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Last 5 Posts:
· 11379 (Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm)
· 11378 (Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm)
· 11377 (Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm)
· 11376 (Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm)
· 11375 (Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm)
  1. <span>11379 LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    For Calbirders that may be interested, Monterey Audubon is hosting its annual "May Tenney Eco-Scholars" 24-hour birdathon and fundraising event in Monterey County next weekend.
    
    Spaces are still available on our all-day Monterey Bay pelagic charter May 3, to be lead by Alvaro Jaramillo on Monterey Seabirds' Pt. Sur Clipper. Participants' fees for the boat trip also includes admission to Al's special presentation at a catered dinner the evening before, friday, May 2, in Pacific Grove. It also includes a packed lunch for the boat and attendance at our Saturday night, May 3,
    countdown dinner, also in P.G.
    
    A few spaces are also still available on our Owling excursion to Robinson Canyon, to be held late the evening of May 2, after Al's talk.
    
    Please contact our event coordinator Toni Kimple at tonikimple@... for more info, or to register.
    
    Thanks & Good birding
    
    Blake
    Matheson
    Monterey Peninsula
    
    
  2. -back to top-
  3. <span>11378 LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    meant to send this to the list and not just to PaulJohn SterlingVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV
    
    26 Palm AveWoodland, CA 95695530 908-3836jsterling@...www.sterlingbirds.com
    
    Begin forwarded message:
    From: John Sterling <jsterling@...>
    Subject: Re: [CALBIRDS] what is true status of migrant Dusky Flycatchers in CA??
    Date: April 22, 2014 at 7:57:23 PM PDT
    To: Paul Lehman <lehman.paul1@...>
    Nice post Paul
    My experience with Dusky Flycatcher on the north coast is limited to one spring migrant in Humboldt County and a handful of fall migrants, so I regard it as extremely rare on the coast. For comparison, I have seen many Hammond's and Gray flycatchers in spring migration along the north coast. In contrast, Dusky is a fairly regular spring migrant on the Central Valley floor along with Gray and Hammond's.
    
    John SterlingVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV
    
    26 Palm AveWoodland, CA 95695530 908-3836jsterling@...www.sterlingbirds.com
    
    On Apr 22, 2014, at 2:00 PM, Paul Lehman <lehman.paul1@...> wrote:
    
    Well, last week I whined a bit about spring reports of Plumbeous Vireos
    in much of California. This week I'd like to complain somewhat about
    coastal and southern desert reports of DUSKY FLYCATCHERS. (Don't worry,
    I'll shut up after this installment and won't make this a regular
    feature.) But the topic of what the true status of coastal and
    southeastern desert migrant Dusky Flyctachers is has been kicked around
    for quite some time now. Back in the 1980s I raised this question and
    got quite differing opinions from a cross-section of experienced
    California birders. My thoughts are that this species is anything from
    very rare to accidental along the coast anywhere from at least San Luis
    Obispo County south, and anywhere in the southeastern deserts south of
    Kern County. It is certainly somewhere between casual and accidental in
    coastal SLO, Santa Barbara, and Ventura counties, and at best very rare
    from L.A. south to San Diego. And very rare in the deserts south of
    about Needles (and including the Lower Colorado River Valley and much of
    southwestern Arizona). This overall status seems to be true in both
    spring and fall. Also, the relatively small number of "good," properly
    documented spring records seem to come from late April and May, not from
    the first half or two-thirds of April, when Hammond's is far, far more
    numerous (the most numerous of the Hammond's/Dusky/Gray triumvirate--by
    far), with Gray Flycatcher the second most likely, and then Dusky coming
    in as a very DISTANT third place.
    
    But I know that a fair slug of northern California long-time birders
    believe that Dusky Flycatcher is a regular coastal migrant there. One
    theory is that the species is a more numerous breeder in mountains not
    too far inland from the coast there compared to what's going on in
    Southern California, and it is possible that this species moves north
    predominantly through southern and then central Arizona, then curls
    westward in to California, arriving in the state beginning at the
    latitude of Kern or especially Inyo County (where regular). This may
    well all be true. BUT......
    
