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Last 5 Posts:
· Re: [CALBIRDS] Little Gull Kings County 7/3 (Jul 4, 2015)
· Little Gull Kings County 7/3 (Jul 3, 2015)
· Los Angeles Audubon Society event REMINDER: Shorebird Identification Workshop August 2015 (Jul 3, 2015)
· Re: [nwcalbird] Re: Long-toed Stint candidate in Humboldt (Jul 3, 2015)
· Black-bellied Whistling-Duck in LA County (Jul 2, 2015)
  1. Re: [CALBIRDS] Little Gull Kings County 7/3 LINK
    DATE: Jul 4, 2015 @ 8:36pm, 1 day(s) ago
    The first flickr link didn't work. Here is a working link: Little Gull, Kings County. Kent Ave. Ponds 7/3/15
    
    Little Gull, Kings County. Kent Ave. Ponds 7/3/15
    
    View on flic.kr
    Preview by Yahoo
    
    On Friday, July 3, 2015 2:55 PM, "sskalos4@... [CALBIRDS]" <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
    
    The LITTLE GULL is present in the south pond off of Kent Avenue at 2pm. We came this morning and did not see the bird. There were several other birders present who did not see the bird, either. We decided to take a break from the heat and get lunch. When we came back at 2pm we spotted the bird in the center of the south pond next to the continuing BONAPARTE'S GULL. Jim Rowoth was there and also saw the bird. He helped us to maintain our record of not dipping on rare birds :). Thanks Jim!
    
    One other birder was present on the north side of the south pond. He too spotted the gull as we were moving closer along the southern border for better looks. That birder decided to walk out along the spit in the center of the pond and flushed the gull, not once, but twice... We got great looks of both the Little Gull and Bonaparte's Gull in flight, but they both moved to the north side of the pond after the disturbance.
    
    Other notable species were one female CANVASBACK accompanied by one female REDHEAD. Two SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, a few MARBLED GODWITS, one WHIMBREL, and your usual assortment of sandpipers and plovers. There were NO Blue-winged Teal, but there were two female teal species present. The previously reported Franklin's Gull was also absent today.
    
    Very bad iPhone pictures of the gull can be found on my Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/125423072@N02/shares/r7Dx71
    
    Great bird!
    Shannon and Dan Skalos
    Pleasant Grove, CA
    
    
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  3. Little Gull Kings County 7/3 LINK
    DATE: Jul 3, 2015 @ 2:40pm, 2 day(s) ago
    The LITTLE GULL is present in the south pond off of Kent Avenue at 2pm. We came this morning and did not see the bird. There were several other birders present who did not see the bird, either. We decided to take a break from the heat and get lunch. When we came back at 2pm we spotted the bird in the center of the south pond next to the continuing BONAPARTE'S GULL. Jim Rowoth was there and also saw the bird. He helped us to maintain our record of not dipping on rare birds :). Thanks Jim!
    
    One other birder was present on the north side of the south pond. He too spotted the gull as we were moving closer along the southern border for better looks. That birder decided to walk out along the spit in the center of the pond and flushed the gull, not once, but twice... We got great looks of both the Little Gull and Bonaparte's Gull in flight, but they both moved to the north side of the pond after the disturbance.
    
    Other notable species were one female CANVASBACK accompanied by one female REDHEAD. Two SPOTTED SANDPIPERS, a few MARBLED GODWITS, one WHIMBREL, and your usual assortment of sandpipers and plovers. There were NO Blue-winged Teal, but there were two female teal species present. The previously reported Franklin's Gull was also absent today.
    
    Very bad iPhone pictures of the gull can be found on my Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/125423072@N02/shares/r7Dx71
    
    Great bird!
    Shannon and Dan Skalos
    Pleasant Grove, CA
    
    
  4. -back to top-
  5. Los Angeles Audubon Society event REMINDER: Shorebird Identification Workshop August 2015 LINK
    DATE: Jul 3, 2015 @ 9:25pm, 2 day(s) ago
    Hi BirdersThe Los Angeles Audubon Society is inviting all birders to attend this event, don?t miss out on this opportunity of learning from one of the best birders and photographers in the country:SHOREBIRD IDENTIFICATION WORKSHOPLECTURE: Sat., Aug. 29, 1?5 p.m. at Eaton Canyon Nature Center, PasadenaFIELD TRIP: Sun., Aug. 30, 8:00 a.m. until Noon or 1:00 p.m. at Piute PondsTHE SPEAKER: Our speaker, JON DUNN, needs little introduction, as he is the lead author of the NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY?S FIELD GUIDE TO THE BIRDS OF NORTH AMERICA (now in its 6th edition), has co-authored two top-notch books on bird ID and distribution with our own Kimball Garrett, and has co-written a book on gull ID with Steve Howell. He also presently sits on the American Ornithological Union Classification Committee, and is often on the California Bird Records Committee. He leads field trips to far-flung locations including Alaska, Thailand, and California - all places with remarkable shorebird migrations. As such, he is extraordinarily qualified to speak on all aspects of shorebirds and many other North American bird families. After building a foundation of basic identification skills for our more expected shorebird species, Jon will address at length the important skill of ageing shorebirds, and techniques for discriminating among the less familiar species encountered in the ABA area. Distribution and timing of occurrence will also be stressed. All of the photos for the workshop will be provided by Larry Sansone, one of our most talented local photographers. Larry has taken incredible photographs of birds across the country, and has traveled up our west coast and down the east coast of Asia, often with the primary intent of capturing the best possible images of the world?s common to very rare shorebirds in his Powerpoint presentation.The pleasant lecture venue will be Eaton Canyon Nature Center, Altadena from 1- 5 p.m., directions will be provided with your confirmation. Refreshments provided.HOW TO SIGN UP: To sign up for the lecture and/or field trip, please contact Susan Castor at (323) 876-0202 or membership@..., ?before sending any fees? to determine if the lecture or fieldtrip are full. Please provide your email address (or SASE) with your check (sorry no credit cards accepted). You will be e-mailed (or U.S. mailed) your confirmation to participate upon receipt of your check by LAAS.(UPDATE: As of July 2nd, the field trip portion of the workshop is fully booked with a wait list. Reservations still being accepted for the lecture on Saturday $30.)Mail to: Los Angeles Audubon?Field Trips, Attn: Susan Castor, PO Box 411301, Los Angeles CA 90041-8301. Lecture only: $30. Lecture. Please sign up by August 26.
    For more details, visit LAAS: http://losangelesaudubon.orgHappy Birding!
    
