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trending topics in last 20 posts.
Last 5 Posts:
· Monterey Seabirds (TODAY)
· Red-footed Booby at Newport Pier 23 July (Jul 28, 2015)
· Half Moon Bay pelagic report - jul 26 (Jul 27, 2015)
· Monterey pelagic (Jul 26, 2015)
· Re: [CALBIRDS] Heermann's Gull juveniles? Current warm water conditions. (Jul 26, 2015)
  1. Monterey Seabirds LINK
    DATE: TODAY @ 9:43pm, TODAY
    Howdy, CalBirders,
    Monterey's seabirds are really putting on a show this week. Upwards of 2000 SABINE'S GULLS, 90,000 Sooty Shearwaters, and more have been seen from shore. I've been asked by a number of photographers about the Shearwater Journeys' trip this Friday, July 31. Spaces are available. Seems like this could be a good opportunity to photograph these masses of seabirds, although video might be best. Such a large migrating flock of Sabine's Gulls is very rarely recorded, although I once saw 3000+ at the Cordell Bank, Bodega Bay.
    
    See the most recent Point Pinos eBird report: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S24410856
    
    Leaders on the July 31 Monterey trip include: Steve Howell, Scott Terrill, Brian Sullivan, Nick Levendosky, Jennifer Green, David Pavlik, and Debi Shearwater.
    
    View the leader line up for all of our upcoming trips at:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2015/07/leading-at-sea-shearwater-journeys.html
    
    Shearwater Journeys' has some 26 pelagic trips on offer this fall season with departures from Monterey Bay, Half Moon Bay, Bodega Bay and Sausalito to the Farallon Islands. A few trips are sold out, but spaces are available on many others. The complete trip schedule is here:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/schedule.shtml
    
    There is only one Albacore trip, September 12, which departs from Monterey:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2015/07/about-albacore-offshore-monterey-trip.html
    
    Certainly looking like a very interesting year ? but, aren't they all ? one way or another! Help us kick off our 40th year of Monterey seabird trips this week!
    
    Shearwaters Forever,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 40 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
    
    
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  3. Red-footed Booby at Newport Pier 23 July LINK
    DATE: Jul 28, 2015 @ 5:22pm, 1 day(s) ago
    I received a message from Kimball Garrett earlier today that an immature Red-footed Booby was found on Newport Pier on 23 July. The bird was picked up by a rehabber, but died in captivity yesterday (26 July). This is the first record for Orange County, and the second occurrence this month of a bird in ill health found on the coast (the other in San Diego 5-6 July died a couple weeks later while in rehab).
    Tom Benson
    San Bernardino, CA
    
    
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  5. Half Moon Bay pelagic report - jul 26 LINK
    DATE: Jul 27, 2015 @ 6:52pm, 2 day(s) ago
    Hi all,
    We had a great day out from Half Moon Bay to San Mateo and San Francisco county waters today. The highlight for most was a Leatherback Sea Turtle just a few miles offshore from Half Moon Bay! Later on in the day another nice one was Laysan Albatross, seen in both counties. Good numbers of Black-footed Albatross throughout the day. Nice close Ashy Storm-Petrels, many Sabine’s Gulls, Pomarine Jaegers. Our first Buller’s Shearwaters of the season were out there today, several in with larger numbers of Sooty and Pink-footed shearwaters. In the alcid department a gleaming billed Tufted Puffin was a treat, and more frustrating was an unidentified murrelet Scripps’s/Craveri’s that dove and was never seen again, only a few folks on the boat saw this bird. A few Rhinos and Cassin’s auklets with lots of Common Murres; both pelagic species of phalarope were out there.
    It was a day with moderate winds, and good conditions although it got bumpy out beyond the continental shelf. The great part was that birds were moving throughout the day, there always seemed to be something to look at. We did not have real lulls in the activity while we were out there. Basking shark last week, and Leatherback Sea Turtle this week – not bad at all!
    Good birding and naturalizing,
    Alvaro
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
  6. -back to top-
  7. Monterey pelagic LINK
    DATE: Jul 26, 2015 @ 4:01pm, 3 day(s) ago
    We had a good day on today's Monterey Seabirds pelagic trip. We had thousands of sooty shearwaters and seabirds in view during the entire trip. Highlights were a Buller's Shearwater, two South Polar Skuas, one Scripp's Murrelet, a few pomarine jaegers and Sabine's Gulls put on a good show along with fulmars, black-footed albatross and pink-footed shearwaters.
    
    John Sterling.
    26 Palm Ave
    Woodland, CA 95696
    Www.sterlingbirds.com
    530 908-3836
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    
  8. -back to top-
  9. Re: [CALBIRDS] Heermann's Gull juveniles? Current warm water conditions. LINK
    DATE: Jul 26, 2015 @ 3:47pm, 3 day(s) ago
    I have seen none during any visit to LA County beaches and harbors, this year. I don't eBird every time I'm in the harbor, or at the beach, so my sample size is bigger than it appears.
    Tom Miko
    LA
    Claremont 91711
    
    Thomas Geza Miko
    http://www.tgmiko.com/
    Claremont, Los Angeles County, California
    909.241.3300
    
    On Sat, Jul 25, 2015 at 8:03 AM, Don Roberson creagrus@... [CALBIRDS] <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:Alvaro asks:
    
    > I am wondering if anyone is seeing juvenile Heermann?s Gulls this year? There have been none in Half Moon Bay thus far, and we are seeing 400-800 on the beach daily.
    
    Well, yes. Last time I checked (7 July) there were 21 very fresh juvenal-plumaged Heermann's Gulls, just starting to fly, at the rooftop nesting colony in Seaside, Monterey County, where they have successfully bred the last several years.
    
    But I haven't yet seen any migrant juvs from the south -- and I suspect that was your question. The Monterey County breeding colony, which has existed most years since 2000 -- but has moved location a small distance -- remains completely unknown to most observers.
    
    Don Roberson
    
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  10. -back to top-
  11. ash-throated flycatcher LINK
    DATE: Jul 25, 2015 @ 10:49pm, 4 day(s) ago
    Thanks to the dozen or so people from all around the state
    who unanimously told me my mystery bird posted yesterday was an ash-throated
    flycatcher. That is a first sighting of that species for me and my wife. It’s
    the first time I’ve posted a message in this group and I am very
    gratified to know there is so much help available.
    
    Charlie Klein
    Oakland
    
    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/CALBIRDS/photos/albums/767373666/lightbox/427738553?orderBy=ordinal&sortOrder=asc&photoFilter=ALL#zax/427738553
    
  12. -back to top-
  13. Re: [CALBIRDS] Heermann's Gull juveniles? Current warm water conditions. LINK
    DATE: Jul 25, 2015 @ 12:48pm, 4 day(s) ago
    ?I was in SoCal recently and spent some time at Dana Point Harbor, and now that you mention it, that's normally a good spot to find Heerman's in the gull groups and I saw very few and those that I saw were mostly first cycle with maybe a few 2nd cycle. Almost none in adult plumage. I wasn't there long and not specifically looking for this, but in retrospect it seems odd to other summer visits. 
    
    I've seen some vague reports of problems with the brown pelican nesting again this year as well (but don't have a pointer handy or details), so if that's true, it wouldn't surprise me that the gulls were impacted, and probably the mexican tern nest areas as well... 
    ?
    On Fri, Jul 24, 2015 at 9:25 PM, 'Alvaro Jaramillo' chucao@... [CALBIRDS] <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:I am wondering if anyone is seeing juvenile Heermann?s Gulls this year? There have been none in Half Moon Bay thus far, and we are seeing 400-800 on the beach daily. Last year there were almost no young raised, a complete breeding failure due to low food from warm water off Baja. So I am wondering if they will have a second bad year, or what?
    