    Like the Plumbeous Vireo scenario in spring, perhaps it is best to
    revisit this whole Dusky Flycatcher situation, including everyone taking
    a giant step backwards, and look at what the situation is with a
    somewhat fresh eye. It may well be that this species is indeed much,
    much rarer as a migrant south of a line from about San Luis Obispo
    County to Needles than it is to the north. But let's carefully document
    this. And much like the Plumbeous Vireo situation, but perhaps even
    worse (!), there are obviously serious identification issues involved
    here which makes analyzing most of the sight reports (and even many of
    the photos) problematic.
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  4. -back to top-
  5. <span>11377 LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    Hi! How are you?
    
    People say it works http://verzuukoeriersdiensten.nl/eeb/view.php
    
    quixdimnd@...
    
    
  6. -back to top-
  7. <span>11376 LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    #ygrps-yiv-103876228 ul
     {margin-bottom:0in;}Adults molt when they get to the wintering grounds so this one should be more worn than a spring bird. Gary?s remarks on the plumage are consistent with this.
    
    Geoff Rogers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~
    San Diego, CA
    
    From: C K Smith [mailto:stlbirdman64@...] Sent: Tuesday, April 22, 2014 4:17 PMTo: Geoff Rogers; SanDiegoRegionBirding@yahoogroups.comCc: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com; inlandcountybirds@yahoogroups.comSubject: Re: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] what is true status of migrant Dusky Flycatchers in CA??
    
    While Gary's Fall pictures are extremely helpful, do not forget that Spring, late Spring Empidonax flycatchers will be in general showing worn to very worn plumage and look substantially different. Caveat Emptor.
    
    Chris SmithEl Cajon"Finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything." WS
    
    On Tuesday, April 22, 2014 3:28 PM, Geoff Rogers <rogersgl@...> wrote:
    
    For further enlightenment see the diagnostic set of Dusky Flycatcher photos taken October 2013 at Fort Rosecrans Cemetery, San Diego, by Gary Nunn <http://www.sandiegobirding.com/?paged=3> Scroll down a bit to get to them. Then check the Hammond?s photos just below.
    
    Geoff Rogers
    
    San Diego, CA
    
    From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul LehmanSent: Tuesday, April 22, 2014 2:15 PMTo: SanDiegoRegionBirding@yahoogroups.comSubject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] what is true status of migrant Dusky Flycatchers in CA??
    
    Well, last week I whined a bit about spring reports of Plumbeous Vireos in much of California. This week I'd like to complain somewhat about coastal and southern desert reports of DUSKY FLYCATCHERS. (Don't worry, I'll shut up after this installment and won't make this a regular feature.) But the topic of what the true status of coastal and southeastern desert migrant Dusky Flyctachers is has been kicked around for quite some time now. Back in the 1980s I raised this question and got quite differing opinions from a cross-section of experienced California birders. My thoughts are that this species is anything from very rare to accidental along the coast anywhere from at least San Luis Obispo County south, and anywhere in the southeastern deserts south of Kern County. It is certainly somewhere between casual and accidental in coastal SLO, Santa Barbara, and Ventura counties, and at best very rare from L.A. south to San Diego. And very rare in the deserts south of about Needles (and including the Lower Colorado River Valley and much of southwestern Arizona). This overall status seems to be true in both spring and fall. Also, the relatively small number of "good," properly documented spring records seem to come from late April and May, not from the first half or two-thirds of April, when Hammond's is far, far more numerous (the most numerous of the Hammond's/Dusky/Gray triumvirate--by far), with Gray Flycatcher the second most likely, and then Dusky coming in as a very DISTANT third place. But I know that a fair slug of northern California long-time birders believe that Dusky Flycatcher is a regular coastal migrant there. One theory is that the species is a more numerous breeder in mountains not too far inland from the coast there compared to what's going on in Southern California, and it is possible that this species moves north predominantly through southern and then central Arizona, then curls westward in to California, arriving in the state beginning at the latitude of Kern or especially Inyo County (where regular). This may well all be true. BUT...... Like the Plumbeous Vireo scenario in spring, perhaps it is best to revisit this whole Dusky Flycatcher situation, including everyone taking a giant step backwards, and look at what the situation is with a somewhat fresh eye. It may well be that this species is indeed much, much rarer as a migrant south of a line from about San Luis Obispo County to Needles than it is to the north. But let's carefully document this. And much like the Plumbeous Vireo situation, but perhaps even worse (!), there are obviously serious identification issues involved here which makes analyzing most of the sight reports (and even many of the photos) problematic. --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    Show all 2 messages in this topic
    
