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trending topics in last 20 posts.
Last 5 Posts:
· Tufted Duck, Stafford Lake Marin County (TODAY)
· Re: Trumpeter Swans in Sutter Co. (Jan 25, 2015)
· Trumpeter Swans in Sutter Co. (Jan 25, 2015)
· Fwd: Rustic Bunting (Jan 22, 2015)
· Re: [CALBIRDS] Santa Barbara Painted Redstart plumages and occurrences (and vagrancy occurrence in general) (Jan 18, 2015)
  1. Tufted Duck, Stafford Lake Marin County LINK
    DATE: TODAY @ 8:47pm, TODAY
    There is an adult male TUFTED DUCK on Stafford Lake just outside of Novato in Marin County. We saw the bird posted on ebird on 1/20/15 but didn't see any postings here. We decided to check it out today and found the bird among many Ring-necked Ducks at the southwest corner of the lake. There are also a few Greater Scaup, many Canada Geese, one Aluetian Cackling Goose, many American Wigeon, and several Spotted Sandpipers in the lake and along the shore. Good bird!
    
    Note to birders: there is a $5 fee to access the lake and park.
    
    Here are a few (bad) digiscoped pictures on my flickr page: Tufted Duck
    
    Tufted Duck View the album on Flickr.
    
    View on flic.kr
    Preview by Yahoo
    
    Shannon and Dan Skalos, Pleasant Grove, CA
    Andrea Mott, Willows, CA
    
    
  2. -back to top-
  3. Re: Trumpeter Swans in Sutter Co. LINK
    DATE: Jan 25, 2015 @ 9:15am, 1 day(s) ago
    I have posted a photo album with swan images from both Chico WTP and Pennington Rd., accessible at https://picasaweb.google.com/115664736039227190081/TrumpeterSwans20150124?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCLiS9cGqirmZxgE&feat=directlink.I have also updated my eBird documentation. See http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21527861 (Pennington Rd.) and http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S21516479 (Chico WTP).
    One correction to my earlier post: the Chico birds initially took off to the south but then they banked and headed north, consistent with Larry Jordan's report. My posted flight photos show them heading south (right to left) but I also have more distant unpublished views of them flying in the opposite direction.
    Bruce Mast
    Oakland
    On Sat, Jan 24, 2015 at 9:28 PM, Bruce Mast <cathrasher4@...> wrote:The story actually begins in Butte County, where I traveled to Chico WTP this morning (Saturday, Jan. 24) to admire the continuing adult + juvenile pair of Trumpeters that Ken Schneider first found back on Jan. 10. I arrived at the WTP around 7:15 and the Trumpeters flew into the SE pond just as I was walking up. I got good long looks and a number of mediocre photographs. Then around 8:05 they took to the air heading south and I didn't see them again.
    Fast forward to this evening, when I found myself birding Pennington Road in Sutter County just north of Sutter Buttes. There is a flooded field on the south side of the road at (39.2755, -121.7478) and I noticed 2 swans on the water with the ducks. On closer inspection, one was an adult and the second one was a juvenile with gray head and some gray on the back. Looking even closer, I concluded they were Trumpeters--long sloping foreheads, all-black bills on both birds, evenly rounded backs, what appeared to be widows peaks on their foreheads--the same field marks I saw this morning. I got a number of distant photos in fading light. My first thought was that I had stumbled on the Chico birds but the photos of the Sutter juvenile shows less gray in the body.
    Before you go chase these birds, you should know that they took off while I watched and flew straight south on a direct course, passing to the east of the buttes. Who knows where they will turn up. It will also be interesting to see if the Chico Trumps reappear in the coming days.
    I'll provide a link to photos tomorrow.Bruce Mast
    Oakland
    