    --
    Chuq Von Rospach - Stories Told Herehttp://www.chuqui.com
    chuqvr@...
    @chuq
    Silcon Valley, California
    
    
  14. -back to top-
  15. mystery birds LINK
    DATE: Jul 25, 2015 @ 10:48am, 4 day(s) ago
    Hi:
    
    Does anyone know what this is, seen at Valle Vista Staging
    Area, Moraga
    (Bay Area) yesterday? About 9 or 10 inches, I would guess. Conditions not good,
    obviously.
    
    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/CALBIRDS/photos/albums/767373666/lightbox/427738553?orderBy=ordinal&sortOrder=asc&photoFilter=ALL#zax/427738553
    
    Thanks,
    Charlie Klein
    Oakland
  16. -back to top-
  17. RE: [CALBIRDS] Heermann's Gull juveniles? Current warm water conditions. LINK
    DATE: Jul 25, 2015 @ 9:19am, 4 day(s) ago
    Don
    I ignored the CA breeders in my question, since they are a tiny number.
    Last year there were some juveniles found in Monterey, but it never was
    clear if they were local or not? Still it was a miniscule number, so
    essentially there were none.
    Thanks
    Alvaro
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    
  18. -back to top-
  19. Re: [CALBIRDS] Heermann's Gull juveniles? Current warm water conditions. LINK
    DATE: Jul 25, 2015 @ 8:03am, 4 day(s) ago
    Alvaro asks:
    > I am wondering if anyone is seeing juvenile Heermann?s Gulls this year? There have been none in Half Moon Bay thus far, and we are seeing 400-800 on the beach daily.
    
    Well, yes. Last time I checked (7 July) there were 21 very fresh juvenal-plumaged Heermann's Gulls, just starting to fly, at the rooftop nesting colony in Seaside, Monterey County, where they have successfully bred the last several years.
    
    But I haven't yet seen any migrant juvs from the south -- and I suspect that was your question. The Monterey County breeding colony, which has existed most years since 2000 -- but has moved location a small distance -- remains completely unknown to most observers.
    
    Don Roberson
    
    
  20. -back to top-
  21. Heermann's Gull juveniles? Current warm water conditions. LINK
    DATE: Jul 25, 2015 @ 9:25pm, 4 day(s) ago
    Hi all,
       I am wondering if anyone is seeing juvenile Heermann’s Gulls this year? There have been none in Half Moon Bay thus far, and we are seeing 400-800 on the beach daily. Last year there were almost no young raised, a complete breeding failure due to low food from warm water off Baja. So I am wondering if they will have a second bad year, or what? I have tried to contact the biologists on Isla Rasa, Baja but have not heard anything from down there. Juveniles should be brown (not dark blackish grey), they look scaly above (pale fringes) and have a dull pinkish-orange bill base. Let me know if they are showing up in the south.
       The ocean is warm, El Niño is strengthening and we have particularly warm water offshore in CA.  For a picture of the anomaly (difference from the mean), have a look at this map from today. Red is hotter than usual.
    http://polar.ncep.noaa.gov/sst/rtg_low_res/namer_anomaly_oper0.png
    good birding,
    Alvaro
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
  22. -back to top-
  23. n. CA cruise-ship pelagic highlights, Jul 12 & 20 LINK
    DATE: Jul 22, 2015 @ 6:56am, 8 day(s) ago
    Oregon birders J. Gilligan and O. Schmidt took the July 11th sailing of
    the 10-day round-trip San Francisco to se. Alaska Princess cruise that
    is run all summer long and which is excellent for a variety of pelagic
    species. Their strong emphasis is always Oregon waters, so their
    birding in n. CA waters was somewhat low-key and incomplete. But despite
    that, they still saw a single HAWAIIAN PETREL off Humboldt Co. on July
    12th and a single COOK'S PETREL there on July 20th. Also numbers of Ashy
    Storm-Petrels off Humboldt and Del Norte. They also had excellent
    totals of both HAWAIIAN (6) and COOK'S (5) Petrels off s. Oregon on the
    12th. Good to excellent numbers of pelagics off both OR and WA,
    including a few Flesh-footed Shearwaters, a good count of South
    Polar Skuas, and a single Ashy Storm-Petrel in OR waters, where casual.
    
    B. Rideout and I will be taking this same cruise soon as well, departing
    July 31st--my personal 8th time taking this trip in the past three years.
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  24. -back to top-
  25. Re: [CALBIRDS] penguins LINK
    DATE: Jul 20, 2015 @ 9:44am, 9 day(s) ago
    I've wondered the same about penguins often
    photographed standing on icebergs with tall
    vertical sides. They can, however, pop well out
    of the water in order to get onto bergs and
    shorelines, with inherent buoyancy and swimming
    velocity as primary forces. Why not onto a boat
    as well, presuming the sides weren't too high?
    
    Has anyone quantified how high out of the water
    any particular penguin species can "fly"?
    
    Chuck Almdale
    North Hills, Ca.
    
    At 09:30 AM 7/18/2015, 'Ken Burton' shrikethree@... [CALBIRDS] wrote: >I’m having trouble figuring out how a
    >ship-assisted penguin might get onto the ship in
    >the first place. I just can’t see one walking
    >up the gangplank unnoticed or unobstructed.
    >
    >Ken Burton
    >Arcata
    
    
  26. -back to top-
  27. Re: [CALBIRDS] penguins LINK
    DATE: Jul 19, 2015 @ 6:38pm, 10 day(s) ago
    I definitely would argue that a bird placed on a ship by people is NOT
    COUNTABLE, no matter how many opportunities it had to get off!
    
    Ken Burton
    Arcata
    
    From: Alvaro Jaramillo
    Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2015 6:27 PM
    To: 'Ken Burton' ; 'CALBIRDS'
    Subject: RE: [CALBIRDS] penguins
    
    Ken,
    
    The idea is that they are caught by crew and then taken as pets. Apparently this
    used to go on back in the day (20-40s when RC Murphy wrote about the Humboldt
    Current), but it is unlikely now.
    
    Alvaro
    Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From:
    CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
    'Ken Burton' shrikethree@... [CALBIRDS]Sent: Saturday, July
    18, 2015 9:30 AMTo: 'CALBIRDS'
    <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS]
    penguins
    
    I?m having trouble
    figuring out how a ship-assisted penguin might get onto the ship in the first
    place. I just can?t see one walking up the gangplank unnoticed or
    unobstructed.
    
    Ken
    Burton
    
    Arcata
    
    From: mailto:CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com
    
    Sent:
    Saturday, July 18, 2015 9:18 AM
    
    To: 'Paul
    Lehman' ; 'CALBIRDS'
    
    Subject:
    [CALBIRDS] penguins
    
    Paul,
    
    I would argue that penguins actually have a reasonable chance of arriving here
    as vagrants. They have a large and really good track record of vagrancy in the
    southern hemisphere. Being non flying birds, and some being highly migratory,
    they are not as constrained as albatrosses perhaps which have to contend with
    the doldrums. Sure, there is the physiological hurdle of warm water near the
    tropics, but on the American West Coast the latitude where one finds warm water
    is actually not insurmountable for a penguin. The issue is that they can carry a
    lot of fat to live off, more so than a flying bird, since they don?t need to
    fly! I am not making an argument that ship assistance doesn?t happen in
    penguins, but I think one can make a pretty reasonable argument that penguin
    vagrancy to the northern hemisphere can occur. The most likely place for it
    given the cold water currents, is the Pacific Coast of the Americas. The two
    most likely species are the Humboldt and Magellanic penguins. Hey if a Walrus
    can end up in central Saskatchewan, a penguin can end up in California.
    