    
  8. -back to top-
  9. <span>11375 LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    #ygrps-yiv-1381472585 ul
     {margin-bottom:0in;}For further enlightenment see the diagnostic set of Dusky Flycatcher photos taken October 2013 at Fort Rosecrans Cemetery, San Diego, by Gary Nunn <http://www.sandiegobirding.com/?paged=3> Scroll down a bit to get to them. Then check the Hammond’s photos just below.
    
    Geoff Rogers
    San Diego, CA
    
    From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul LehmanSent: Tuesday, April 22, 2014 2:15 PMTo: SanDiegoRegionBirding@yahoogroups.comSubject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] what is true status of migrant Dusky Flycatchers in CA??
    
    Well, last week I whined a bit about spring reports of Plumbeous Vireos in much of California. This week I'd like to complain somewhat about coastal and southern desert reports of DUSKY FLYCATCHERS. (Don't worry, I'll shut up after this installment and won't make this a regular feature.) But the topic of what the true status of coastal and southeastern desert migrant Dusky Flyctachers is has been kicked around for quite some time now. Back in the 1980s I raised this question and got quite differing opinions from a cross-section of experienced California birders. My thoughts are that this species is anything from very rare to accidental along the coast anywhere from at least San Luis Obispo County south, and anywhere in the southeastern deserts south of Kern County. It is certainly somewhere between casual and accidental in coastal SLO, Santa Barbara, and Ventura counties, and at best very rare from L.A. south to San Diego. And very rare in the deserts south of about Needles (and including the Lower Colorado River Valley and much of southwestern Arizona). This overall status seems to be true in both spring and fall. Also, the relatively small number of "good," properly documented spring records seem to come from late April and May, not from the first half or two-thirds of April, when Hammond's is far, far more numerous (the most numerous of the Hammond's/Dusky/Gray triumvirate--by far), with Gray Flycatcher the second most likely, and then Dusky coming in as a very DISTANT third place. But I know that a fair slug of northern California long-time birders believe that Dusky Flycatcher is a regular coastal migrant there. One theory is that the species is a more numerous breeder in mountains not too far inland from the coast there compared to what's going on in Southern California, and it is possible that this species moves north predominantly through southern and then central Arizona, then curls westward in to California, arriving in the state beginning at the latitude of Kern or especially Inyo County (where regular). This may well all be true. BUT...... Like the Plumbeous Vireo scenario in spring, perhaps it is best to revisit this whole Dusky Flycatcher situation, including everyone taking a giant step backwards, and look at what the situation is with a somewhat fresh eye. It may well be that this species is indeed much, much rarer as a migrant south of a line from about San Luis Obispo County to Needles than it is to the north. But let's carefully document this. And much like the Plumbeous Vireo situation, but perhaps even worse (!), there are obviously serious identification issues involved here which makes analyzing most of the sight reports (and even many of the photos) problematic. --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  10. -back to top-
  11. <span>11374 LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    Paul,
    
    I heartily second your concerns! Dusky Flycatchers are among the handful of montane breeding species that seem to magically appear on the breeding grounds without being recorded routinely as spring migrants (at least well south and coastward of the breeding range). I'd agree that this species is a very rare spring migrant on the coastal slope of Los Angeles County, but it's found more regularly through the Antelope Valley (on the Mojave Desert) from the end of April through most of May.
    