    
  4. -back to top-
  5. Trumpeter Swans in Sutter Co. LINK
    DATE: Jan 25, 2015 @ 9:28pm, 1 day(s) ago
    The story actually begins in Butte County, where I traveled to Chico WTP this morning (Saturday, Jan. 24) to admire the continuing adult + juvenile pair of Trumpeters that Ken Schneider first found back on Jan. 10. I arrived at the WTP around 7:15 and the Trumpeters flew into the SE pond just as I was walking up. I got good long looks and a number of mediocre photographs. Then around 8:05 they took to the air heading south and I didn't see them again.
    Fast forward to this evening, when I found myself birding Pennington Road in Sutter County just north of Sutter Buttes. There is a flooded field on the south side of the road at (39.2755, -121.7478) and I noticed 2 swans on the water with the ducks. On closer inspection, one was an adult and the second one was a juvenile with gray head and some gray on the back. Looking even closer, I concluded they were Trumpeters--long sloping foreheads, all-black bills on both birds, evenly rounded backs, what appeared to be widows peaks on their foreheads--the same field marks I saw this morning. I got a number of distant photos in fading light. My first thought was that I had stumbled on the Chico birds but the photos of the Sutter juvenile shows less gray in the body.
    Before you go chase these birds, you should know that they took off while I watched and flew straight south on a direct course, passing to the east of the buttes. Who knows where they will turn up. It will also be interesting to see if the Chico Trumps reappear in the coming days.
    I'll provide a link to photos tomorrow.Bruce Mast
    Oakland
    
    
  6. -back to top-
  7. Fwd: Rustic Bunting LINK
    DATE: Jan 22, 2015 @ 11:53am, 4 day(s) ago
    Sent from my iPhone
    Begin forwarded message:
    From: "Ecjmhall@..." <Ecjmhall@...>Date: January 22, 2015 at 11:49:03 AM PSTTo: "calbird@yahoogroups.com" <calbird@yahoogroups.com>Subject: Rustic Bunting
    Bird present in GGP foraging with Juncos 0745 and later in early AM today. Ed HallEscondido CASent from my iPhone
    
  8. -back to top-
  9. Re: [CALBIRDS] Santa Barbara Painted Redstart plumages and occurrences (and vagrancy occurrence in general) LINK
    DATE: Jan 18, 2015 @ 6:31pm, 8 day(s) ago
    Hi Paul,
    1. I remember chasing a Rufous-backed Robin in eastern San Diego County. Guy McCaskie was standing next to me and John Small, and U asked Guy what caused this one Rufous-backed Robin to show up here. Guy responded that it wasn't the only one in the state; it was the only one found by birders.
    2. I have a field about warblers, a hardcover book that covers all of the Western Hemisphere wood warblers, and says that there are differences among first year--and older birds.
    Tom Miko
    Claremont
    LA County
    909.241.3300
    Http://www.tgmiko.com
    On Jan 17, 2015 12:36 PM, "Paul Lehman lehman.paul1@... [CALBIRDS]" <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
     
    
    There have been some posts stating that the Rocky Nook Park (Santa Barbara) Painted Redstart
    is an "adult" or a "male" and that a much duller bird briefly seen
    nearby might be a different Painted Redstart. But essentially ALL
    Painted Redstarts, once they molt out of juvenile plumage by late summer
    soon after being born, all LOOK THE SAME. It would be extremely
    difficult to determine, in the field and without exceptional close-up
    photos, whether the Rocky Nook bird is an adult or a first-year immature
    and whether it is a male or a female. They are all similarly stunning,
    no matter!
    