    Nick & Mary Freeman
    LA Audubon Fieldtrips and Programs
    Glendale, CA
    
    
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  7. Re: [nwcalbird] Re: Long-toed Stint candidate in Humboldt LINK
    DATE: Jul 3, 2015 @ 6:33pm, 2 day(s) ago
    They look like rails in that video! In confess I didn?t get that
    impression yesterday.
    
    Ken Burton
    Arcata
    
    From: mailto:nwcalbird-noreply@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2015 1:34 PM
    To: podoces@... ; calbirds@yahoogroups.com ; nwcalbird@yahoogroups.com
    Subject: Re: [nwcalbird] Re: Long-toed Stint candidate in
    Humboldt
    
    Hi Matt and Woods -
    Many thanks for the thoughts. The dark
    arrow-shaped markings down to the flanks initially made me wonder about a
    Western x Least hybrid, and the rather large bill might point one in this
    direction as well. However, I found a few images of Long-toed Stints with
    similar underparts; e.g.,http://www.birdphotography.com/species/ltst.htmlhttp://redbook24.ru/pticy/dlinnopalyj-pesochnik.htmlhttps://ayuwat.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/b19a9695.jpghttp://www.birdfinders.co.uk/news/china-beidaihe-2009-pics.html
    Regarding
    bill size, here are a few examples of presumed females at the large end of the
    spectrum, which look similar to our bird:http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/stint_long-toed/stint_long-toed_winter_thailand_5a.jpghttp://nzbirdsonline.org.nz/species/long-toed-stinthttps://www.flickr.com/photos/cheer2/136412009/in/photolist-d49xc-cNbKD-pHDjAU-9EgAcs-cNbp6-334GaZ-334Gbe-uWR7us-ge9YJd-DEzV5-7UzGer-7RjUCr-76sFwn-9EgAch-c4jTG-dra5s-d44ko-cN36c-cN1CH-8D6VvF-aieLu9-76wFAE-4Drc76-9emGte-aieM7j-aieLYf-eALFwD-aibX3z-aieL8A-4HASnk-oJTk9Z-h3CCLE-pEzr1R-334Gbk-9EKHfz-hK6jpd-hGMx15-hGMtfi-hGNdj3-hGNs4N-bsAi6q-jNAn2e-jNAkk8-5hqd43-4jRHMF-4jRHtP-4jRJ46-5PLcME-4jRJgp-9H2gB1
    The
    bird was with a mixed flock of Western and Least sandpipers but spent most of
    its time with the Leasts up on the bank and in the vegetation. However, it also
    spent some time wading up to its belly with the Westerns. When foraging on mud,
    it had a front-heavy, leaned-forward appearance, which was especially emphasized
    by the very short-looking rear end. Sean McAllister just pointed me to this
    fabulous video, in which Long-toeds are foraging with similar manner and
    posture:https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0l0RUo1FOZQ&feature=youtu.be
    A pale base to the mandible would have been nice (although Least can show
    this occasionally as well), but here are some Long-toeds with all-black
    bills:http://www.arkive.org/long-toed-stint/calidris-subminuta/image-G53437.htmlhttp://dartfordwaffler.co.uk/index.php/2-great-days-birdwatching/https://www.google.com/search?q=long-toed+stint&biw=1264&bih=929&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=D5KVVb7GLMmbyASlk45g&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ#imgrc=wWpgGZVzzZX4lM%3Ahttp://www.iranian-bird.blogfa.com/cat-66.aspx
    Of course, a bit of mud on the bill could obscure any pale color as
    well.
    On reflection, I don't think a Least x Western (or Least x White-rumped) is
    a good explanation for this bird, for such a hybrid would surely appear longer
    (not shorter) than a Least at the rear end, would have much shorter toes and
    neck, and would lack thick rufous edges to the tertials.
    Not a "perfect" Long-toed Stint in the end, but then very few birds are
    when you look closely enough (like humans!)...
    
    For further reading on Long-toed Stint ID, see:http://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/nab/v041n02/p00213-p00236.pdf
    andhttp://www.avibirds.com/pdf/T/Taigastrandloper3.pdf
    
    Best wishes for a great shorebird season,
    Tristan McKee
    Arcata, CA
    
    On Thu, Jul 2, 2015 at 9:19 AM, podoces@... [nwcalbird]
    <nwcalbird-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote: Tristan, how do you account for the dark arrow-shaped marks on the flanks?
    That is, as far as I know, a field mark restricted to Western and White-rumped
    Sandpipers. Also, you mention that the mandible was not pale-based and that
    this may not be a good field mark, but perusing the extensive collection of
    high-quality photos of Long-toed Stints from Asia available at the Oriental
    Bird Club image database (www.orientalbirdimages.com) show that Long-toed Stints in
    alternate plumage do, in fact, show this field mark. Something you haven't
    mentioned at all is the bird's behavior. The long toes and tibia aren't just
    measurements, but they have implications for how the bird holds itself, how it
    moves, how it forages, and the substrate it favors. My experience with the
    species, from Asia, is that this species is behaviorally not all that similar
    to Least Sandpiper.
    