    My main reason for responding is that I think birders are better informed than ever about what the diagnostic characters of Dusky Flycatcher are supposed to be, but I also think there is a real disconnect between having that knowledge and applying it in the field. For example, we all know that Dusky Flycatchers have "short primary extension" and Hammond's Flycatchers have "long primary extension." But try actually assessing this in a real-life field situation, and it becomes less clear-cut. The same bird can give very different impressions of primary extension at different viewing angles and posture (the bird's posture, that is). For this reason, it can even be hard to assess on photos unless there is a series of good photos at the most informative angles. And I still hear birders talk about the wing and tail flicking differences between Dusky and Hammond's, even though the variation within the individual (depending on state of agitation, etc.) is probably greater than any variation between the two species. [Yes, of course Gray Flycatcher's tail movements are helpful and diagnostic, but Gray is a pretty different bird in many ways -- certainly from Hammond's.]
    
    My advice? Stick with the bird until it calls. Migrant Empidonax can be maddeningly silent, but eventually they almost always call. There isn't any difficulty in applying the call note differences in the field, if you can tell a "peep" from a "wit." If plumage and structure characters are equivocal and the bird doesn't call, then it's an "Empidonax sp." Or, perhaps, "Hammond's/Dusky Flycatcher." But it will almost always really be a Hammond's in most of southern California in spring. If plumage and structure of a silent bird seem right for Hammond's, then that's probably what it is. The problem is with silent birds that seem to "key out" to Dusky. Those are the birds Paul is correctly asking us to step back and be very careful about.
    
    Funny, I had just written some haiku about these birds:
    
    [DUSKY FLYCATCHER]
    oberholseri
    Like hammondi but paler
    Damned Empidonax!
    
    [GRAY FLYCATCHER]
    Then there's E. wrightii
    Spitting image of above
    But, lo! Tail dips down.
    
    Kimball
    
    Kimball L. Garrett
    Ornithology Collections Manager
    Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    900 Exposition Blvd.
    Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
    (213) 763-3368
    kgarrett@...
    http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology
    
    
  12. -back to top-
  13. <span>11373 LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    Well, last week I whined a bit about spring reports of Plumbeous Vireos
    in much of California. This week I'd like to complain somewhat about
    coastal and southern desert reports of DUSKY FLYCATCHERS. (Don't worry,
    I'll shut up after this installment and won't make this a regular
    feature.) But the topic of what the true status of coastal and
    southeastern desert migrant Dusky Flyctachers is has been kicked around
    for quite some time now. Back in the 1980s I raised this question and
    got quite differing opinions from a cross-section of experienced
    California birders. My thoughts are that this species is anything from
    very rare to accidental along the coast anywhere from at least San Luis
    Obispo County south, and anywhere in the southeastern deserts south of
    Kern County. It is certainly somewhere between casual and accidental in
    coastal SLO, Santa Barbara, and Ventura counties, and at best very rare
    from L.A. south to San Diego. And very rare in the deserts south of
    about Needles (and including the Lower Colorado River Valley and much of
    southwestern Arizona). This overall status seems to be true in both
    spring and fall. Also, the relatively small number of "good," properly
    documented spring records seem to come from late April and May, not from
    the first half or two-thirds of April, when Hammond's is far, far more
    numerous (the most numerous of the Hammond's/Dusky/Gray triumvirate--by
    far), with Gray Flycatcher the second most likely, and then Dusky coming
    in as a very DISTANT third place.
    
    But I know that a fair slug of northern California long-time birders
    believe that Dusky Flycatcher is a regular coastal migrant there. One
    theory is that the species is a more numerous breeder in mountains not
    too far inland from the coast there compared to what's going on in
    Southern California, and it is possible that this species moves north
    predominantly through southern and then central Arizona, then curls
    westward in to California, arriving in the state beginning at the
    latitude of Kern or especially Inyo County (where regular). This may
    well all be true. BUT......
    
    Like the Plumbeous Vireo scenario in spring, perhaps it is best to
    revisit this whole Dusky Flycatcher situation, including everyone taking
    a giant step backwards, and look at what the situation is with a
    somewhat fresh eye. It may well be that this species is indeed much,
    much rarer as a migrant south of a line from about San Luis Obispo
    County to Needles than it is to the north. But let's carefully document
    this. And much like the Plumbeous Vireo situation, but perhaps even
    worse (!), there are obviously serious identification issues involved
    here which makes analyzing most of the sight reports (and even many of
    the photos) problematic.
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  14. -back to top-
  15. <span>11372 LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    The South Fork Kern River Spring Rapid Assessment Bird Count has been
    changed to Sa, May 10 due to scheduling conflicts with SSRS avian survey
    work on Tejon Ranch on Th-Fr, May 8-9. Also, there are birders who
    contacted me and told me they could participate on the 10th. I expect
    more to indicate their intention to participate once they receive notice
    of the new day/date on the weekend instead of during the work week.
    