    Also, a few folks have wondered if this bird might well be the same
    individual as the one some 20 miles away at Refugio during the fall.
    The odds of this being the case are extremely, remotely small. Such
    single vagrant passerines, once they move on, likely migrate a couple
    hundred miles their first night to who-knows-where, rather than moving
    about locally a far fewer number of miles. This likelihood of re-finding
    the same individual is true for ALL nocturnal (and most diurnal)
    vagrant/migrant landbirds everywhere. Yes, there are a very, very, very
    few exceptions to this 'rule', such as the crazy spring Snow Bunting
    found a number of years ago in San Diego which was then rediscovered a
    couple weeks later back north in Monterey, this being determined by
    comparing close-up photos of "both" and noting identical unique
    feather-wear patterns. The number of individual vagrant landbirds that
    birders find in even reasonably well-birded areas is a drop in the
    bucket of what is actually present during a season. Perhaps they find 5
    percent at best, in most areas?? Maybe 20 percent in THE most heavily
    birded areas?? Maybe. So, two Painted Redstarts in southern Santa
    Barbara County over a several-month period (Oct-Jan) might be 10 percent
    of what the true number of PAREs that actually occurred along the South
    Coast during that period--and that may be way too high a guess at the
    percent! We birders are finding just a tiny fraction of the rare birds
    that are out there, no matter how hard we try!
    
    --Paul Lehman
    
    
  10. -back to top-
  11. bell's sparrow LINK
    DATE: Jan 17, 2015 @ 2:24pm, 9 day(s) ago
    Hi
    Where would be the best places to find BELL?S SPARROW? What are the best
    months to look; May?
    
    Thanks
    Ron Maertz
    Glide Or
  12. -back to top-
  13. Santa Barbara Painted Redstart plumages and occurrences (and vagrancy occurrence in general) LINK
    DATE: Jan 17, 2015 @ 12:36pm, 9 day(s) ago
    There have been some posts stating that the Rocky Nook Park (Santa Barbara) Painted Redstart
    is an "adult" or a "male" and that a much duller bird briefly seen
    nearby might be a different Painted Redstart. But essentially ALL
    Painted Redstarts, once they molt out of juvenile plumage by late summer
    soon after being born, all LOOK THE SAME. It would be extremely
    difficult to determine, in the field and without exceptional close-up
    photos, whether the Rocky Nook bird is an adult or a first-year immature
    and whether it is a male or a female. They are all similarly stunning,
    no matter!
    
    Also, a few folks have wondered if this bird might well be the same
    individual as the one some 20 miles away at Refugio during the fall.
    The odds of this being the case are extremely, remotely small. Such
    single vagrant passerines, once they move on, likely migrate a couple
    hundred miles their first night to who-knows-where, rather than moving
    about locally a far fewer number of miles. This likelihood of re-finding
    the same individual is true for ALL nocturnal (and most diurnal)
    vagrant/migrant landbirds everywhere. Yes, there are a very, very, very
    few exceptions to this 'rule', such as the crazy spring Snow Bunting
    found a number of years ago in San Diego which was then rediscovered a
    couple weeks later back north in Monterey, this being determined by
    comparing close-up photos of "both" and noting identical unique
    feather-wear patterns. The number of individual vagrant landbirds that
    birders find in even reasonably well-birded areas is a drop in the
    bucket of what is actually present during a season. Perhaps they find 5
    percent at best, in most areas?? Maybe 20 percent in THE most heavily
    birded areas?? Maybe. So, two Painted Redstarts in southern Santa
    Barbara County over a several-month period (Oct-Jan) might be 10 percent
    of what the true number of PAREs that actually occurred along the South
    Coast during that period--and that may be way too high a guess at the
    percent! We birders are finding just a tiny fraction of the rare birds
    that are out there, no matter how hard we try!
    
    --Paul Lehman
    
    
  14. -back to top-
  15. Roseate Spoonbill LINK
    DATE: Jan 17, 2015 @ 11:42am, 9 day(s) ago
    Bob and I had eye-popping views of the ROSEATE SPOONBILL at the end of Garst Road (through the muddy road). It was 100 yards away preening on some rocks. We watched it for about 20 minutes when I went back to the car for my PhoneSkope. I met up with Matthew Page, Louis Tucker, Karin Kersteter, and Josh Lietzow and led them toward the spot. About halfway back to the spot we saw Bob walking back toward us! The bird had flown but Bob was able to tell us where he last saw it. With all of us looking, Matthew was able to find it again. However it was on the opposite side of the water about half a mile away. We all got good looks at it preening on top of a hunting blind.
    