    All of that said, though, I cannot say what this bird might be based on
    the photos you've posted. It does look a little out of the ordinary.
    
    Matt
    
    This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
    www.avast.com
    
    
  8. -back to top-
  9. Black-bellied Whistling-Duck in LA County LINK
    DATE: Jul 2, 2015 @ 4:34pm, 3 day(s) ago
    Rod Higbie found a BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK at Bonelli Regional park in Los Angeles County this afternoon (July 2). The bird was still in the same location (see below) as of 3:30.
    
    Sandy
    
    Date: 7/2/15 1:26 pm
    From: <warblerod...> [LACoBirds] <LACoBirds-noreply...>
    Subject: [LACoBirds] Bonelli Park Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
    
    Today 7/2 a Black-bellied Whistling-Duck was observed at the East
    Shore area of Bonelli Park in San Dimas this morning. It was still
    present at 1 pm in the same area. To reach this area enter the park
    on Via Verde and proceed to East Shore Drive. At the end of East
    Shore Drive take the right fork in the road and look for restroom
    #11. At 1 pm the bird was on a rock in the water directly west of
    restroom #11. The bird can fly and there are no bands on it's legs.
    I will post photos on eBird later. Rod & Pat Higbie:San Dimas
    
    Sandy Koonce
    Department of Mathematics
    University of Redlands, Redlands, CA 92373
    
    
  10. -back to top-
  11. Re: [nwcalbird] Re: Long-toed Stint candidate in Humboldt LINK
    DATE: Jul 2, 2015 @ 1:34pm, 3 day(s) ago
    Hi Matt and Woods -
    Many thanks for the thoughts. The dark arrow-shaped markings down to the flanks initially made me wonder about a Western x Least hybrid, and the rather large bill might point one in this direction as well. However, I found a few images of Long-toed Stints with similar underparts; e.g.,http://www.birdphotography.com/species/ltst.htmlhttp://redbook24.ru/pticy/dlinnopalyj-pesochnik.htmlhttps://ayuwat.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/b19a9695.jpghttp://www.birdfinders.co.uk/news/china-beidaihe-2009-pics.html
    Regarding bill size, here are a few examples of presumed females at the large end of the spectrum, which look similar to our bird:http://www.tsuru-bird.net/a_species/stint_long-toed/stint_long-toed_winter_thailand_5a.jpghttp://nzbirdsonline.org.nz/species/long-toed-stinthttps://www.flickr.com/photos/cheer2/136412009/in/photolist-d49xc-cNbKD-pHDjAU-9EgAcs-cNbp6-334GaZ-334Gbe-uWR7us-ge9YJd-DEzV5-7UzGer-7RjUCr-76sFwn-9EgAch-c4jTG-dra5s-d44ko-cN36c-cN1CH-8D6VvF-aieLu9-76wFAE-4Drc76-9emGte-aieM7j-aieLYf-eALFwD-aibX3z-aieL8A-4HASnk-oJTk9Z-h3CCLE-pEzr1R-334Gbk-9EKHfz-hK6jpd-hGMx15-hGMtfi-hGNdj3-hGNs4N-bsAi6q-jNAn2e-jNAkk8-5hqd43-4jRHMF-4jRHtP-4jRJ46-5PLcME-4jRJgp-9H2gB1
    The bird was with a mixed flock of Western and Least sandpipers but spent most of its time with the Leasts up on the bank and in the vegetation. However, it also spent some time wading up to its belly with the Westerns. When foraging on mud, it had a front-heavy, leaned-forward appearance, which was especially emphasized by the very short-looking rear end. Sean McAllister just pointed me to this fabulous video, in which Long-toeds are foraging with similar manner and posture:https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0l0RUo1FOZQ&feature=youtu.be
    A pale base to the mandible would have been nice (although Least can show this occasionally as well), but here are some Long-toeds with all-black bills:http://www.arkive.org/long-toed-stint/calidris-subminuta/image-G53437.htmlhttp://dartfordwaffler.co.uk/index.php/2-great-days-birdwatching/https://www.google.com/search?q=long-toed+stint&biw=1264&bih=929&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=D5KVVb7GLMmbyASlk45g&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ#imgrc=wWpgGZVzzZX4lM%3Ahttp://www.iranian-bird.blogfa.com/cat-66.aspx
    Of course, a bit of mud on the bill could obscure any pale color as well.
    On reflection, I don't think a Least x Western (or Least x White-rumped) is a good explanation for this bird, for such a hybrid would surely appear longer (not shorter) than a Least at the rear end, would have much shorter toes and neck, and would lack thick rufous edges to the tertials.
    Not a "perfect" Long-toed Stint in the end, but then very few birds are when you look closely enough (like humans!)...
    
    For further reading on Long-toed Stint ID, see:http://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/nab/v041n02/p00213-p00236.pdf
    andhttp://www.avibirds.com/pdf/T/Taigastrandloper3.pdf
    
    Best wishes for a great shorebird season,
    Tristan McKee
    Arcata, CA
    On Thu, Jul 2, 2015 at 9:19 AM, podoces@... [nwcalbird] <nwcalbird-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
     Tristan, how do you account for the dark arrow-shaped marks on the flanks? That is, as far as I know, a field mark restricted to Western and White-rumped Sandpipers. Also, you mention that the mandible was not pale-based and that this may not be a good field mark, but perusing the extensive collection of high-quality photos of Long-toed Stints from Asia available at the Oriental Bird Club image database (www.orientalbirdimages.com) show that Long-toed Stints in alternate plumage do, in fact, show this field mark. Something you haven't mentioned at all is the bird's behavior. The long toes and tibia aren't just measurements, but they have implications for how the bird holds itself, how it moves, how it forages, and the substrate it favors. My experience with the species, from Asia, is that this species is behaviorally not all that similar to Least Sandpiper.
    