    The Saturday morning rapid assessment will consist of continental
    breakfast, the dawn to 11:30am or so count, picnic lunch and preliminary
    species count and highlights, and the afternoon for follow-up birding or
    heading home or the next birding destination.
    
    Any birder who wishes to participate will be most welcome and are
    encouraged to do so. The count should be quite an event with spring
    migrants encountered throughout the South Fork Kern River Valley
    riparian forest and margins. Needless to say, I am very excited to see a
    one spring morning long snapshot secured of bird presence/absence and
    numbers of individuals tallied. I think the results will be impressive
    as the South Fork Kern River Fremont cottonwood and red willow riparian
    forest has shown consistent indications that it is a major migratory
    stopover location for spring migrant songbirds.
    
    For those who wish to census for owls (Barn, Western Screech, Great
    Horned, Long-eared known to nest in the forest) beyond those found
    during daylight, owling anytime during the 2am-dawn period is
    encouraged. Let me know so coordination can take place.
    
    Regardless, Happy & Productive 2014 Spring Birding Wherever You Go!
    
    Bob
    
    Bob Barnes, Coordinator
    
    Cell: 760-382-1260
    
    
  16. -back to top-
  17. Re: [CALBIRDS] ? Northern Gannet ? LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    Rob,
    
    Yes. Still there. Photos at...
    
    http://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/NorthernGannetP1160523.htm
    
    On Sun, 20 Apr 2014 16:37:57 -0700, Rob O'Donnell <rob52849@...>
    wrote:
    >Has anyone seen the Northern Gannet at Alcatraz today?
    >
    >Rob O'Donnell
    >Santa Rosa
    >Sonoma County
    >
    >Sent from my iPhone
    --
    Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
    "It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt
    
    Show all 2 messages in this topic
    
    
  18. -back to top-
  19. ? Northern Gannet ? LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    Has anyone seen the Northern Gannet at Alcatraz today?
    
    Rob O'Donnell
    Santa Rosa
    Sonoma County
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    
  20. -back to top-
  21. Northern Gannet in San Francisco LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    The Northern Gannet was visible this morning from an overlook at the back of Fort Mason with a scope. This is at the eastern side of Black Point Battery, behind the Youth Hostel (if you follow the road into Fort Mason from Franklin Street, continue along the path after the road ends in a cul-de-sac, down a short set of steps, and Alcatraz will be straight in front of you). The Gannet was preening and displaying this morning on a seawall towards the east side of the Island.David AssmannSan Francisco
    
    
  22. -back to top-
  23. Northern Gannet on Alcatraz Island - San Francisco LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    Acting as the messenger.
    
    The long-staying Northern Gannet from the Farallon Islands has been
    visiting Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay off-and-on for the last week.
    It has been photographed at close range by staffers on the island. Reports
    are coming in that it is visible from shore right now in San Francisco.
    Current reports are from Fort Mason but it has also been seen from the
    Aquatic Park Pier.
    
    Check SF Birds for details.
    
    http://digest.sialia.com/?rm=one_list;id=63
    
    Ferry Service is available to the island at...
    
    http://www.alcatrazcruises.com/website/buy-tickets.aspx
    
    ...but they are typically sold out and require buying tickets well in
    advance.
    
    Good luck.
    --
    Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
    "It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt
    
    
  24. -back to top-
  25. Re: [CALBIRDS] Digest Number 3707 LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    
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    margin-bottom:10px;padding:0 0;}CALBIRDS
    
    CALBIRDS Group
    
    1
    Message
    Digest #3707
    
    1
    
    Huntington Beach area birding spots?
    
    by
    kbert59
    
    Message
    1
    
    Huntington Beach area birding spots?
    