    Michelle Townsley
    Ventura CountySent from my iPhone
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  17. UPDATE: Youth scholarships for WFO conference, Billings MT, June 2015 LINK
    DATE: Jan 17, 2015 @ 11:46am, 9 day(s) ago
    Hello, Birders:
    Up to four Pasadena Audubon/Western Field Ornithologists Youth Scholarships are being offered to Western Field Ornithologists' annual conference in Billings, Montana June 10-14, 2015. These competitive scholarships are available to students in Grades 6 through 12. Applications are being accepted now through FEBRUARY 9 (deadline has been extended). The WFO conference offers the opportunity for young, motivated youth to meet and bird with some of the people who earn their living and/or volunteer in field ornithology, bird conservation, biology and other distinguished fields.Details of the scholarships, and instructions on how to apply, are posted at <http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/scholarship.php>.I look forward to meeting the scholarship recipients, and their escorts/parents, in Billings!Dave QuadyBerkeley, Californiadavequady@...
  18. -back to top-
  19. Rustic Bunting continues LINK
    DATE: Jan 17, 2015 @ 3:44pm, 9 day(s) ago
    The continuing Rustic Bunting was foraging with one junco at 3:15 today as the rain started, 20 yards south of wood pile.
    
    Anil Antony Glendale
    
    
  20. -back to top-
  21. Re: [SFBirds] Rustic Bunting Continues in Golden Gate Park LINK
    DATE: Jan 16, 2015 @ 8:19am, 10 day(s) ago
    It was in the same place on 1/15, well seen around 2:20 to 2:40pm,
    when we moved on, in the company of about 20 juncos. A birder who
    passed by said that she had seen it in the morning also.
    
    Jane Tatchell, Redwood City, CA
    On 1/14/2015 3:23 PM, Len Blumin
    Len.blumin@... [SFBirds] wrote:
     The Rustic Bunting was foraging in the open
    at 11:30 am today, just south of the wood piles, in the
    company of a Dark-eyed Junco. Very satisfying views, but a
    photographer would probably prefer better light. The area
    is across the street from the Arboretum/ SF Botanical
    Garden, along Martin Luther King Drive and just south of
    Nancy Pelosi Drive. Parking along MLK Drive is easy if you
    get there early (8-9 am).Len Blumin, Mill Valley, California
    len.blumin@...http://lenblumin.blogspot.com/
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lenblumin/
    
    --
    Jane Tatchell
  22. -back to top-
  23. Spragues pipit LINK
    DATE: Jan 15, 2015 @ 2:34pm, 11 day(s) ago
    In traditional field south and east of state prison in calipatria imperial county
    
    John Sterling.
    26 Palm Ave
    Woodland, CA 95696
    Www.sterlingbirds.com
    530 908-3836
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    
  24. -back to top-
  25. Spoonbill LINK
    DATE: Jan 15, 2015 @ 11:29am, 11 day(s) ago
    Immature roseate spoonbill still here at end of garst road at south end of salton sea. Varied thrush still at sonny Bono NWR headquarters
    
    John Sterling.
    26 Palm Ave
    Woodland, CA 95696
    Www.sterlingbirds.com
    530 908-3836
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    
  26. -back to top-
  27. Varied Thrush at 29 Palms Inn photo LINK
    DATE: Jan 15, 2015 @ 8:17am, 11 day(s) ago
    Hello Birders,
    While visiting from Iowa, I saw a Varied Thrush at the 29 Palms Inn in San Bernardino County. This is a belated report, the bird was seen on January 5th at the west end of the oasis there. I saw a report of a Varied Thrush at this location a while back, so this may be the same bird sticking around.
    