    All of that said, though, I cannot say what this bird might be based on the photos you've posted. It does look a little out of the ordinary.
    
    Matt
    
    
  12. -back to top-
  13. Long-toed Stint candidate in Humboldt LINK
    DATE: Jul 2, 2015 @ 11:01pm, 3 day(s) ago
    I spent all day with this sandpiper at Little River Lagoon and was joined by a few other Humboldt birders in the afternoon. We had exceptionally close views of the bird in perfect light. I have been scrutinizing Least Sandpipers for many years in hopes of finding a Long-toed Stint, and despite all the variation in Leasts, I have never before seen a bird that even got my hopes up. This one, on the other hand, immediately jumped out at me as a Long-toed candidate. Over the course of the day we checked and rechecked every known field mark. Some reviewers of the photos have suggested it is a Least, but numerous structural and plumage traits, as well as the call, are more consistent with Long-toed. Several well-known field marks--pale base to lower mandible, loral
    pattern, and wing covert edges--work primarily for juveniles and are
    more obscure on adults, perhaps contributing to the confusion.The bird's overall plumage appearance was almost more like a Western than a Least--gray, black, and rufous rather than brown. There were strong braces on the back, bright rufous in the scapulars, and thick, bright rufous edges to the tertials (with some notches/bars). The bird was a little larger than any of the Leasts in the flock with notably longer legs. The toes were longer than adjacent Leasts, and the middle toe appeared just a tad longer than the tarsus. The supercilium flared a bit in front of the eye, down into the narrow dark loral line. Perhaps the most striking thing about the bird at first glance was black streaking that extended all the way down to the flanks. The black breast streaking stood out more than on a Least because the background was white rather than washed with buff or brown. In the alert position, the neck was strikingly long, reminding me of a Stilt Sandpiper. The bill was on the long side for Long-toed but not beyond some of the photos I've looked at. I heard the bird call about a dozen times, and it was unlike anything I've ever heard--a low, trilled "trrrt". The first two recordings of Long-toed on xeno-canto ("alarm calls") sound identical to what I heard.A Peregrine was harassing the birds regularly, and after a near miss at about 5pm, the small flock took off and disappeared far to the south.
    I've posted Tony Kurz and Ken Burton's photos on my flickr site, along with my crappy photos from the morning:https://www.flickr.com/photos/101791769@N08/sets/72157655322209292
    Any discussion of this bird's identification is most welcome and appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Tristan McKee
    Arcata, CA
    
    
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  15. Half Moon Bay July pelagics LINK
    DATE: Jun 30, 2015 @ 9:18pm, 5 day(s) ago
    Hi folks,
    The water is heating up offshore, and hopefully the birding will also. El Niño is gathering force off the Galapagos, and we are already seeing displacements of birds from there. Who knows, but the Kelp Gull we saw here may be part of this event? Two Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrels were caught on the Farallon Islands earlier this spring, and San Diego birders are finding some great early records and a northbound and early movement of Craveri’s Murrelets, Least SP, Buller’s Shearwaters, and even Magnificent Frigatebirds. You never know what is going to be out there, could be a bird of a lifetime like the Salvin’s Albatross we found in July last year on our boat, or maybe it will be a birdy but rarity free day? But it is shaping up to be an unusual year, and these are the first two chances of getting out there in Central California to see what is going on. July 19 and July 26 we have trips going out, both still have spaces left. You can’t expect the unexpected, but southern hemisphere seabirds like the albatross head north in June – July, so it is a good time to be watching for a stray “weirdo.”
    Let me know if you are interested, or pay directly on the site with PayPal. I am super excited to get out this season, I do not think this will be a “run of the mill” year.
    http://alvarosadventures.com/boat-trips/pelagics/
    Great birding to you all.
    Alvaro
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
  16. -back to top-
  17. El Nino birds update - south of the border LINK
    DATE: Jun 27, 2015 @ 11:26pm, 8 day(s) ago
    Hey folks
       The El Niño continues to build, the index is up to 0.7, last time the index went there it was during the 2009-10 El Niño. The models are coalescing on an event that will last at least into the end of the year, and 85% into early next year. It is strengthening quickly and is currently on track to become a large El Niño, this in conjunction with the warm water already along our coast is well, ominous. The warm water slosh along the Pacific equator is known as a Kelvin Wave, last year one of these came though and this is when predictions of an El Niño began, but it was not followed by further waves or strengthening. It lost steam. During that warm water surge we had some southward displaced Blue-footed Boobies in South America, when they reached northernmost Chile where they are extremely rare but regular. There was a die off of seabirds at this time, then it all dissipated. This year we are on our third Kelvin Wave, that one is making its way across the Pacific now. The first displaced birds southward have been detected. Again they are Blue-footed Boobies. This time a number of juveniles were seen as far south as Coquimbo, the southernmost records ever in Chile. This is over 750 miles south of where they tend to show up, so we are talking about a major move. Likely many more are involved, but northern Chile has few, although very dedicated birders. As well a Belcher’s Gull was found well to the south north of  Viña del Mar, not close enough to hear the roar from the stadiums of the Copa America… but again hundreds of miles south of where they regularly are, although this record is less noteworthy than the boobies. So displacement is happening southward, and perhaps some oddballs will reach us. But the El Niño is not only here, it is turning out to be a biggie, although it is still on the upswing, where it stops no one knows.
       Ebird records of the bird noted above are here:
       
    Blue-footed Booby
    http://ebird.org/ebird/map/bfoboo?neg=true&env.minX=&env.minY=&env.maxX=&env.maxY=&zh=false&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=6-7&bmo=6&emo=7&yr=cur
    