    There is a June 2007 record of Magellanic Penguin from El Salvador. Distressed
    and found on the beach I gather, it was a first year old as might be expected
    for a vagrant as well. I think this record might indeed be valid as a vagrant
    bird, and that is not all that far as the penguin swims.
    Regards
    Alvaro
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com]
    On Behalf Of Paul Lehman lehman.paul1@...
    [CALBIRDS]Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2015 5:15 AMTo:
    CALBIRDS <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>Subject:
    [CALBIRDS] on booby and whistling-duck origins
    
    I was out of the country
    when both the ea. L.A. County Black-bellied Whistling-Duck and the San Diego
    Red-footed Booby showed up earlier this month, alas. But here are a few
    slightly tardy origin-issue thoughts that might be of interest, or
    not.BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK: Kimball covered well much of what
    needed to be mentioned back when the bird showed up. I'd add only that in
    support of the bird being a wild vagrant (in addition to its brief stay
    and reasonable time of year for a stray based on the timing of a bunch
    of the older CA records) there were two different sightings of multiple
    birds in Yuma County in sw AZ recently as well, one of which was of a
    small flock of 4 birds seen about 35 miles east of Yuma the exact same
    day the L.A. Co. bird turned up. But, although there was a well-known
    major increase in the numbers of this species in se. and cen. AZ
    starting back by the 1970s and continuing in to perhaps the 1990s, the
    species then subsequently declined in se. AZ, leaving the greater
    Phoenix area as the actual center of abundance in that state--but then
    even those numbers have dropped during the past decade or so, the likely
    result of urbanization swallowing up irrigated farm land. No matter,
    contemplating the origin of all out-of-range whistling-ducks needs to be
    strongly considered, given their relative abundance in
    captivity.RED-FOOTED BOOBY: This bird, in poor condition hanging around
    the docks where the largest fleet of sportfishing boats in San Diego is
    docked, was clearly a ship-assist. OK, maybe a 99.95 % ship assist. But
    that's where the near certainty ends and the guessing starts. Did it come on
    board such a boat just a couple miles off Point Loma and make the short
    ride in? Or did it join up with one of the good number of long-range
    boats docked there, which go on multi-day fishing trips to off central
    and even southern Baja? Does how long and far it rode the ship matter?
    Without a crew report, that's pretty much an unknowable. And, again,
    does it matter at all? The other, very important question is: was the
    bird captured or otherwise restrained in any way during any of its ride
    back in to port? If yes, then the bird is uncountable, according to just
    about every checklist committee around. But that is also an unknowable,
    given the lack of a traceable ship and crew who could state what may have
    happened en route. Many folks believe that all likely ship-assists are
    countable unless proven restrained, while some others do not believe any
    such birds should be counted. Should a penguin from the Southern Hemisphere
    that rides a ship up to off California or even Alaska (which has likely
    occurred on several occasions) count, as without the ship the bird likely
    never would have come close to getting here alive? And what about passerines
    riding on board ships for LONG distances? Some U.K. birders, upon hearing
    news of a number of North American passerines riding ships across the
    Atlantic and about to arrive in port, have gone to said ports in hopes of
    seeing those birds departing the boat as it docks--though I gather never
    with success! But boobies are perfectly happy to regularly ride ships, and
    boobies on boats have become a regular component of their natural history
    now for several centuries. Anyway, without 'proof' that this San Diego bird
    was restrained, I suppose most folks who saw it will count it, as I would
    have done if I had been around to see it, though it would have been with
    a modicum of trepidation and pangs of uneasiness in my gut. The previous
    Red-footed Booby to arrive on a fishing boat at the same sport-fishing
    harbor was aboard "Grande" about 6 or 7 years ago and the crew was able
    to state that the bird categorically was never trapped or restrained in
    any way, but it had rode the boat in from a good ways down off Baja; and
    the CBRC narrowly rejected that bird anyway on the basis of ship-assist
    (I would have disagreed with that vote given the proven lack of forced
    restraint), so who knows what the vote might be on this recent San Diego
    bird, although committee membership has changed a fair amount since the
    earlier vote.--Paul Lehman, San
    Diego
    
    This
    email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. www.avast.com
    
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  28. -back to top-
  29. RE: [CALBIRDS] penguins LINK
    DATE: Jul 19, 2015 @ 6:27pm, 10 day(s) ago
    Ken,
       The idea is that they are caught by crew and then taken as pets. Apparently this used to go on back in the day (20-40s when RC Murphy wrote about the Humboldt Current), but it is unlikely now.
    
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 'Ken Burton' shrikethree@... [CALBIRDS]Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2015 9:30 AMTo: 'CALBIRDS' <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] penguins
    
    I?m having trouble figuring out how a ship-assisted penguin might get onto the ship in the first place. I just can?t see one walking up the gangplank unnoticed or unobstructed.
    
    Ken Burton
    
    Arcata
    
    From: mailto:CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com
    
    Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2015 9:18 AM
    
    To: 'Paul Lehman' ; 'CALBIRDS'
    
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] penguins
    
    Paul,
    I would argue that penguins actually have a reasonable chance of arriving here as vagrants. They have a large and really good track record of vagrancy in the southern hemisphere. Being non flying birds, and some being highly migratory, they are not as constrained as albatrosses perhaps which have to contend with the doldrums. Sure, there is the physiological hurdle of warm water near the tropics, but on the American West Coast the latitude where one finds warm water is actually not insurmountable for a penguin. The issue is that they can carry a lot of fat to live off, more so than a flying bird, since they don?t need to fly! I am not making an argument that ship assistance doesn?t happen in penguins, but I think one can make a pretty reasonable argument that penguin vagrancy to the northern hemisphere can occur. The most likely place for it given the cold water currents, is the Pacific Coast of the Americas. The two most likely species are the Humboldt and Magellanic penguins. Hey if a Walrus can end up in central Saskatchewan, a penguin can end up in California.
    There is a June 2007 record of Magellanic Penguin from El Salvador. Distressed and found on the beach I gather, it was a first year old as might be expected for a vagrant as well. I think this record might indeed be valid as a vagrant bird, and that is not all that far as the penguin swims.
    Regards
    Alvaro
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul Lehman lehman.paul1@... [CALBIRDS]Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2015 5:15 AMTo: CALBIRDS <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>Subject: [CALBIRDS] on booby and whistling-duck origins
    