    Here is a link to the photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/backpackingbirdwatcher/16099567490/
    
    Good Birding,
    
    Tucker J. Lutter
    Ohio/Iowa
    
    
  28. -back to top-
  29. Re: [CALBIRDS] Varied Thrushes throughout California LINK
    DATE: Jan 15, 2015 @ 7:18pm, 11 day(s) ago
    I took a picture of a female Varied Thrush yesterday at Helen Putnam Park in Petaluma (Sonoma County) and it appears to have a gray back. I would guess that there was probably more than fifty Varied Thrushes in the oaks yesterday, and that is being very conservative. If you are interested in viewing the picture here is a link to the webpage I posted it on: http://ronstorey.com/Recent01/
    Ron Storey
    Petaluma, CA
    On Jan 14, 2015, at 6:50 PM, John Harris johnh@... [CALBIRDS] <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
    
    There have been more than usual numbers of Varied Thrushes around here this winter, and I have not seen any with brown backs. I looked through some photos of birds taken in my yard and neighborhood and they all had gray backs.
    John Harris
    Oakdale, Stanislaus County
    
    On Wed, Jan 14, 2015 at 12:33 PM, Joseph Morlan jmorlan@... [CALBIRDS] <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
    Two subspecies of Varied Thrush occur in California distinguishable by the
    upperpart color of the females, brown in coastal breeding birds (nominate
    I. n. naevius) and gray with variable brown feather tips in the more
    northerly I. n. meruloides. Males of these two races are indistinguishable.
    
    There is some disagreement on the number of subspecies and their validity,
    but the females I have seen during this invasion have been gray backed
    birds suggesting the invasion originates from the more northerly I. n.
    meruloides. Is that what others are seeing?
    
    On 04 Jan 2015 21:33:48 -0800, "rackley94901@... [CALBIRDS]"
    <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
    
    >Does anyone have a theory about the seemingly widespread distribution of Varied Thrushes in California this Winter season? I've heard them in my neighborhood in East San Rafael (Marin County) in recent weeks which I've never experienced in 15 years living here (although I do faintly remember a winter in the 1970's - I think - when we had an irruption in this area). Just curious as I've seen a lot of reports of VT sightings throughout California in recent weeks.
    --
    Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
    "It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt
    
    
  30. -back to top-
  31. Re: [CALBIRDS] Varied Thrushes throughout California LINK
    DATE: Jan 15, 2015 @ 6:50pm, 11 day(s) ago
    There have been more than usual numbers of Varied Thrushes around here this winter, and I have not seen any with brown backs. I looked through some photos of birds taken in my yard and neighborhood and they all had gray backs.
    John Harris
    Oakdale, Stanislaus County
    
    On Wed, Jan 14, 2015 at 12:33 PM, Joseph Morlan jmorlan@... [CALBIRDS] <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
     Two subspecies of Varied Thrush occur in California distinguishable by the
    upperpart color of the females, brown in coastal breeding birds (nominate
    I. n. naevius) and gray with variable brown feather tips in the more
    northerly I. n. meruloides. Males of these two races are indistinguishable.
    
    There is some disagreement on the number of subspecies and their validity,
    but the females I have seen during this invasion have been gray backed
    birds suggesting the invasion originates from the more northerly I. n.
    meruloides. Is that what others are seeing?
    
    On 04 Jan 2015 21:33:48 -0800, "rackley94901@... [CALBIRDS]"
    <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
    
    >Does anyone have a theory about the seemingly widespread distribution of Varied Thrushes in California this Winter season? I've heard them in my neighborhood in East San Rafael (Marin County) in recent weeks which I've never experienced in 15 years living here (although I do faintly remember a winter in the 1970's - I think - when we had an irruption in this area). Just curious as I've seen a lot of reports of VT sightings throughout California in recent weeks.
    --
    Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
    "It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt
    