    Belcher’s Gull
    http://ebird.org/ebird/map/belgul?neg=true&env.minX=139.09935097580274&env.minY=-45.85600226012286&env.maxX=36.970444725802736&env.maxY=46.65279705195786&zh=true&gp=true&ev=Z&mr=6-7&bmo=6&emo=7&yr=cur&byr=2015&eyr=2015
    
    good birding. http://alvarosadventures.com/boat-trips/pelagics/
    Alvaro
    
    Alvaro Jaramillo
    alvaro@...
    www.alvarosadventures.com
    
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  19. Bridled Tern Photos LINK
    DATE: Jun 24, 2015 @ 12:32am, 12 day(s) ago
    I posted my photos of the Bridled Tern to flickr (see link below). The bird can be identified from Sooty Tern due to the thin white supercilium extending past the eye, contrasting grey back and tail from the jet black wing tips, longer tail extending past the primaries, and white extending up the neck with a contrasting black crown/grey back. Spectacled (Grey-backed) Tern can be eliminated due to the dusky dark grey back. There is also a brief video showing the aggressive nature of the bird around the nearby Elegant Terns. I last received a call from Bruce Aird around 8:10pm that the bird was still being seen at the tern colony so there is a good chance it will still be there at first light, although who knows for how long? Hopefully it will stick around for a few days so more people can see it. I know Brian Daniels still needs it for a county bird so it must be a good bird! It was a lifer for most people today, including myself.
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/77523243@N00/19101158882/in/dateposted-public/
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/77523243@N00/18920688849/in/dateposted-public/
    
    Video:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/77523243@N00/19100897082/in/dateposted-public/
    
    I also posted a couple of bad pictures of the continuing Red-eyed Vireo at nearby Huntington Central Park. Due to the late date of the bird Curtis was hypothesizing it might decide to summer in the park. The bird has made a scolding call but does not appear to be singing (maybe it?s a female?) so refinding it may prove difficult, but we managed to refind it this afternoon by staking out the trail leading into the east end of the island at 33.704563, -118.001912 (which isn?t an island but a forested area).
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/77523243@N00/19080643016/in/dateposted-public/
    
    Tom Ford-Hutchinson
    Irvine, CA
    
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  21. Bridled Tern photos LINK
    DATE: Jun 24, 2015 @ 9:49pm, 11 day(s) ago
    I have uploaded several photos of the Bridled Tern from Bolsa Chica this afternoon (Jun 23) to my Flickr page.
    Tom Benson
    San Bernardino, CA
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/40928097@N07/
    
    
  22. -back to top-
  23. Re: Fw: [OrangeCountyBirding] BRIDLED TERN LINK
    DATE: Jun 24, 2015 @ 8:03pm, 11 day(s) ago
    A few shots of Tom's bird from Bolsa.  I'm sure he'll have more to add as well. 
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/crispystatic/18915605640/
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/crispystatic/19106644821/
    
    Jeff Bray
    Irvine, CA
    
    
  24. -back to top-
  25. Ancient Murrelets LINK
    DATE: Jun 24, 2015 @ 7:28pm, 11 day(s) ago
    Sorry for the late post, but Sunday 6/14 I photographed a group of 3 Ancient Murrelets about a mile out from the Ventura Harbor. Debi Shearwater was kind enough to provide a positive ID from a photo I sent her (Thanks Again!). What’s happening with the seasons here?
    Good Birding,
    
    Danny Swicegood
    Benicia, CA
    
  26. -back to top-
  27. Records for Bridled Tern in CA LINK
    DATE: Jun 24, 2015 @ 7:14pm, 11 day(s) ago
    Thanks to Ninad Thakoor for pointing out the CBRC Database shows more recent
    records.
    
    http://www.californiabirds.org/mydb.asp?species=bridled&partial=on&sort=date&STARTDATE=&ENDDATE=&county=
    
    Joel Weintraub
    Dana Point, CA
    
    ---
    This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
    https://www.avast.com/antivirus
    
    
  28. -back to top-
  29. Fw: [OrangeCountyBirding] BRIDLED TERN LINK
    DATE: Jun 24, 2015 @ 7:01pm, 11 day(s) ago
    Forwarding a message on the OrangeCountyBirding site..... Tern at Bolsa
    Chica Preserve.... from the walkbridge area looking towards the tern colony.
    
    Original message indicateda Sooty Tern but Tom obviously feels now it's a
    much rarer species.
    
    According to the Rare Birds of California there is one accepted record for
    this species, and NO photo.
    
    Joel Weintraub
    Dana Point, CA
    
    
  30. -back to top-
  31. No scarlet tanager in alameda county LINK
    DATE: Jun 23, 2015 @ 2:01pm, 12 day(s) ago
    A bunch of us failed to relocate the male scarlet tanager today in alameda county. Some saw and photographed a female blackpoll warbler though at 10 am but it failed to show up again as of 1:20 pm.
    
    John Sterling.
    26 Palm Ave
    Woodland, CA 95696
    Www.sterlingbirds.com
    530 908-3836
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    
  32. -back to top-
  33. Fwd: [sbcobirding] Franklin's Gull and Frigate Bills in county LINK
    DATE: Jun 22, 2015 @ 10:44am, 13 day(s) ago
    See below: This Monday morning two Frigate birds where seen flying north above Goleta, Santa Barbara County.
    Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)---SBCO #362: Little Blue Heron
    Get your SBA S&D fix at http://sites.google.com/site/lehmanbosbc/
    
    Begin forwarded message:
    From: "Thomas Turner tomleeturner@... [sbcobirding]" <sbcobirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
    Subject: [sbcobirding] Franklin's Gull and Frigate Bills in county
    Date: 2015, June 22 at 09:37:43 PDT
    To: sbcobirding@yahoogroups.com
    Reply-To: Thomas Turner <tomleeturner@...>
    
    Hi all,
    [...]
    I should also report that my colleagues Hilary and Doug (who recently found a Sandhill Crane in Devereux) had two frigate birds over their house this morning (~ Ocean Meadows). I didn?t see them, but they work on birds on Pacific Islands and are a reliable source. Perhaps the same ones seen in Ventura yesterday. They were headed North.
    