    I was out of the country when both the ea. L.A. County Black-bellied Whistling-Duck and the San Diego Red-footed Booby showed up earlier this month, alas. But here are a few slightly tardy origin-issue thoughts that might be of interest, or not.BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK: Kimball covered well much of what needed to be mentioned back when the bird showed up. I'd add only that in support of the bird being a wild vagrant (in addition to its brief stay and reasonable time of year for a stray based on the timing of a bunch of the older CA records) there were two different sightings of multiple birds in Yuma County in sw AZ recently as well, one of which was of a small flock of 4 birds seen about 35 miles east of Yuma the exact same day the L.A. Co. bird turned up. But, although there was a well-known major increase in the numbers of this species in se. and cen. AZ starting back by the 1970s and continuing in to perhaps the 1990s, the species then subsequently declined in se. AZ, leaving the greater Phoenix area as the actual center of abundance in that state--but then even those numbers have dropped during the past decade or so, the likely result of urbanization swallowing up irrigated farm land. No matter, contemplating the origin of all out-of-range whistling-ducks needs to be strongly considered, given their relative abundance in captivity.RED-FOOTED BOOBY: This bird, in poor condition hanging around the docks where the largest fleet of sportfishing boats in San Diego is docked, was clearly a ship-assist. OK, maybe a 99.95 % ship assist. But that's where the near certainty ends and the guessing starts. Did it come on board such a boat just a couple miles off Point Loma and make the short ride in? Or did it join up with one of the good number of long-range boats docked there, which go on multi-day fishing trips to off central and even southern Baja? Does how long and far it rode the ship matter? Without a crew report, that's pretty much an unknowable. And, again, does it matter at all? The other, very important question is: was the bird captured or otherwise restrained in any way during any of its ride back in to port? If yes, then the bird is uncountable, according to just about every checklist committee around. But that is also an unknowable, given the lack of a traceable ship and crew who could state what may have happened en route. Many folks believe that all likely ship-assists are countable unless proven restrained, while some others do not believe any such birds should be counted. Should a penguin from the Southern Hemisphere that rides a ship up to off California or even Alaska (which has likely occurred on several occasions) count, as without the ship the bird likely never would have come close to getting here alive? And what about passerines riding on board ships for LONG distances? Some U.K. birders, upon hearing news of a number of North American passerines riding ships across the Atlantic and about to arrive in port, have gone to said ports in hopes of seeing those birds departing the boat as it docks--though I gather never with success! But boobies are perfectly happy to regularly ride ships, and boobies on boats have become a regular component of their natural history now for several centuries. Anyway, without 'proof' that this San Diego bird was restrained, I suppose most folks who saw it will count it, as I would have done if I had been around to see it, though it would have been with a modicum of trepidation and pangs of uneasiness in my gut. The previous Red-footed Booby to arrive on a fishing boat at the same sport-fishing harbor was aboard "Grande" about 6 or 7 years ago and the crew was able to state that the bird categorically was never trapped or restrained in any way, but it had rode the boat in from a good ways down off Baja; and the CBRC narrowly rejected that bird anyway on the basis of ship-assist (I would have disagreed with that vote given the proven lack of forced restraint), so who knows what the vote might be on this recent San Diego bird, although committee membership has changed a fair amount since the earlier vote.--Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
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  30. -back to top-
  31. RE: [CALBIRDS] penguins LINK
    DATE: Jul 19, 2015 @ 6:25pm, 10 day(s) ago
    Hi Chet,
       I just checked Wiedenfeld?s Galapagos checklist and there are no penguin records there other than Galapagos Penguin. No wake surfing behavior in penguins. They ignore or dive when they see boats.
    Alvaro
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Chet Ogan chet_ogan@... [CALBIRDS]Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2015 5:57 PMTo: Ken Burton <shrikethree@...>; 'CALBIRDS' <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] penguins
    
    I seem to also recall hearing about Magellanic Penguins being seen near the Galapagos, not mistaken for Galapagos Penguins. Can penguins wake surf like dolphins?
    
    Chet Ogan Eureka, CA
    
    On Saturday, July 18, 2015 5:39 PM, "'Ken Burton' shrikethree@... [CALBIRDS]" <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
    
    I?m having trouble figuring out how a ship-assisted penguin might get onto the ship in the first place. I just can?t see one walking up the gangplank unnoticed or unobstructed.
    
    Ken Burton
    
    Arcata
    
    From: mailto:CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com
    
    Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2015 9:18 AM
    
    To: 'Paul Lehman' ; 'CALBIRDS'
    
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] penguins
    
    Paul,
    
    I would argue that penguins actually have a reasonable chance of arriving here as vagrants. They have a large and really good track record of vagrancy in the southern hemisphere. Being non flying birds, and some being highly migratory, they are not as constrained as albatrosses perhaps which have to contend with the doldrums. Sure, there is the physiological hurdle of warm water near the tropics, but on the American West Coast the latitude where one finds warm water is actually not insurmountable for a penguin. The issue is that they can carry a lot of fat to live off, more so than a flying bird, since they don?t need to fly! I am not making an argument that ship assistance doesn?t happen in penguins, but I think one can make a pretty reasonable argument that penguin vagrancy to the northern hemisphere can occur. The most likely place for it given the cold water currents, is the Pacific Coast of the Americas. The two most likely species are the Humboldt and Magellanic penguins. Hey if a Walrus can end up in central Saskatchewan, a penguin can end up in California.
    
    There is a June 2007 record of Magellanic Penguin from El Salvador. Distressed and found on the beach I gather, it was a first year old as might be expected for a vagrant as well. I think this record might indeed be valid as a vagrant bird, and that is not all that far as the penguin swims.
    
    Regards
    
    Alvaro
    
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    
    alvaro@...
    
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul Lehman lehman.paul1@... [CALBIRDS]Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2015 5:15 AMTo: CALBIRDS <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>Subject: [CALBIRDS] on booby and whistling-duck origins
    
    I was out of the country when both the ea. L.A. County Black-bellied Whistling-Duck and the San Diego Red-footed Booby showed up earlier this month, alas. But here are a few slightly tardy origin-issue thoughts that might be of interest, or not.BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK: Kimball covered well much of what needed to be mentioned back when the bird showed up. I'd add only that in support of the bird being a wild vagrant (in addition to its brief stay and reasonable time of year for a stray based on the timing of a bunch of the older CA records) there were two different sightings of multiple birds in Yuma County in sw AZ recently as well, one of which was of a small flock of 4 birds seen about 35 miles east of Yuma the exact same day the L.A. Co. bird turned up. But, although there was a well-known major increase in the numbers of this species in se. and cen. AZ starting back by the 1970s and continuing in to perhaps the 1990s, the species then subsequently declined in se. AZ, leaving the greater Phoenix area as the actual center of abundance in that state--but then even those numbers have dropped during the past decade or so, the likely result of urbanization swallowing up irrigated farm land. No matter, contemplating the origin of all out-of-range whistling-ducks needs to be strongly considered, given their relative abundance in captivity.RED-FOOTED BOOBY: This bird, in poor condition hanging around the docks where the largest fleet of sportfishing boats in San Diego is docked, was clearly a ship-assist. OK, maybe a 99.95 % ship assist. But that's where the near certainty ends and the guessing starts. Did it come on board such a boat just a couple miles off Point Loma and make the short ride in? Or did it join up with one of the good number of long-range boats docked there, which go on multi-day fishing trips to off central and even southern Baja? Does how long and far it rode the ship matter? Without a crew report, that's pretty much an unknowable. And, again, does it matter at all? The other, very important question is: was the bird captured or otherwise restrained in any way during any of its ride back in to port? If yes, then the bird is uncountable, according to just about every checklist committee around. But that is also an unknowable, given the lack of a traceable ship and crew who could state what may have happened en route. Many folks believe that all likely ship-assists are countable unless proven restrained, while some others do not believe any such birds should be counted. Should a penguin from the Southern Hemisphere that rides a ship up to off California or even Alaska (which has likely occurred on several occasions) count, as without the ship the bird likely never would have come close to getting here alive? And what about passerines riding on board ships for LONG distances? Some U.K. birders, upon hearing news of a number of North American passerines riding ships across the Atlantic and about to arrive in port, have gone to said ports in hopes of seeing those birds departing the boat as it docks--though I gather never with success! But boobies are perfectly happy to regularly ride ships, and boobies on boats have become a regular component of their natural history now for several centuries. Anyway, without 'proof' that this San Diego bird was restrained, I suppose most folks who saw it will count it, as I would have done if I had been around to see it, though it would have been with a modicum of trepidation and pangs of uneasiness in my gut. The previous Red-footed Booby to arrive on a fishing boat at the same sport-fishing harbor was aboard "Grande" about 6 or 7 years ago and the crew was able to state that the bird categorically was never trapped or restrained in any way, but it had rode the boat in from a good ways down off Baja; and the CBRC narrowly rejected that bird anyway on the basis of ship-assist (I would have disagreed with that vote given the proven lack of forced restraint), so who knows what the vote might be on this recent San Diego bird, although committee membership has changed a fair amount since the earlier vote.--Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
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  32. -back to top-
  33. Re: [CALBIRDS] penguins LINK
    DATE: Jul 19, 2015 @ 5:56pm, 10 day(s) ago
    I seem to also recall hearing about Magellanic Penguins being seen near the Galapagos, not mistaken for Galapagos Penguins. Can penguins wake surf like dolphins?
    