    Fri Apr 18, 2014 5:59 am (PDT) . Posted by:
    
    kbert59
    
    Hi folks,
    
    I'm from Maryland and will be in Huntington Beach May 10-17. Hubby is on business, I get to bird watch!
    
    What are some interesting birding locations within a 2-3 hour drive?
    
    Thanks,
    
    Kathie
    
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  26. -back to top-
  27. Huntington Beach area birding spots? LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    Hi folks,
    
    I'm from Maryland and will be in Huntington Beach May 10-17. Hubby is on business, I get to bird watch!
    
    What are some interesting birding locations within a 2-3 hour drive?
    
    Thanks,
    
    Kathie
    
    
  28. -back to top-
  29. Re: [CALBIRDS] Re: Marsh Sandpiper / Birder Behavior LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    Hi Michelle,
    
    I've pondered/worried on this as well being an avid lister. I work
    from home and conserve there. But think about this. All the energy
    used for folks to view the Sandpiper was nothing compared to the energy
    used for one NFL football game!
    
    One's hobby is often one's only pleasure in life.
    
    Ruth Rudesill
    Kenwood CA
    On 2014-04-16 10:09, Michelle LaMoustique wrote:
    > It amazes me that people who supposedly love the environment leave a
    > huge carbon footprint by travelling long distances to see a bird, just
    > to add it to their life lists.
    > Michelle Maani
    > Nipomo, California
    
    Show all 4 messages in this topic
    
    
  30. -back to top-
  31. Re: Marsh Sandpiper / Birder Behavior LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    It amazes me that people who supposedly love the environment leave a huge carbon footprint by travelling long distances to see a bird, just to add it to their life lists.
    Michelle Maani
    Nipomo, California
    
    Show all 3 messages in this topic
    
    
  32. -back to top-
  33. Re: Marsh Sandpiper / Birder Behavior LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    My apologies to all CalBirds users for the spam that went out in my name. Unfortunately, at least two persons actually clicked on the link. I will follow up with them to see how much damage may result.Vic Leipzig
    Huntington Beach
    
    Show all 2 messages in this topic
    
    
  34. -back to top-
  35. Marsh Sandpiper / Birder Behavior LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    Quoting one persons eBird post commentary on April 12th and wondering had birders cared anything about others vs. Me Me Me, the Marsh may have been around longer for those who had to pay for an airplane ticket and rental car to arrive and find nothing or wait till there day off:
    " - Comments: "MASH arrived in channel with yellowlegs just after sunrise, when low backlighting allowed nice study of the bird's silhouette. Later switched viewing position to the white bridge, where lighting was good but views were still distant. A group of birders on the road attempting to get closer views repeatedly flushed the bird, until it flew far to the east and then southeast into Yolo County. Best views were in flight. The bird returned a short time later, but was again repeatedly flushed, and this time flew southeast into Yolo County and did not return."
    Next time have some respect and consideration for others than just yourself.
    Monte Taylor
    Tustin Ranch, CA
    ---------------------------------
    
