebirding.blogspot.co.uk/Buckinghamshire
    Birding - http://buckinghamshirebirding.blogspot.co.uk/Birds
    of Tring Reservoirs - http://birdingtringreservoirs.blogspot.co.uk/Amersham
    Birding - http://birdingamersham.blogspot.co.uk/
    
    
  32. -back to top-
  33. Mendo Shrike YES LINK
    DATE: Apr 15, 2015 @ 5:16pm, 12 day(s) ago
    Three times the charm! This morning (4/14)I watched the Asian/
    Red-backed Shrike for an hour and a half (approx. 11am- 12:20pm or so)
    He was in his usual location across the creek from the overlook in the
    low bushes in the draw above the creek towards the top. He sat in the
    sun for a long while. There was a cold wind but that slope is out of the
    wind -which is probably why he hangs out there.
    
    Then he moved around a bit (by this time I had hiked down to the creek)
    I got some pictures, not as good as those posted yesterday. But I did
    hear the shrike sing: warbling, bubbly a little scrathcy at times, not
    much and definitely nothing like a Brown Shrike chatter.
    
    I saw this bird very poorly on March 17th - back view only. Now the
    bird is much brighter - more reddish on back, darker on the tail and
    mask. Breast is a pinky blush.
    
    No one else was there this morning - which was too bad but also kind of
    nice to have my own time with this very special bird.
    
    Ruthie Rudesill
    Kenwood CA PS a sub-adult Bald Eagle flew over the mouth of the
    creek too!
    
    
  34. -back to top-
  35. Fwd: Link to Shrike photos LINK
    DATE: Apr 14, 2015 @ 3:31pm, 13 day(s) ago
    
    Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
    
    -------- Original message --------
    
    Below is a link to more Shrike photos.
    Taken by Shirley and Dan Wilkerson of Texas yesterday April 12 in Mendocino County.
    
    http://www.bluemelon.com/caramia/californiaapril2015shrikeandothers#page-0/photo-5447818
    
    Lisa Hug
    Sebastopol Ca
    
    
    
    
  36. -back to top-
  37. Shrike species ID considering new photos? LINK
    DATE: Apr 14, 2015 @ 3:22pm, 13 day(s) ago
    
    #ygrps-yiv-1301433648 div.ygrps-yiv-1301433648attach-table div.ygrps-yiv-1301433648attach-row div div span {
    font-weight:normal;}
    
    #ygrps-yiv-1301433648 div.ygrps-yiv-1301433648ygrp-file-title {
    font-weight:bold;}
    #ygrps-yiv-1301433648
    
    Additional
    photos from 13 April 2015,  Alder Creek mouth, (north of
    Manchester) MEN.
    
    For Shirley & Dan Wilkerson
    
    (Karen
    Havlena)
    Mendocino
    County, CA
     
    From:
    Shirley Wilkerson
    Sent:
    Tuesday, April 14, 2015 10:02 AM
    To:
    birdbop@... ; lisahug@... ; Geoff Heinecken
    Subject:
    Fwd: Link to Shrike photos
    
     
    
     
    Here
    is a link to more Shrike photos.
     
    http://www.bluemelon.com/caramia/californiaapril2015shrikeandothers#page-0/photo-5447818
     
    We
    enjoyed birding with you all.  Please post
    to Calbirds, and anywhere else you like. 
    These are cropped, and some lightened or
    darkened.  Untouched originals are available
    after we get home tomorrow, but let me know
    whch ones -- don't want to send all huge
    files, unless necessary.
     
    Kindest
    regards,
    Shirley
    and Dan Wilkerson
    
     
    
    No virus found in this message.
    Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
    Version: 2015.0.5863 / Virus Database: 4328/9512 -
    Release Date: 04/11/15
    
    --
    Bob & Carol Yutzy
    Shasta, CA
  38. -back to top-
  39. Fwd: Link to More Shrike photos LINK
    DATE: Apr 14, 2015 @ 2:34pm, 13 day(s) ago
    
    Additional photos from 13 April 2015, Alder Creek mouth, (north of Manchester) MEN.
    