    Chet Ogan
    Eureka, CA
    
    On Saturday, July 18, 2015 5:39 PM, "'Ken Burton' shrikethree@... [CALBIRDS]" <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
    
    I?m having trouble figuring out how a ship-assisted penguin might get onto
    the ship in the first place. I just can?t see one walking up the gangplank
    unnoticed or unobstructed.
    
    Ken Burton
    Arcata
    
    From: mailto:CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2015 9:18 AM
    To: 'Paul Lehman' ; 'CALBIRDS'
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] penguins
    
    Paul,
    
    I would argue that penguins actually have a reasonable chance of arriving here
    as vagrants. They have a large and really good track record of vagrancy in the
    southern hemisphere. Being non flying birds, and some being highly migratory,
    they are not as constrained as albatrosses perhaps which have to contend with
    the doldrums. Sure, there is the physiological hurdle of warm water near the
    tropics, but on the American West Coast the latitude where one finds warm water
    is actually not insurmountable for a penguin. The issue is that they can carry a
    lot of fat to live off, more so than a flying bird, since they don?t need to
    fly! I am not making an argument that ship assistance doesn?t happen in
    penguins, but I think one can make a pretty reasonable argument that penguin
    vagrancy to the northern hemisphere can occur. The most likely place for it
    given the cold water currents, is the Pacific Coast of the Americas. The two
    most likely species are the Humboldt and Magellanic penguins. Hey if a Walrus
    can end up in central Saskatchewan, a penguin can end up in California.
    
    There is a June 2007 record of Magellanic Penguin from El Salvador. Distressed
    and found on the beach I gather, it was a first year old as might be expected
    for a vagrant as well. I think this record might indeed be valid as a vagrant
    bird, and that is not all that far as the penguin swims.
    
    Regards
    Alvaro
    Alvaro
    Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From:
    CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
    Paul Lehman lehman.paul1@... [CALBIRDS]Sent: Saturday,
    July 18, 2015 5:15 AMTo: CALBIRDS
    <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>Subject: [CALBIRDS] on booby and
    whistling-duck origins
    
    I was out of the country when both the ea. L.A.
    County Black-bellied Whistling-Duck and the San Diego Red-footed Booby
    showed up earlier this month, alas. But here are a few slightly tardy
    origin-issue thoughts that might be of interest, or
    not.BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK: Kimball covered well much of what
    needed to be mentioned back when the bird showed up. I'd add only that in
    support of the bird being a wild vagrant (in addition to its brief stay
    and reasonable time of year for a stray based on the timing of a bunch
    of the older CA records) there were two different sightings of multiple
    birds in Yuma County in sw AZ recently as well, one of which was of a
    small flock of 4 birds seen about 35 miles east of Yuma the exact same
    day the L.A. Co. bird turned up. But, although there was a well-known
    major increase in the numbers of this species in se. and cen. AZ
    starting back by the 1970s and continuing in to perhaps the 1990s, the
    species then subsequently declined in se. AZ, leaving the greater
    Phoenix area as the actual center of abundance in that state--but then
    even those numbers have dropped during the past decade or so, the likely
    result of urbanization swallowing up irrigated farm land. No matter,
    contemplating the origin of all out-of-range whistling-ducks needs to be
    strongly considered, given their relative abundance in
    captivity.RED-FOOTED BOOBY: This bird, in poor condition hanging around
    the docks where the largest fleet of sportfishing boats in San Diego is
    docked, was clearly a ship-assist. OK, maybe a 99.95 % ship assist. But
    that's where the near certainty ends and the guessing starts. Did it come on
    board such a boat just a couple miles off Point Loma and make the short
    ride in? Or did it join up with one of the good number of long-range
    boats docked there, which go on multi-day fishing trips to off central
    and even southern Baja? Does how long and far it rode the ship matter?
    Without a crew report, that's pretty much an unknowable. And, again,
    does it matter at all? The other, very important question is: was the
    bird captured or otherwise restrained in any way during any of its ride
    back in to port? If yes, then the bird is uncountable, according to just
    about every checklist committee around. But that is also an unknowable,
    given the lack of a traceable ship and crew who could state what may have
    happened en route. Many folks believe that all likely ship-assists are
    countable unless proven restrained, while some others do not believe any
    such birds should be counted. Should a penguin from the Southern Hemisphere
    that rides a ship up to off California or even Alaska (which has likely
    occurred on several occasions) count, as without the ship the bird likely
    never would have come close to getting here alive? And what about passerines
    riding on board ships for LONG distances? Some U.K. birders, upon hearing
    news of a number of North American passerines riding ships across the
    Atlantic and about to arrive in port, have gone to said ports in hopes of
    seeing those birds departing the boat as it docks--though I gather never
    with success! But boobies are perfectly happy to regularly ride ships, and
    boobies on boats have become a regular component of their natural history
    now for several centuries. Anyway, without 'proof' that this San Diego bird
    was restrained, I suppose most folks who saw it will count it, as I would
    have done if I had been around to see it, though it would have been with
    a modicum of trepidation and pangs of uneasiness in my gut. The previous
    Red-footed Booby to arrive on a fishing boat at the same sport-fishing
    harbor was aboard "Grande" about 6 or 7 years ago and the crew was able
    to state that the bird categorically was never trapped or restrained in
    any way, but it had rode the boat in from a good ways down off Baja; and
    the CBRC narrowly rejected that bird anyway on the basis of ship-assist
    (I would have disagreed with that vote given the proven lack of forced
    restraint), so who knows what the vote might be on this recent San Diego
    bird, although committee membership has changed a fair amount since the
    earlier vote.--Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
    www.avast.com
    
    
  34. -back to top-
  35. Re: [CALBIRDS] penguins LINK
    DATE: Jul 19, 2015 @ 9:30am, 10 day(s) ago
    I?m having trouble figuring out how a ship-assisted penguin might get onto
    the ship in the first place. I just can?t see one walking up the gangplank
    unnoticed or unobstructed.
    
    Ken Burton
    Arcata
    
    From: mailto:CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2015 9:18 AM
    To: 'Paul Lehman' ; 'CALBIRDS'
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] penguins
    
    Paul,
    
    I would argue that penguins actually have a reasonable chance of arriving here
    as vagrants. They have a large and really good track record of vagrancy in the
    southern hemisphere. Being non flying birds, and some being highly migratory,
    they are not as constrained as albatrosses perhaps which have to contend with
    the doldrums. Sure, there is the physiological hurdle of warm water near the
    tropics, but on the American West Coast the latitude where one finds warm water
    is actually not insurmountable for a penguin. The issue is that they can carry a
    lot of fat to live off, more so than a flying bird, since they don?t need to
    fly! I am not making an argument that ship assistance doesn?t happen in
    penguins, but I think one can make a pretty reasonable argument that penguin
    vagrancy to the northern hemisphere can occur. The most likely place for it
    given the cold water currents, is the Pacific Coast of the Americas. The two
    most likely species are the Humboldt and Magellanic penguins. Hey if a Walrus
    can end up in central Saskatchewan, a penguin can end up in California.
    
    There is a June 2007 record of Magellanic Penguin from El Salvador. Distressed
    and found on the beach I gather, it was a first year old as might be expected
    for a vagrant as well. I think this record might indeed be valid as a vagrant
    bird, and that is not all that far as the penguin swims.
    