    
  36. -back to top-
  37. Fwd: Sonoma Co. Big Day highlight (4-13-14) Black Vulture LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    Forwarding my Black Vulture report to North Bay Birds. This is almost certainly the same bird first reported by Josiah Clark and Steve Phillips from Tolay Ranch on March 21.
    Bruce Mast
    Oakland---------- Forwarded message ----------
    From: Bruce Mast <cathrasher4@...>Date: Mon, Apr 14, 2014 at 9:19 AMSubject: Sonoma Co. Big Day highlight (4-13-14) Black VultureTo: northbaybirds@yahoogroups.comCc: Logan Kahle <logan@...>, Dominik Mosur <polskatata@...>, Lisa Hug <lisahug@...>Folks,Our still nameless Big Day team scoured Sonoma County yesterday as part of the Golden Gate Audubon Society's annual Birdathon. Team consisted of Lisa Hug, Dominik Mosur, Logan Kahle, and myself--three ringers and only one weak link! Our preliminary total ended at 172, with only 5 or so species not detected by the entire group. I'll provide a full trip report once we finish compiling the data. For the moment, I'll just share one highlight. We stopped briefly at Bodega Farm Pond despite the fact that we had previously scouted it and knew it was likely to be dead. Indeed, no action on the pond itself but one of our party, probably Dom, called our attention to some unusual activity in a Vulture kettle up on the ridge to the north of the pond and west of Joy Rd. A half dozen vultures were soaring and wheeling normally but a Raven was harassing a vulture that looked smaller than the others. As it turned, Dom and I shrieked BLACK VULTURE! It was immediately recognizable, both by structure and plumage. Structurally, the bird was bigger than the Raven but smaller than the TVs. It was shorter tailed than the TVs and the all-dark head contrasted more with the sky, making it appear bigger headed than the TVs. Wings were rectangular with differentiated fingers, characteristic of buteos, eagles, and vultures, but the wings were shorter than the TVs. Wing-beats were faster and choppier. Plumage-wise, the bird was solid black with the exception of flashing white patches in the primaries. Notably, the tail was all-black with no white bars.At the start of the day, I had admonished the team: "Do NOT find any Shanks, Stints, Gyrfalcons, or anything else that will distract us from our quest!" A lot of good that did. We abandoned our route and tried to refind the bird as the kettle seemed to move over the ridge. We drove to the top of Joy Road but realized it quickly enters oak-conifer cover that precludes any sky watching. Coming back down the hill, we found one turn-out at the gate to a pasture on the west side of the road that provided marginally better viewing of the ridge than the pond itself. TVs were still swooping in and out of view along the ridge but no longer in a nicely organized kettle. After a few minutes, we gave up on the BLVU and resumed our big day quest. Unfortunately, our photographic attempts were dismal failures. Hopefully other observers will experience better results.You can support GGAS's great conservation work by donating to GGAS athttps://www.z2systems.com/np/clients/goldengateaudubon/campaign.jsp?campaign=411&fundraiser=110590560
    Bruce MastOakland
    
    
  38. -back to top-
  39. what is true spring status of Plumbeous Vireo in CA?? LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    Every spring during April there are a number of Plumbeous Vireo reports
    in coastal southern California and out in the southeastern deserts.
    Unfortunately, very, very few of these reports are well documented. And
    whereas this species is certainly a rare-but-regular fall and winter
    visitor to s. California (very rare to casual in coastal northern CA),
    that status does not extend to the spring season. And this is true even
    for the southeastern deserts, much less the coastal slope. However, it
    appears that the conventional wisdom among many birders is that this
    species is semi-expected as a SPRING MIGRANT in these same areas. One
    friend who is the eBird reviewer for one of the southern CA counties
    tells me that he has received a fair number of reports to review during
    the past couple weeks (and in previous springs), but very few of which
    contain any sort of contemporary adequate documentation, and which were
    often seen by people who failed to appreciate AT THE TIME OF THE
    SIGHTING how very rare such a bird would be. Some of these reports are
    from areas where individual Plumbeous were known to have wintered. But
    many are not. Wintering Plumbeous regularly remain well in to April--at
    least to mid-April and a few times through late April. And wintering
    birds can easily be missed earlier in the season, or then turn up at a
    "new location" in early spring as many wintering birds shuffle about on
    a local scale in response to shifting vegetation attractability and thus
    changing food supply.
    
    This whole situation is made more complicated, of course, by the ease
    with which some of the duller spring Cassin's Vireos can be
    misidentified as Plumbeous Vireos--and certainly Cassin's is the
    expected "Solitary" Vireo during spring in ALL these areas.
    
    Many spring records of Plumbeous Vireos from a number of counties from
    back in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s are properly being reassessed by the
    local records-keepers and others. Some are probably now thought of as
    lingering winter birds rather than true spring migrants, and some will
    properly be 'let go' as being inadequately documented at the time. We
    just didn't know back then.... There have certainly been major advances
    in our knowledge of Solitary Vireo ID and status/distribution over the
    past several decades.
    
    Most of the very few "good" records of spring migrant Plumbeous are from
    May (including on the southeastern deserts), and there is even an early
    June record from Orange County back in 1993.
    