    Tom
    [...]
    
    
  34. -back to top-
  35. Frigatebird LINK
    DATE: Jun 21, 2015 @ 8:39am, 14 day(s) ago
    One seen around 8:30 am doing slow circles over the ventura harbor. Long split tail white patch on the chest other than that pretty dark. Lost it in the high clouds/ marine layer. Seemed to be moving slowly west but who knows!
    Joel Barrett
    Oxnard, Ca.
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    
  36. -back to top-
  37. GLOSSY IBIS Imperial Co. LINK
    DATE: Jun 21, 2015 @ 5:50am, 15 day(s) ago
    An eBird report with photos of a GLOSSY IBIS from yesterday in Imperial County (SESS). 
    Justyn Stahl
    San Clemente Island---------- Forwarded message ----------
    
    Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) (1)
    - Reported Jun 20, 2015 10:47 by Matthew Grube
    - Calipatria, 605 West Sinclair Road, Imperial, California
    - Map: 33.17663,-115.60604
    - Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23990170
    - Comments: "An adult in breeding plumage mixed in with the White-faced Ibis in the flooded fields on the north side of Sinclair near Cox Rd.
    
    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mattgrube/19010685781" title="Glossy Ibis by mattag2002, on Flickr"><img src="https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/393/19010685781_1f7c42c2a9_z.jpg" alt="Glossy Ibis" /></a>
    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mattgrube/18981385196" title="Glossy Ibis by mattag2002, on Flickr"><img src="https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/415/18981385196_9df0d0de1f_z.jpg" alt="Glossy Ibis" /></a>"
    
    
  38. -back to top-
  39. Forty Years of California Seabirding LINK
    DATE: Jun 20, 2015 @ 6:10pm, 15 day(s) ago
    Howdy, CalBirders,
    Shearwater Journeys will celebrate its 40th year of seabirding this fall! And, we'd love to invite you to celebrate with us.
    
    Some 60,000+ birders and marine life enthusiasts have participated in thousands of Shearwater Journeys' pelagic trips over these past four decades. Participants, along with more than a hundred leaders over the years, have contributed an immense amount of data, advanced the progression of seabird field guides, fought for National Marine Sanctuaries collecting thousands of signatures, advocated for conservation laws, witnessed the return of the great whales from near decimation, seen the "return" of some seabirds such as Short-tailed Albatross and the decline of others, such as Sooty Shearwater and Ashy Storm-Petrel.
    
    We've discovered a long, long list "first" North American seabird records and found many rare-for-California seabirds. We've battled gill netting which killed thousands of Sooty Shearwaters and Common Murres, and won. We remember when Laysan Albatrosses did not nest on islands off Mexico! Marine mammals have not been neglected on our trips. We set the wheels in motion to rescue an entangled humpback whale only for the rescuers to be thwarted by the appearance of killer whales! We launched the first-ever in the world, blue whale tagging program with EarthWatch in mid-1980's. Beginning in the late 1970's, we collected the first of hundreds of killer whale images that would be used in ID catalogues. And, we're still at it today.
    
    And, we've been out there in the blue, at sea, during the biggest El Nino events of our lifetime, 1982-83 and 1998, during La Nina events and everything in between. The 1982-83 El Nino impacted every continent on Earth, and we saw events transpire in Monterey Bay that have never repeated. OH, wait a minute. I hear the red crabs are back, at least in SoCal:
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/wp/2015/06/17/red-crabs-swarm-southern-california-linked-to-warm-blob-in-pacific/
    
    There's so much more. Indeed, I could write a book about the changes I've seen. Our roots are deep and vast much like a giant kelp forest moving with the currents. It has been a long and winding journey ? and, we could not have done it without you! I am, personally, grateful and thankful for every one of you, many of whom continue to ride the seas with us, four decades later! THANK YOU!
    
    Shearwater Journeys' 2015 schedule of trips can be found on our web site:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/schedule.shtml
    
    Photographs and brief biographies of our outstanding leaders can be found at:
    http://shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com/2014/07/our-leaders.html
    
    DISCOUNTS: To celebrate our 40th year, we are offering a $40 discount on all Monterey Bay trips, except the Albacore trip, September 12th. We offer a $20 discount on our Half Moon Bay, Bodega Bay and Farallon Islands trips. All discounted trips are non-refundable, unless weathered out (unlikely) and must be postmarked by July 1. Act now!
    
    MONTEREY BAY TRIPS: All trips depart from Fishermans' Wharf at 7 am and return at 3 pm.
    JULY 31; AUGUST 7, 21; SEPTEMBER 5, 8, 0, 1O, 11, 13, 16, 25, 26, 27; OCTOBER 3, 10.
    ALBACORE: OFFSHORE MONTEREY: SEPTEMBER 12 departs at 5:30 am and returns 5:30 pm.
    Parking vouchers available for all trips, saving you at least $10.
    
    HALF MOON BAY TRIPS:
    All trips depart from Johnson's Pier, H dock, Pillar Point, Half Moon Bay at 7 am and return about 4 pm. Parking is free.
    AUGUST 2, 8, 16; SEPTEMBER 6, 15; OCTOBER 4, 11.
    