    Regards
    Alvaro
    Alvaro
    Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From:
    CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
    Paul Lehman lehman.paul1@... [CALBIRDS]Sent: Saturday,
    July 18, 2015 5:15 AMTo: CALBIRDS
    <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>Subject: [CALBIRDS] on booby and
    whistling-duck origins
    
    I was out of the country when both the ea. L.A.
    County Black-bellied Whistling-Duck and the San Diego Red-footed Booby
    showed up earlier this month, alas. But here are a few slightly tardy
    origin-issue thoughts that might be of interest, or
    not.BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK: Kimball covered well much of what
    needed to be mentioned back when the bird showed up. I'd add only that in
    support of the bird being a wild vagrant (in addition to its brief stay
    and reasonable time of year for a stray based on the timing of a bunch
    of the older CA records) there were two different sightings of multiple
    birds in Yuma County in sw AZ recently as well, one of which was of a
    small flock of 4 birds seen about 35 miles east of Yuma the exact same
    day the L.A. Co. bird turned up. But, although there was a well-known
    major increase in the numbers of this species in se. and cen. AZ
    starting back by the 1970s and continuing in to perhaps the 1990s, the
    species then subsequently declined in se. AZ, leaving the greater
    Phoenix area as the actual center of abundance in that state--but then
    even those numbers have dropped during the past decade or so, the likely
    result of urbanization swallowing up irrigated farm land. No matter,
    contemplating the origin of all out-of-range whistling-ducks needs to be
    strongly considered, given their relative abundance in
    captivity.RED-FOOTED BOOBY: This bird, in poor condition hanging around
    the docks where the largest fleet of sportfishing boats in San Diego is
    docked, was clearly a ship-assist. OK, maybe a 99.95 % ship assist. But
    that's where the near certainty ends and the guessing starts. Did it come on
    board such a boat just a couple miles off Point Loma and make the short
    ride in? Or did it join up with one of the good number of long-range
    boats docked there, which go on multi-day fishing trips to off central
    and even southern Baja? Does how long and far it rode the ship matter?
    Without a crew report, that's pretty much an unknowable. And, again,
    does it matter at all? The other, very important question is: was the
    bird captured or otherwise restrained in any way during any of its ride
    back in to port? If yes, then the bird is uncountable, according to just
    about every checklist committee around. But that is also an unknowable,
    given the lack of a traceable ship and crew who could state what may have
    happened en route. Many folks believe that all likely ship-assists are
    countable unless proven restrained, while some others do not believe any
    such birds should be counted. Should a penguin from the Southern Hemisphere
    that rides a ship up to off California or even Alaska (which has likely
    occurred on several occasions) count, as without the ship the bird likely
    never would have come close to getting here alive? And what about passerines
    riding on board ships for LONG distances? Some U.K. birders, upon hearing
    news of a number of North American passerines riding ships across the
    Atlantic and about to arrive in port, have gone to said ports in hopes of
    seeing those birds departing the boat as it docks--though I gather never
    with success! But boobies are perfectly happy to regularly ride ships, and
    boobies on boats have become a regular component of their natural history
    now for several centuries. Anyway, without 'proof' that this San Diego bird
    was restrained, I suppose most folks who saw it will count it, as I would
    have done if I had been around to see it, though it would have been with
    a modicum of trepidation and pangs of uneasiness in my gut. The previous
    Red-footed Booby to arrive on a fishing boat at the same sport-fishing
    harbor was aboard "Grande" about 6 or 7 years ago and the crew was able
    to state that the bird categorically was never trapped or restrained in
    any way, but it had rode the boat in from a good ways down off Baja; and
    the CBRC narrowly rejected that bird anyway on the basis of ship-assist
    (I would have disagreed with that vote given the proven lack of forced
    restraint), so who knows what the vote might be on this recent San Diego
    bird, although committee membership has changed a fair amount since the
    earlier vote.--Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
    www.avast.com
    
    
  36. -back to top-
  37. penguins LINK
    DATE: Jul 18, 2015 @ 9:18am, 11 day(s) ago
    Paul,
       I would argue that penguins actually have a reasonable chance of arriving here as vagrants. They have a large and really good track record of vagrancy in the southern hemisphere. Being non flying birds, and some being highly migratory, they are not as constrained as albatrosses perhaps which have to contend with the doldrums. Sure, there is the physiological hurdle of warm water near the tropics, but on the American West Coast the latitude where one finds warm water is actually not insurmountable for a penguin. The issue is that they can carry a lot of fat to live off, more so than a flying bird, since they don?t need to fly! I am not making an argument that ship assistance doesn?t happen in penguins, but I think one can make a pretty reasonable argument that penguin vagrancy to the northern hemisphere can occur. The most likely place for it given the cold water currents, is the Pacific Coast of the Americas. The two most likely species are the Humboldt and Magellanic penguins. Hey if a Walrus can end up in central Saskatchewan, a penguin can end up in California.
        There is a June 2007 record of Magellanic Penguin from El Salvador. Distressed and found on the beach I gather, it was a first year old as might be expected for a vagrant as well. I think this record might indeed be valid as a vagrant bird, and that is not all that far as the penguin swims.
    
    Regards
    Alvaro
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul Lehman lehman.paul1@... [CALBIRDS]Sent: Saturday, July 18, 2015 5:15 AMTo: CALBIRDS <CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com>Subject: [CALBIRDS] on booby and whistling-duck origins
    
    I was out of the country when both the ea. L.A. County Black-bellied Whistling-Duck and the San Diego Red-footed Booby showed up earlier this month, alas. But here are a few slightly tardy origin-issue thoughts that might be of interest, or not.BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK: Kimball covered well much of what needed to be mentioned back when the bird showed up. I'd add only that in support of the bird being a wild vagrant (in addition to its brief stay and reasonable time of year for a stray based on the timing of a bunch of the older CA records) there were two different sightings of multiple birds in Yuma County in sw AZ recently as well, one of which was of a small flock of 4 birds seen about 35 miles east of Yuma the exact same day the L.A. Co. bird turned up. But, although there was a well-known major increase in the numbers of this species in se. and cen. AZ starting back by the 1970s and continuing in to perhaps the 1990s, the species then subsequently declined in se. AZ, leaving the greater Phoenix area as the actual center of abundance in that state--but then even those numbers have dropped during the past decade or so, the likely result of urbanization swallowing up irrigated farm land. No matter, contemplating the origin of all out-of-range whistling-ducks needs to be strongly considered, given their relative abundance in captivity.RED-FOOTED BOOBY: This bird, in poor condition hanging around the docks where the largest fleet of sportfishing boats in San Diego is docked, was clearly a ship-assist. OK, maybe a 99.95 % ship assist. But that's where the near certainty ends and the guessing starts. Did it come on board such a boat just a couple miles off Point Loma and make the short ride in? Or did it join up with one of the good number of long-range boats docked there, which go on multi-day fishing trips to off central and even southern Baja? Does how long and far it rode the ship matter? Without a crew report, that's pretty much an unknowable. And, again, does it matter at all? The other, very important question is: was the bird captured or otherwise restrained in any way during any of its ride back in to port? If yes, then the bird is uncountable, according to just about every checklist committee around. But that is also an unknowable, given the lack of a traceable ship and crew who could state what may have happened en route. Many folks believe that all likely ship-assists are countable unless proven restrained, while some others do not believe any such birds should be counted. Should a penguin from the Southern Hemisphere that rides a ship up to off California or even Alaska (which has likely occurred on several occasions) count, as without the ship the bird likely never would have come close to getting here alive? And what about passerines riding on board ships for LONG distances? Some U.K. birders, upon hearing news of a number of North American passerines riding ships across the Atlantic and about to arrive in port, have gone to said ports in hopes of seeing those birds departing the boat as it docks--though I gather never with success! But boobies are perfectly happy to regularly ride ships, and boobies on boats have become a regular component of their natural history now for several centuries. Anyway, without 'proof' that this San Diego bird was restrained, I suppose most folks who saw it will count it, as I would have done if I had been around to see it, though it would have been with a modicum of trepidation and pangs of uneasiness in my gut. The previous Red-footed Booby to arrive on a fishing boat at the same sport-fishing harbor was aboard "Grande" about 6 or 7 years ago and the crew was able to state that the bird categorically was never trapped or restrained in any way, but it had rode the boat in from a good ways down off Baja; and the CBRC narrowly rejected that bird anyway on the basis of ship-assist (I would have disagreed with that vote given the proven lack of forced restraint), so who knows what the vote might be on this recent San Diego bird, although committee membership has changed a fair amount since the earlier vote.--Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  38. -back to top-
  39. on booby and whistling-duck origins LINK
    DATE: Jul 18, 2015 @ 5:15am, 12 day(s) ago
    I was out of the country when both the ea. L.A. County Black-bellied
    Whistling-Duck and the San Diego Red-footed Booby showed up earlier this
    month, alas. But here are a few slightly tardy origin-issue thoughts
    that might be of interest, or not.
    
    BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK: Kimball covered well much of what needed
    to be mentioned back when the bird showed up. I'd add only that in
    support of the bird being a wild vagrant (in addition to its brief stay
    and reasonable time of year for a stray based on the timing of a bunch
    of the older CA records) there were two different sightings of multiple
    birds in Yuma County in sw AZ recently as well, one of which was of a
    small flock of 4 birds seen about 35 miles east of Yuma the exact same
    day the L.A. Co. bird turned up. But, although there was a well-known
    major increase in the numbers of this species in se. and cen. AZ
    starting back by the 1970s and continuing in to perhaps the 1990s, the
    species then subsequently declined in se. AZ, leaving the greater
    Phoenix area as the actual center of abundance in that state--but then
    even those numbers have dropped during the past decade or so, the likely
    result of urbanization swallowing up irrigated farm land. No matter,
    contemplating the origin of all out-of-range whistling-ducks needs to be
    strongly considered, given their relative abundance in captivity.
    
    RED-FOOTED BOOBY: This bird, in poor condition hanging around the docks
    where the largest fleet of sportfishing boats in San Diego is docked,
    was clearly a ship-assist. OK, maybe a 99.95 % ship assist. But that's
    where the near certainty ends and the guessing starts. Did it come on
    board such a boat just a couple miles off Point Loma and make the short
    ride in? Or did it join up with one of the good number of long-range
    boats docked there, which go on multi-day fishing trips to off central
    and even southern Baja? Does how long and far it rode the ship matter?
    Without a crew report, that's pretty much an unknowable. And, again,
    does it matter at all? The other, very important question is: was the
    bird captured or otherwise restrained in any way during any of its ride
    back in to port? If yes, then the bird is uncountable, according to
    just about every checklist committee around. But that is also an
    unknowable, given the lack of a traceable ship and crew who could state
    what may have happened en route. Many folks believe that all likely
    ship-assists are countable unless proven restrained, while some others
    do not believe any such birds should be counted. Should a penguin from
    the Southern Hemisphere that rides a ship up to off California or even
    Alaska (which has likely occurred on several occasions) count, as
    without the ship the bird likely never would have come close to getting
    here alive? And what about passerines riding on board ships for LONG
    distances? Some U.K. birders, upon hearing news of a number of North
    American passerines riding ships across the Atlantic and about to arrive
    in port, have gone to said ports in hopes of seeing those birds
    departing the boat as it docks--though I gather never with success! But
    boobies are perfectly happy to regularly ride ships, and boobies on
    boats have become a regular component of their natural history now for
    several centuries. Anyway, without 'proof' that this San Diego bird was
    restrained, I suppose most folks who saw it will count it, as I would
    have done if I had been around to see it, though it would have been with
    a modicum of trepidation and pangs of uneasiness in my gut. The previous
    Red-footed Booby to arrive on a fishing boat at the same sport-fishing
    harbor was aboard "Grande" about 6 or 7 years ago and the crew was able
    to state that the bird categorically was never trapped or restrained in
    any way, but it had rode the boat in from a good ways down off Baja; and
    the CBRC narrowly rejected that bird anyway on the basis of ship-assist
    (I would have disagreed with that vote given the proven lack of forced
    restraint), so who knows what the vote might be on this recent San Diego
    bird, although committee membership has changed a fair amount since the
    earlier vote.
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  40. -back to top-
  41. Re: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Wedge-tailed Shearwater off La Jolla LINK
    DATE: Jul 17, 2015 @ 12:25pm, 12 day(s) ago
    Great bird.
    Yes, the one Gary and I saw 2 years ago stayed around at least for several hours. In fact, another observer reported to me seeing it 2 days later.
    Its pattern then was exactly like what you describe: closest shearwater to shore, making large loops around the inner Cove then heading south, disappearing for an hour or so then returning. So I think it is well worth continuing to look for this bird.
    But as you note, traffic and parking are beyond horrendous. And with a storm coming in from Hurricane Doreen as early as tomorrow, who knows if the bird will stick around or indeed if other southern birds might appear. Last year hurricanes pushed up or towards shore a couple of really intriguing birds. Certainly I intend to be out there for the next few mornings.
    Stan Walens
    San Diego
    On July 17, 2015, at 12:07 PM, "Paul Lehman lehman.paul1@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding]" <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
    > 
    >
    >On Friday the 17th, I did a seawatch at La Jolla starting soon after
    >dawn and which was highlighted by the appearance of an apparent
    >light-morph WEDGE-TAILED SHEARWATER for a couple minutes between
    >7:15-7:20AM. The bird appeared to come in and check out the B-v
    >Shearwater activity for a bit, making a few long, slow 'loops' around
    >off Pt La Jolla area, at one point being just about the closest
    >shearwater to shore all morning, and then changed course and headed
    >straight south and out of sight. I remained until 9:15AM. hoping it
    >might return, but no luck. Several hundred Black-venteds were present
    >all morning, as were just a small number of Sooties from time to time.
    >The Wedge-tailed immediately looked interesting when first spotted, with
    >a totally different flight style from the many rapid-flapping and
    >short-gliding Black-vents, but rather it lazily flew about, always low
    >to the water, mostly just gliding about on rather broad-based, slightly
    >arched and crooked, and somewhat pushed-forward wings, with a few
    >languid flaps interspersed from time to time, and with a longish but
    >skinny looking neck/head and longish tail extension behind the wings
    >which when the bird did bank, but still staying low to the water, on a
    >couple close occasions showed a wedge-shaped tip (although so do some
    >other shearwaters). It was more clean-cut dark and whitish below than a
    >typical Pink-foot, but certainly not as sharply marked as a Buller's or
    >Manx, with some duskiness on the lower face, dark undertail coverts
    >region, and with dark underwing margins and entire underside of
    >primaries and a small bit of duskiness on the underwing near the
    >axillars and carpal (but certainly less than a typical Pink-foot shows).
    >Clearly overall substantially larger than Black-vent and Sooty, but
    >appeared not as overall bulky as a Pink-foot would, though almost as
    >large in actual length and wingspan.
    >So, any chance this bird might reappear? Second-day boobies at La Jolla
    >have certainly occurred, but there isn't a very good track record of
    >second-day rare tubenoses there, or almost anywhere from shore. Though I
    >gather there was a few hours between sightings of the Wedge-tailed
    >Shearwater seen and photo'd a couple early-autumns ago also at La Jolla
    >by Nunn and Walens. If you want to give it a Hail Mary try over the
    >weekend, be sure to arrive VERY early in the AM to assure yourself a
    >parking spot and few traffic headaches. (I arrived at 6AM today, and it
    >was already somewhat busy with swimmers/divers/tourists.) By around 9AM
    >today the general seabird activity levels had dropped a bit, there was a
    >bit more glare, and the heat distortion was starting to pick up.
    >Other birds seen there this morning included a single MURRELET SP. which
    >came flying in and crashed head-first with a good splash in to the
    >water, typical of murrelets rather than auklets; but the bird was
    >certainly too far to see the fine detail needed to identify as Craveri's
    >vs. Scripps's vs. Guadalupe--though given date and location, Craveri's
    >or possibly Scripps's is the most likely. Also 5+ Black Storm-Petrels
    >present much of the morning, and a single Surf Scoter.
    >--Paul Lehman, San Diego
    >
    >
    >
    