    
  32. -back to top-
  33. Rustic Bunting Continues in Golden Gate Park LINK
    DATE: Jan 14, 2015 @ 3:23pm, 12 day(s) ago
    The Rustic Bunting was foraging in the open at 11:30 am today, just south of the wood piles, in the company of a Dark-eyed Junco. Very satisfying views, but a photographer would probably prefer better light. The area is across the street from the Arboretum/ SF Botanical Garden, along Martin Luther King Drive and just south of Nancy Pelosi Drive. Parking along MLK Drive is easy if you get there early (8-9 am).Len Blumin, Mill Valley, Californialen.blumin@...http://lenblumin.blogspot.com/
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lenblumin/
    
    
  34. -back to top-
  35. Varied thrushes throughtout California LINK
    DATE: Jan 14, 2015 @ 1:02pm, 12 day(s) ago
    Though not directly pertinent to Joe Morlan's recent post, I would
    note that the varied thrush invasion has not been "throughout"
    California. In the far northerastern corner of the state, varied
    thrushes were not more numerous than usual throughout the fall and
    into winter. Indeed, if my own personal observations are indicative,
    the species was somewhat more scarce in fall than is typical. This
    part of the state has certainly not experienced an invasion.
    
    Ken Able
    McArthur, CA
    
    
  36. -back to top-
  37. Re: [CALBIRDS] Varied Thrushes throughout California LINK
    DATE: Jan 14, 2015 @ 12:33pm, 12 day(s) ago
    Two subspecies of Varied Thrush occur in California distinguishable by the
    upperpart color of the females, brown in coastal breeding birds (nominate
    I. n. naevius) and gray with variable brown feather tips in the more
    northerly I. n. meruloides. Males of these two races are indistinguishable.
    
    There is some disagreement on the number of subspecies and their validity,
    but the females I have seen during this invasion have been gray backed
    birds suggesting the invasion originates from the more northerly I. n.
    meruloides. Is that what others are seeing?
    
    On 04 Jan 2015 21:33:48 -0800, "rackley94901@... [CALBIRDS]"
    <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
    >Does anyone have a theory about the seemingly widespread distribution of Varied Thrushes in California this Winter season? I've heard them in my neighborhood in East San Rafael (Marin County) in recent weeks which I've never experienced in 15 years living here (although I do faintly remember a winter in the 1970's - I think - when we had an irruption in this area). Just curious as I've seen a lot of reports of VT sightings throughout California in recent weeks.
    --
    Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
    "It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt
    
    
  38. -back to top-
  39. Rustic Bunting Continues LINK
    DATE: Jan 13, 2015 @ 7:55am, 14 day(s) ago
    The Rustic Bunting was in its usual spot in Golden Gate Park just now feeding with juncos.
    David Assmann
    San Francisco
    
    
  40. -back to top-
  41. Winter Seabird Trip: Feb 22 LINK
    DATE: Jan 12, 2015 @ 2:11pm, 14 day(s) ago
    Howdy, Cal Birders,
    Shearwater Journeys will host a winter pelagic trip on Sunday, February 22 departing from Fishermans' Wharf, Monterey at 8 a.m. and returning at 1 p.m. for the annual meeting of the Pacific Seabird Group (PSG). PSG is a seabird conservation group that focuses entirely on seabirds. This pelagic trip is open to non-PSG members.
    
    Past winter pelagic trips have included: black-footed and Laysan albatrosses (short-tailed albatross, rarely); sooty, pink-footed and black-vented shearwaters; rhinoceros and Cassin's auklets; common murre; pigeon guillemot; ancient murrelet (big season for them, right now); pomarine jaeger and up to 13 species of gulls, including black-legged kittiwake; common, red-throated and Pacific loons (yellow-billed loon, rarely); Western and Clark's grebes; and red phalarope. A variety of marine mammals, including gray whales, may be observed. Winter pelagic trips can be quite productive. Great opportunity to add to one's year list!
    
    The leaders include: Abe Borker, Scott Terrill, Linda Terrill, and Debi Shearwater. The cost is $110 per person. For reservations, please send the payment, name, address, phone and email for each person in your party to: Debi Shearwater, PO Box 190, Hollister, CA 95024.
    