    For Shirley & Dan Wilkerson
    
    (Karen Havlena)
    Mendocino County, CA
    
    From: Shirley Wilkerson
    Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 10:02 AM
    To: birdbop@... ; lisahug@... ;
    Geoff Heinecken
    Subject: Fwd: Link to Shrike photos
    
    
    
    Here is a link to more Shrike photos.
    
    http://www.bluemelon.com/caramia/californiaapril2015shrikeandothers#page-0/photo-5447818
    
    We enjoyed birding with you all. Please post to Calbirds, and
    anywhere else you like. These are cropped, and some lightened or
    darkened. Untouched originals are available after we get home tomorrow,
    but let me know whch ones -- don't want to send all huge files, unless
    necessary.
    
    Kindest regards,
    Shirley and Dan Wilkerson
    
    
    
    No virus found in this
    message.Checked by AVG - www.avg.comVersion: 2015.0.5863 / Virus
    Database: 4328/9512 - Release Date: 04/11/15
    
    
    
    
    
    
  40. -back to top-
  41. The MEN SHRIKE Seen Again, Monday 04/13/15 LINK
    DATE: Apr 13, 2015 @ 2:35pm, 14 day(s) ago
    Mon, 13 April 2015 -- Lisa Hug refound the Mendocino SHRIKE this afternoon around 1:45-PM. Several other birders were with her. The bird was seen from the overlook at the north end of Alder Creek Beach Road.
    
    Photos were being taken from the rocky, creek bank.
    
    For Lisa Hug
    
    (Karen Havlena)
    Mendocino County, CA
    
    
  42. -back to top-
  43. Re: Shrike in Mendo LINK
    DATE: Apr 13, 2015 @ 9:14pm, 14 day(s) ago
    No shrike was found today, Sunday April 12th. yet the area was watched from about 7:30AM to 5:30Pm continuously. I was able to get permission from the landowner (who I know) to check out the area "above" (like the small pond area mentioned before) ... and I checked that area both at noon and 5:00PM with no luck. The bird has done this before... mysteriously disappearing then abruptly reappearing out of nowhere .... so there is still hope. Good birding. Bob Keiffer rjkeiffer@... rjkeiffer@... 
  44. -back to top-
  45. Mendo Shrike- NO LINK
    DATE: Apr 13, 2015 @ 9:13pm, 14 day(s) ago
    A dozen or so birders came and went from 7:30 until 4:30 without seeing the Shrike. Mark RauzonOakland
    
    
  46. -back to top-
  47. no Rustic Bunting at Golden Gate Park LINK
    DATE: Apr 13, 2015 @ 8:36pm, 14 day(s) ago
    Hey all,I spent about an hour and a half at the Rustic Bunting spot at the ball fields just to see if I'd have any luck. 3pm on a weekend probably wasn't the best time. Just wanted to pass along a confirmed negative. Jesse EllisSaint Paul, MN
    
    
  48. -back to top-
  49. Shrike in Mendo LINK
    DATE: Apr 12, 2015 @ 7:46pm, 15 day(s) ago
    I RE:ed Paul Lehman's post but don't know if it went through. At any rate here is the post.
    
    4/11/15 7:30 pm
    
    The Shrike continued today at the mouth of Alder Creek in Mendocino County. The bird appeared above the "red" bluff and I was only given five minutes before it flew over the hill to the North. There were two birders from San Francisco that arrived about fifteen minutes after the sighting who remained after I left. I am hoping they saw the bird and got better photo's. The one photo I am posting was from the observation area just off the road. The bird flew out of site before I could get any better shots.
    
    I noticed since my first sighting on March 13th that the crown seemed less brown and more gray. The back seemed the same rufous/brown color. Overall it seemed the bird was a lighter color (less buff) on the underparts. As the pro's suggested, the bird probably still has a few more weeks to hang around. Hopefully photographers with good cameras can get some good photo's after the bird completes it's molt. Steve Stump
    
    Brown Shrike
    
    Brown ShrikeTo take full advantage of Flickr, you should use a JavaScript-enabled browser and install the latest version of the Adobe Flash Player. Brown Shrike
    
    View on www.flickr.com
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-revision history-
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'. 




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