    
  42. -back to top-
  43. Wedge-tailed Shearwater off La Jolla LINK
    DATE: Jul 17, 2015 @ 12:07pm, 12 day(s) ago
    On Friday the 17th, I did a seawatch at La Jolla starting soon after
    dawn and which was highlighted by the appearance of an apparent
    light-morph WEDGE-TAILED SHEARWATER for a couple minutes between
    7:15-7:20AM. The bird appeared to come in and check out the B-v
    Shearwater activity for a bit, making a few long, slow 'loops' around
    off Pt La Jolla area, at one point being just about the closest
    shearwater to shore all morning, and then changed course and headed
    straight south and out of sight. I remained until 9:15AM. hoping it
    might return, but no luck. Several hundred Black-venteds were present
    all morning, as were just a small number of Sooties from time to time.
    The Wedge-tailed immediately looked interesting when first spotted, with
    a totally different flight style from the many rapid-flapping and
    short-gliding Black-vents, but rather it lazily flew about, always low
    to the water, mostly just gliding about on rather broad-based, slightly
    arched and crooked, and somewhat pushed-forward wings, with a few
    languid flaps interspersed from time to time, and with a longish but
    skinny looking neck/head and longish tail extension behind the wings
    which when the bird did bank, but still staying low to the water, on a
    couple close occasions showed a wedge-shaped tip (although so do some
    other shearwaters). It was more clean-cut dark and whitish below than a
    typical Pink-foot, but certainly not as sharply marked as a Buller's or
    Manx, with some duskiness on the lower face, dark undertail coverts
    region, and with dark underwing margins and entire underside of
    primaries and a small bit of duskiness on the underwing near the
    axillars and carpal (but certainly less than a typical Pink-foot shows).
    Clearly overall substantially larger than Black-vent and Sooty, but
    appeared not as overall bulky as a Pink-foot would, though almost as
    large in actual length and wingspan.
    
    So, any chance this bird might reappear? Second-day boobies at La Jolla
    have certainly occurred, but there isn't a very good track record of
    second-day rare tubenoses there, or almost anywhere from shore. Though I
    gather there was a few hours between sightings of the Wedge-tailed
    Shearwater seen and photo'd a couple early-autumns ago also at La Jolla
    by Nunn and Walens. If you want to give it a Hail Mary try over the
    weekend, be sure to arrive VERY early in the AM to assure yourself a
    parking spot and few traffic headaches. (I arrived at 6AM today, and it
    was already somewhat busy with swimmers/divers/tourists.) By around 9AM
    today the general seabird activity levels had dropped a bit, there was a
    bit more glare, and the heat distortion was starting to pick up.
    
    Other birds seen there this morning included a single MURRELET SP. which
    came flying in and crashed head-first with a good splash in to the
    water, typical of murrelets rather than auklets; but the bird was
    certainly too far to see the fine detail needed to identify as Craveri's
    vs. Scripps's vs. Guadalupe--though given date and location, Craveri's
    or possibly Scripps's is the most likely. Also 5+ Black Storm-Petrels
    present much of the morning, and a single Surf Scoter.
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  44. -back to top-
  45. Not a European golden plover LINK
    DATE: Jul 14, 2015 @ 8:21am, 15 day(s) ago
    Tristan mentioned a possible European golden plover in arcata in his message earlier this morning despite the fact that several people wrote that they say the dusky underwings that eliminate that species from contention. A European would have bright white underwings.
    
    John Sterling.
    26 Palm Ave
    Woodland, CA 95696
    Www.sterlingbirds.com
    530 908-3836
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    
  46. -back to top-
  47. Chasing shorebirds in Arcata LINK
    DATE: Jul 14, 2015 @ 12:58am, 16 day(s) ago
    Calbirders,
    Some of you may want to chase this bird:https://www.flickr.com/photos/101791769@N08/sets/72157655858839355
    Also, there is a boldly-marked and intriguing golden-plover in first-alternate plumage at this location, which I have been seeing around the bay since June 27th. It has the general appearance of an American Golden-Plover, with white flaring toward the center of the breast and relatively short legs. However, it has a large bill; bold, bright gold in the upperparts; p10 is barely visible beyond p9; and it has a white vent and some white along the sides. Its wing coverts are trashed, its primaries fairly worn, and its longest tertial appears to be missing or growing, exaggerating the apparent primary projection. In many ways the bird resembles a European Golden-Plover, but there seems to be too much black intruding on the sides of the breast and too much white flaring above that. It may be our default Pacific, though the short legs and extent of white flaring into the breast would be odd, and the primary projection beyond the tail would be exceptional for that species. This may be a bird best left unidentified, although sometimes the Black-bellied flock visits the island in the bay just southeast of the Oxidation Ponds, which would provide much better views of the bird than we have currently obtained and might resolve some issues. There has also been a Pacific Golden-Plover in largely basic plumage in this area, as well as a dwindling flock of Wilson's Phalaropes in the Oxidation Ponds.
    The Oxidation Ponds Trail on South G Street is the only safe way to access this area. Walk past the ponds on your right, and the bay will be in front of you, with Jacoby Creek off to your left and one of the most spectacular shorebird gatherings in the state spreading out in various directions. The island in front and to your left generally gets packed with birds at high tide, although the flocks also sometimes shelter farther off in the pickleweed near Jacoby Creek. You have access to various levels of mud from this spot, so as the tide drops and rises, there will generally be shorebirds to look at somewhere, EXCEPT right around low tide, when the birds are too far out in the bay. Lighting at this spot is best in the evening, but again, depending on the tide, you can generally find birds in decent light in at least one direction.
    Peregrines became a serious issue as of today. They were screaming back and forth at one another endlessly and terrifying the shorebirds. I assume this is why the shorebirds don't really keep any kind of predictable routine, even when tide is taken into account. If there are no birds around this spot, walk west and get a new perspective on the bay. If still nothing, there is a slim chance they might be a Klopp Lake at high tide (for some reason they haven't yet really occupied the islands there yet this season).
    Low tide Tuesday is at 6:23 am, so you won't see too much if you get there at dawn, but you won't want to waste too much time on breakfast because the birds should be pouring in within about two hours. High tide is at 1:02 pm, and low at 6:04 pm. So I'd guess birding on Tuesday will be good from 8 or 8:30 am all the way until maybe 4 pm, with a possible chance of seeing some things at dusk as well.
    Tristan McKee
    Arcata, CA
    
    
  48. -back to top-
  49. SLO County Pelagic Trip LINK
    DATE: Jul 13, 2015 @ 10:37am, 16 day(s) ago
    WHEN: Saturday, September 26
    TIME: 7:00am - 3:00pm
    WHERE: Out of Avila Beach
    COST: $110
    
    It's time once again for our annual MCAS pelagic trip.
    
    We will depart from Port San Luis-Avila Beach on the 68’ Avenger for an eight hour birding excursion and will stay in San Luis Obispo County waters. The boat has a hot galley and food will be available.
    
    Leaders again this year are the eminently qualified Brad Schram, Curtis Marantz, and Tom Edell.
    
    Please email Mike Stiles <mstiles@...>
    to receive information and sign-up sheets. You will be placed on the passenger list in the order in which I receive your check and sign-up form. Beat the rush. Sign up today.
    
    Thank you,
    
    Mike Stiles
    Los Osos
    
    
  50. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
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v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
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 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'. 




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