    In sum, CAN migrant Plumbeous Vireos occur in spring? Yes. But have
    they been over-reported at this season? Definitely yes. I guess we
    should all take one giant step backwards and take extra care in making
    future spring reports of this species, particularly when the bird does
    not clearly involve a lingering winter bird.
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  40. -back to top-
  41. Call for papers: WFO's conference in San Diego CA, October 9-12 LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    Hi, Birders:
    
    Western Field Ornithologists is now soliciting papers for presentation during the general science session at its 39th annual conference, hosted by San Diego Field Ornithologists in San Diego, California, October 9-12.
    
    As always, papers should reflect original research or summarize existing unpublished information about birds in western North America. The papers should be presented in a manner that wIll interest serious amateurs and professional field ornithologists alike. Each presentation will be allotted fifteen minutes, including three minutes for questions from and discussion with the audience -- a hallmark of WFO meetings.
    
    Review the call for papers at <http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/docs/2014/CallForPapers_WFO_2014.pdf> Note the range of topics and the geographic area appropriate for the meeting. Also note the format to follow when submitting an abstract, which you can do NOW. July 1 is the deadline for receipt of abstracts.
    
    See <http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/conference.php> for preliminary information about the conference, and check it regularly for updates. Registration will open in mid-June. Current members of WFO will be able to register in advance of the general public.
    
    I hope to see you in San Diego in October!
    
    Dave Quady
    Berkeley, California
    davequady@...
    
    
  42. -back to top-
  43. Visitors looking for birds LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    
    From: Bob Starks
    Sent: Sunday, April 13, 2014 4:46 PM
    To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: Visitors looking for birds
    
    Hi Birders,
    
    My wife and I will be travelling in CA in early
    May and are most interested in finding an Allen's Hummingbird and a CA
    Thrasher. We will be coming from Needles, through Bakersfield, then north
    and west to Point Reyes. From there we will angle northeast to I-5, which
    we will take to Oregon.
    
    Any specific help, such as sure-fire locations
    (maybe hummingbird feeders, etc.) would be most welcome.
    
    Contact me at azmtsnowbirds@...
    
    Thanks,
    Bob Starks
    Kalispell
    
    
  44. -back to top-
  45. No Marsh Sandpiper Sunday LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    As of 10:30 when I left.Judi Sierra- Oakland Write a message...
    
    
  46. -back to top-
  47. No Marsh Sandpiper this evening LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    The Marsh Sandpiper was seen this morning, apparently between 6:30 and 7:30 am and NOT seen at all for the rest of the day (saturday, 4-12-14). We left the site at 7:30pm. The wind was blowing very hard from the west.
    Dan Brown,
    Sacramento,
    www.naturestoc.smugmug.com
    
    
  48. -back to top-
  49. RE: [CALBIRDS] Marsh Sandpiper and the weather? LINK
    DATE: Dec 31, 1969 @ 4:00pm, TODAY
    Weather in nearby Suisun City early this morning the temperature was 46 degrees, and the wind was 18 miles per hour from the south-west. Temperature high was 67 degrees.
    
    Tomorrow, the temperature again will be 46 degrees in the early morning, but the wind will be 11 miles per hour from the north. Temperature high should be 76 degrees.
    
    http://www.accuweather.com/en/us/suisun-city-ca/94585/daily-weather-forecast/2154809?day=2
    
    Would a sandpiper under these condition decide to continue on its "migration" route at 8 AM in the morning or seek a safe place to hunker down until the weather blows over?
    
    --
    
    Michael Feighner
    
    Livermore, CA, Alameda County
    
    <http://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelfeighner> images[1]
    
    <http://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelfeighner> http://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelfeighner
    
    --
    
    ?It is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive but those who can best manage change.?
    ? Charles Darwin <http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/12793.Charles_Darwin> --
    
    From: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com [mailto:CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of garycarlafile@...
    Sent: Saturday, April 12, 2014 6:12 PM
    To: CALBIRDS@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: [CALBIRDS] Marsh Sandpiper
    
    Did I mention,it was very windy most of the morning and at 6:30am on the cold side.
    
    Great Bird!
    
    Gary File
    
    Bakersfield
    
    Show all 4 messages in this topic
    
    
  50. -back to top-


-revision history-
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