    FARALLON ISLANDS: Both trips depart from Clipper Yacht Harbor at 7:15 am, and return about 4 pm. Parking is $2/person.
    AUGUST 9: TUFTED PUFFINS & BREEDING SEABIRDS - limited spaces available
    OCTOBER 18: GREAT WHITE SHARKS & SEABIRDS
    
    BODEGA BAY:
    Departs from Port O'Bodega at 7 am and returns about 4:30 pm. Parking is free.
    SEPTEMBER 18: CORDELL BANK & BODEGA CANYON
    
    We track county lines and write eBird checklists for all of our trips. Most of our trips cover more than one county. For past trip reports including images and complete checklists, please see:
    http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/tripsumm.shtml
    
    August 2nd has proved to be an auspicious date for HAWAIIAN PETREL: August 2, 2014 at Half Moon Bay, this petrel flew right up our wake only a few miles out of the harbor. August 2, 2013 at Monterey Bay, I spotted this petrel without bins, flying alongside our vessel with a load of Sooty Shearwaters only 8 miles off Point Pinos! Most of the Hawaiian Petrels that I've seen in central California have been less than 10 miles offshore, including three in one day out of Fort Bragg. Where will you be on August 2, 2015?
    
    Todd McGrath's post on CalBirds about predicting seabirds in this uncanny season are on the mark. Recalling the BULWER'S PETREL, July 26, 1998, Monterey Bay was an amazing find, especially for a boat load of non-birders who wanted to know why I kept stopping to look at the "little black and white birds" (54 Scripps's Murrelets that day), instead of the 50+ Fin and Blue Whales! The Bulwer's Petrel was photographed sitting on the water with a BULLER'S SHEARWATER! So, yep, Buller's arrived early that year. Who would have ever dreamed of finding Black Storm-Petrels in Monterey in December? We did, in 1982. El Nino at work! There's no telling what we might find this season. Terrafin charts are showing plenty of cold water in many places. This is good. So, don't miss out this season! Celebrate!
    
    For me, there has never, ever been a dull moment. Never. If you sense a deep and abiding love of seabirds and marine mammals ?
    Shearwaters Forever,
    Debi Shearwater
    DEBRA SHEARWATER
    Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
    PO Box 190
    Hollister, CA 95024
    831.637.8527
    debi@...
    www.shearwaterjourneys.com
    www.shearwaterjourneys.blogspot.com
    
    Celebrating 40 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
    
    
  40. -back to top-
  41. Re: early push of Craveri's, Least S-P, Buller's LINK
    DATE: Jun 20, 2015 @ 4:57pm, 15 day(s) ago
    Hi Everyone,
    Thanks for the insight Paul, I thought I would chime in and just give some updates on what we are seeing in the SB Channel over the past few days.
    We have seen singles of Buller's Shearwater on June 15th (a few miles out of the Ventura Harbor)
    June 16th (one seen off the West end of Santa Cruz Island) and June 18th another single bird but loosely associated with several thousand Sooty Shearwaters (A mile or so north of Platform Gilda)
    In addition to that, Late in the afternoon of June 18th, I saw a single Murrelet a few miles north of Scorpion Ranch, Santa Cruz Island that showed dark underwings as it flew off. Normally at this time of day and viewing angle any white on a bird is gleaming in the low angle sunshine. The look was brief and I could not confirm a black spur coming down on the breast but it was note worthy none the less, unfortunately I was unable to get a photo.
    Joel Barrett
    Oxnard, Ca
    Island Packers
    Ventura,Ca
    
    
  42. -back to top-
  43. early push of Craveri's, Least S-P, Buller's LINK
    DATE: Jun 19, 2015 @ 11:34am, 16 day(s) ago
    With the addition of more unusual-for-June pelagic species off S. CA
    yesterday, here's a bit of a summary of what has happened the past 9 days:
    
    The first early, unseasonal sighting during this current 'event' was a
    single Buller's Shearwater off San Diego on June 10. This was followed
    by the pelagic trip off San Diego on June 16 which recorded 17 Buller's
    and 20 Craveri's Murrelets (plus some getting-late Scripps's
    Murrelets)--as well as an earlier-than-normal and rare Wilson's
    Storm-Petrel, and 2 small, dark, short-tailed storm-petrels that have
    since been confirmed from photos as being very early Least
    Storm-Petrels. This was followed by better looks at 6 more Least
    Storm-Petrels off San Diego on June 18, although all of those birds were
    actually in L.A. County waters based on closest point of land (which was
    the se. corner of San Clemente Is., even though we were due west of La
    Jolla). That same day we also had "only" 4 more Craveri's Murrelets, and
    NO Buller's Shearwaters. But while that was going on, also on the 18th,
    there was a flight of 10 Buller's Shearwaters being seen just a little
    farther to the west from San Clemente Island, plus at least one
    additional Buller's seen that day farther north off Ventura County.
    
    So, it appears that the initial "wave" of Buller's and Craveri's MIGHT
    have already passed through San Diego County waters and may now be
    varying distances to the north (IF they continued north...). But given
    that all the Craveri's we have seen recently off San Diego were in heavy
    wing molt and could not fly, that means they've only gotten as far as
    they can swim!!
    
    Interestingly, no Red-billed Tropicbirds have been reported on these
    same trips. Last year, another warmer-water year off Mexico, there were
    several very early and northerly (as far north as Monterey County, from
    repositioning cruises) tropicbirds seen already in May, but then the
    rest of the summer and fall seemed to be at best normal, or probably
    even below normal, for them. Perhaps it is too simplistic to say that
    warm-water species will occur off CA earlier than normal and in greater
    than normal numbers in warm-water / El Nino years, as such conditions
    might also translate in to very poor breeding seasons (in spring) in
    Mexican waters so that there are far fewer young birds 'available' to
    come north--if that is the age class that makes up a substantial percent
    of the birds seen off CA. I have heard that during a major El Nino event
    in the late 1990s Buller's Shearwaters appeared early and that some
    Least Storm-Petrels arrived already by early July (they normally aren't
    'regular' until beginning around late August) well north off central CA,
    and they conceivably might have been around even before that time but
    there was little birder coverage offshore until July.
    