    Hope to see you out there!
    Shearwaters Forever,
    Debi Shearwater
    
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    
  42. -back to top-
  43. Re: OVENBIRD - Santa Clara County, Sun. Jan 1s, 2015 LINK
    DATE: Jan 12, 2015 @ 11:28am, 14 day(s) ago
    A number of birders are getting brief looks at the continuing OVENBIRD today (Monday) at the same location.
    
    Ken Schneider
    San Francisco
    
    
  44. -back to top-
  45. OVENBIRD - Santa Clara County, Sun. Jan 1s, 2015 LINK
    DATE: Jan 12, 2015 @ 9:07am, 14 day(s) ago
    Hi Calbirders!
    
    An OVENBIRD was found by Mike Rogers yesterday, Sunday, Jan 12, at Charleston Marsh, in Mountain View, Santa Clara County.
    
    Details to the location:
    
    Charleston Marsh is on Charleston Road, east off Shoreline Road, in Mountain View, California. The marsh is surrounded by a fitness trail with (old) parcourse signs. When you start the trail at Charleston Road you want to go counterclockwise, so go to the trail on your right, where the parcourse begins. When you walk down the trail you will come to a pump house on your left. On your right there is Google?s parking lot, and in front of you on the other side of a line of bushes is a tree nursery, and the other side of the tree nursery is Stevens Creek and the Stevens Creek trail. There was a blue ?nest? truck parked right next to the shrubs separating Google?s parking lot from the tree nursery. The Ovenbird was walking in the leaf litter under the bushes in this area. My looks were from standing on the tree nursery side and looking at the leaf litter/shrubs from that direction. There are 4 rows of nursery trees in wooden boxes. I walked along there.
    
    Good birding!
    Brooke Miller
    
    San Jose
    
    
  46. -back to top-
  47. Le Conte's Sparrow continues LINK
    DATE: Jan 12, 2015 @ 4:12pm, 14 day(s) ago
    The Le Conte's Sparrow was at the previously reported location at
    Abbotts Lagoon in Point Reyes NS, this morning, though much harder to
    see than two weeks ago. It stayed hidden in the grass most of the time
    and never teed up on top of the lupines while we were watching, but
    eventually provided decent looks. We also saw a mouse that another
    birder identified as a Saltmarsh Harvest Mouse, but I think that species
    is confined to the edges of San Francisco Bay, so it was more likely a
    Western Harvest Mouse. Another lifer in any case!
    
    Good birding (and mousing)
    
    Glen Tepke & Carol Chetkovich
    Oakland/Santa Cruz
    
    
  48. -back to top-
  49. Re: [CALBIRDS] ROSEATE SPOONBILL, South Salton Sea, 10 January LINK
    DATE: Jan 12, 2015 @ 3:58pm, 14 day(s) ago
    Correction to link: jacumbabirding.com
    
    Eric Kallen
    
    Sent from my iPad
    
    On Jan 11, 2015, at 10:55 AM, "Eric Kallen
    eric@... [CALBIRDS]" <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
    
    Spoonbill being seen now (11am). Same spot. Scope distance. Have some. Digi scope pics will be posted at: jacumbabirder.com
    
    Eric Kallen
    Jacumba
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    On Jan 10, 2015, at 2:25 PM, Justyn Stahl
    justyn.stahl@... [CALBIRDS] <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
    
    Message from inlandcountybirds:
    
    -----------------------------
    Thanks to Howard King delivering John Green's report. A single ROSEATE SPOONBILL was at the end of Garst and then looking west and foraging in the water. This is at Salton Sea and the bird was seen by our group around 12:30.
    
    Good Birding!
    
    Mary Freeman
    Glendale, CA
    -------------------------------
    
    A messenger of a messenger of a messenger,
    Justyn Stahl
    San Clemente Island, CA
    
    
  50. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'. 




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