    So, it would seem likely that early Buller's may well be up and down
    sections of the CA coast already, and that Craveri's and Leasts are on
    their way and may already be as far north as perhaps Orange and L. A.
    Counties, and soon to off ???? Unfortunately there aren't too many
    scheduled pelagic trips offered off the CA coast in the very near
    future, but it will be interesting to see what turns up on the trips
    later in summer. Birders might consider taking some whale-watching trips
    that are known to get offshore at least 5-10+ miles, as that should be
    enough to give one some chance at Craveri's and Leasts, if they are
    around, as those species typically don't require being nearly as far
    offshore as is needed--say--for reasonable chances at tropicbirds, much
    less Guadalupe Murrelets or pterodromas, which are much farther out.
    
    --Paul Lehman, San Diego
    
    
  44. -back to top-
  45. Three-toed Woodpecker report LINK
    DATE: Jun 17, 2015 @ 1:18pm, 18 day(s) ago
    Can anyone supply more information on this report, especially the observer (I don?t have his contact info)??
    American Three-toed Woodpecker (Picoides dorsalis) (2)- Reported Jun 12, 2015 10:00 by Mark Stephenson- Lassen Volcanic NP--Summit Lake, Shasta, California- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=40.4910874,-121.4240742&ll=40.4910874,-121.4240742- Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23943466- Comments: "laddered back, yellow on crown?
    
    John SterlingVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV26 Palm AveWoodland, CA 95695530 908-3836jsterling@...www.sterlingbirds.comMonterey Seabirdswww.montereyseabirds.com(831) 375-4658
    
    
  46. -back to top-
  47. Re: [CALBIRDS] NE CA birds LINK
    DATE: Jun 17, 2015 @ 12:54pm, 18 day(s) ago
    forgot to mention that the pair of Black Phoebes were still at the bridge on the north side of the town of Adin on Hwy 299 in southern edge of Modoc County. There are very few county records and this location is the only one with multiple records.
    John SterlingVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV26 Palm AveWoodland, CA 95695530 908-3836jsterling@...www.sterlingbirds.comMonterey Seabirdswww.montereyseabirds.com(831) 375-4658
    
    On Jun 17, 2015, at 12:52 PM, John Sterling jsterling@... [CALBIRDS] <CALBIRDS-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
    
    A few highlights from two day trip to Modoc/Lassen counties.
    
    A singing male Bobolink was present yesterday morning (but hiding and not seen or heard in the afternoon before) in the southern part of the Surprise Valley in Modoc County at one of the traditional breeding sites. Take County Road 38 in Eagleville east to second field on the left past first intersection. It was flying to and from the field and perched on fence posts.
    Two Burrowing Owls were 0.6 miles on County Road 18 (just west of Nevada State Line) north of Hwy 299?east of Cedarville in the Surprise Valley. Also Black-throated and Sagebrush sparrows were in that area.
    Also present was the pair of Eastern Kingbird on the nw corner of Blue Lake in the southern Warner Mtns, just at the northern edge of Lassen County. Park at the Day Visitors parking lot then take trail along edge of lake. This species has been nesting at the location for several years.
    
    Last night I heard one Yellow Rail at Papoose Meadow just a few miles south of Eagle Lake in Lassen County last night starting at 7:58 pm. I was there for several hours before one started calling and I immediately left to drive home so I don?t know how many were calling later. Take the dirt road heading south from the Eagle Lake Road 1.5 miles south of intersection with Gallatin Bay Marina turnoff. Take first left and proceed to end at western edge of meadow. Walk straight out across meadow to the wetland.
    
    John SterlingVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV26 Palm AveWoodland, CA 95695530 908-3836jsterling@...www.sterlingbirds.comMonterey Seabirdswww.montereyseabirds.com(831) 375-4658
    
    
  48. -back to top-
  49. NE CA birds LINK
    DATE: Jun 17, 2015 @ 12:52pm, 18 day(s) ago
    A few highlights from two day trip to Modoc/Lassen counties.
    
    A singing male Bobolink was present yesterday morning (but hiding and not seen or heard in the afternoon before) in the southern part of the Surprise Valley in Modoc County at one of the traditional breeding sites. Take County Road 38 in Eagleville east to second field on the left past first intersection. It was flying to and from the field and perched on fence posts.
    Two Burrowing Owls were 0.6 miles on County Road 18 (just west of Nevada State Line) north of Hwy 299?east of Cedarville in the Surprise Valley. Also Black-throated and Sagebrush sparrows were in that area.
    Also present was the pair of Eastern Kingbird on the nw corner of Blue Lake in the southern Warner Mtns, just at the northern edge of Lassen County. Park at the Day Visitors parking lot then take trail along edge of lake. This species has been nesting at the location for several years.
    
    Last night I heard one Yellow Rail at Papoose Meadow just a few miles south of Eagle Lake in Lassen County last night starting at 7:58 pm. I was there for several hours before one started calling and I immediately left to drive home so I don?t know how many were calling later. Take the dirt road heading south from the Eagle Lake Road 1.5 miles south of intersection with Gallatin Bay Marina turnoff. Take first left and proceed to end at western edge of meadow. Walk straight out across meadow to the wetland.
    
    John SterlingVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV26 Palm AveWoodland, CA 95695530 908-3836jsterling@...www.sterlingbirds.comMonterey Seabirdswww.montereyseabirds.com(831) 375-4658
    
    
  50. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'. 




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